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Understanding cervical screening non-attendance among ethnic minority women in England.

Marlow LA, Wardle J, Waller J - Br. J. Cancer (2015)

Bottom Line: Migrating to the United Kingdom, speaking a language other than English and low education level were associated with being disengaged.Being overdue was associated with older age.It is important to ensure that BAME women understand cancer screening is intended for asymptomatic women and those who have ceased sexual activity may still be at risk.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Cancer Research UK Health Behaviour Research Centre, UCL, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK.

ABSTRACT

Background: Women from Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) backgrounds are less likely to attend cervical screening than White British women. This study explored sociodemographic and attitudinal correlates of cervical screening non-attendance among BAME women.

Methods: Women (30-60 years) were recruited from Indian, Pakistani, Bangladeshi, Caribbean, African and White British backgrounds (n=720). Participants completed structured interviews.

Results: BAME women were more likely to be non-attenders than white British women (44-71% vs 12%) and fell into two groups: the disengaged and the overdue. Migrating to the United Kingdom, speaking a language other than English and low education level were associated with being disengaged. Being overdue was associated with older age. Three attitudinal barriers were associated with being overdue for screening among BAME women: low perceived risk of cervical cancer due to sexual inactivity, belief that screening is unnecessary without symptoms and difficulty finding an appointment that fits in with other commitments.

Conclusions: BAME non-attenders appear to fall into two groups, and interventions for these groups may need to be targeted and tailored accordingly. It is important to ensure that BAME women understand cancer screening is intended for asymptomatic women and those who have ceased sexual activity may still be at risk.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Self-reported cervical screening status by ethnicity.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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fig1: Self-reported cervical screening status by ethnicity.

Mentions: BAME non-attenders appeared to represent two conceptually different groups (see Figure 1): disengaged women (those who have not heard of screening or reported never having received an invitation) and overdue (those who had not been screened in the last 5 years/or had not attended despite receiving an invitation). We wanted to identify which characteristics, within ethnic minority groups contributed to being disengaged or overdue. White British women were excluded from these analyses.


Understanding cervical screening non-attendance among ethnic minority women in England.

Marlow LA, Wardle J, Waller J - Br. J. Cancer (2015)

Self-reported cervical screening status by ethnicity.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4559824&req=5

fig1: Self-reported cervical screening status by ethnicity.
Mentions: BAME non-attenders appeared to represent two conceptually different groups (see Figure 1): disengaged women (those who have not heard of screening or reported never having received an invitation) and overdue (those who had not been screened in the last 5 years/or had not attended despite receiving an invitation). We wanted to identify which characteristics, within ethnic minority groups contributed to being disengaged or overdue. White British women were excluded from these analyses.

Bottom Line: Migrating to the United Kingdom, speaking a language other than English and low education level were associated with being disengaged.Being overdue was associated with older age.It is important to ensure that BAME women understand cancer screening is intended for asymptomatic women and those who have ceased sexual activity may still be at risk.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Cancer Research UK Health Behaviour Research Centre, UCL, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK.

ABSTRACT

Background: Women from Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) backgrounds are less likely to attend cervical screening than White British women. This study explored sociodemographic and attitudinal correlates of cervical screening non-attendance among BAME women.

Methods: Women (30-60 years) were recruited from Indian, Pakistani, Bangladeshi, Caribbean, African and White British backgrounds (n=720). Participants completed structured interviews.

Results: BAME women were more likely to be non-attenders than white British women (44-71% vs 12%) and fell into two groups: the disengaged and the overdue. Migrating to the United Kingdom, speaking a language other than English and low education level were associated with being disengaged. Being overdue was associated with older age. Three attitudinal barriers were associated with being overdue for screening among BAME women: low perceived risk of cervical cancer due to sexual inactivity, belief that screening is unnecessary without symptoms and difficulty finding an appointment that fits in with other commitments.

Conclusions: BAME non-attenders appear to fall into two groups, and interventions for these groups may need to be targeted and tailored accordingly. It is important to ensure that BAME women understand cancer screening is intended for asymptomatic women and those who have ceased sexual activity may still be at risk.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus