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Tunable growth of silver nanobelts on monolithic activated carbon with size-dependent plasmonic response.

Zhao H, Ning Y, Zhao B, Yin F, Du C, Wang F, Lai Y, Zheng J, Li S, Chen L - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: The widths of silver nanobelts are positively correlated to the growth temperatures.The width/thickness ratio of the silver nanobelts can be adjusted so that their transversal plasmonic absorption peaks can nearly span the whole visible light band, which endows them with different colours.This work demonstrates the great versatility of a simple, green and conceptually novel approach in controlled synthesis of noble metal nanostructures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu Marine Resources Development Research Institute, Huaihai Institute of Technology, Lianyungang 222005, P. R. China.

ABSTRACT
Silver is one of the most important materials in plasmonics. Tuning the size of various silver nanostructures has been actively pursued in the last decade. However, silver nanobelt, a typical one-dimensional silver nanostructure, has not been systematically studied as to tuning its size for controllable plasmonic response. Here we show that silver nanobelts, with mean width ranging from 45 to 105 nm and thickness at ca. 13 nm, can grow abundantly on monolithic activated carbon (MAC) through a galvanic-cell reaction mechanism. The widths of silver nanobelts are positively correlated to the growth temperatures. The width/thickness ratio of the silver nanobelts can be adjusted so that their transversal plasmonic absorption peaks can nearly span the whole visible light band, which endows them with different colours. This work demonstrates the great versatility of a simple, green and conceptually novel approach in controlled synthesis of noble metal nanostructures.

No MeSH data available.


A schematic illustrating the synthetic procedure of silver nanobelts on MAC.(a) Firstly, an MAC was immersed into a freshly prepared [Ag(NH3)2NO3] solution. (b) Secondly, after 24 hr, silver micro- belts/plates were prepared on the surface of MAC. (c) Thirdly, the MAC in (b) was stripped of loosely attached silver, ultrasonicated in ethanol and dried in air. It was labelled as MAC@Ag after the treatment. (d) Lastly, after immersing MAC@Ag in DI water containing Ag2O powder for 48 hr, fluffy silver nanobelts grew on MAC@Ag substrates. The insets show SEM images of (a) untreated MAC, (b) silver micro belts/plates grown on MAC, (c) the exterior surface of MAC@Ag and (d) silver nanobelts.
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f5: A schematic illustrating the synthetic procedure of silver nanobelts on MAC.(a) Firstly, an MAC was immersed into a freshly prepared [Ag(NH3)2NO3] solution. (b) Secondly, after 24 hr, silver micro- belts/plates were prepared on the surface of MAC. (c) Thirdly, the MAC in (b) was stripped of loosely attached silver, ultrasonicated in ethanol and dried in air. It was labelled as MAC@Ag after the treatment. (d) Lastly, after immersing MAC@Ag in DI water containing Ag2O powder for 48 hr, fluffy silver nanobelts grew on MAC@Ag substrates. The insets show SEM images of (a) untreated MAC, (b) silver micro belts/plates grown on MAC, (c) the exterior surface of MAC@Ag and (d) silver nanobelts.

Mentions: It is imperative to understand why the nanobelt size can be greatly reduced from micrometer25 to nanometer scale. Figure 5 displays the synthestic procedure of Ag nanobelts on MAC (see Methods for more detail) in this work. Briefly speaking, colourful Ag nanobelts (in Fig. 5d) were prepared by immersing MAC preloaded with metal particles (MAC@Ag as shown in Fig. 5c) in water, where sparingly soluble Ag2O powders had been placed at the bottom of the beaker. Fluffy Ag nanobelts grew on the exterior surface of MAC@Ag as resulted from continuous reduction of Ag+ (dissolved from Ag2O) by reductive functional groups (such as –OH or –CH=O) on the interior surface of MAC@Ag through a galvanic cell reaction mechanism (Fig. 6)232425. There are mainly two differences from our previous work25, where Ag belts only at the micrometer scale were produced. Firstly, MAC should be preloaded with tightly bound metal particles. Beside Ag, we have found that preloaded Au, Pt or Pd particles can also be used to initiate the growth of nanometer-scaled Ag belts. There is no specific requirement for the size and shape of the preloaded metal particles. In our experiments, the MAC that had been used to grow Ag micro-belts or plates in [Ag(NH3)2]NO3 aqueous solution25 has proven to be excellent candidates only if the loosely-attached micro-belts or plates were removed and the MAC ultrasonicated and dried (seeFig. 5a–c). Secondly, instead of [Ag(NH3)2]NO3, Ag2O was used as the Ag precursor in our current work. We have found that, at appropriate concentrations, say, 10−4 M, [Ag(NH3)2]NO3 can also be occasionally used to grow nanometer-scaled Ag belts, but the reproducibility cannot stand test. On the other hand, Ag2O is a robust precursor for growing Ag nanobelts.


Tunable growth of silver nanobelts on monolithic activated carbon with size-dependent plasmonic response.

Zhao H, Ning Y, Zhao B, Yin F, Du C, Wang F, Lai Y, Zheng J, Li S, Chen L - Sci Rep (2015)

A schematic illustrating the synthetic procedure of silver nanobelts on MAC.(a) Firstly, an MAC was immersed into a freshly prepared [Ag(NH3)2NO3] solution. (b) Secondly, after 24 hr, silver micro- belts/plates were prepared on the surface of MAC. (c) Thirdly, the MAC in (b) was stripped of loosely attached silver, ultrasonicated in ethanol and dried in air. It was labelled as MAC@Ag after the treatment. (d) Lastly, after immersing MAC@Ag in DI water containing Ag2O powder for 48 hr, fluffy silver nanobelts grew on MAC@Ag substrates. The insets show SEM images of (a) untreated MAC, (b) silver micro belts/plates grown on MAC, (c) the exterior surface of MAC@Ag and (d) silver nanobelts.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4559802&req=5

f5: A schematic illustrating the synthetic procedure of silver nanobelts on MAC.(a) Firstly, an MAC was immersed into a freshly prepared [Ag(NH3)2NO3] solution. (b) Secondly, after 24 hr, silver micro- belts/plates were prepared on the surface of MAC. (c) Thirdly, the MAC in (b) was stripped of loosely attached silver, ultrasonicated in ethanol and dried in air. It was labelled as MAC@Ag after the treatment. (d) Lastly, after immersing MAC@Ag in DI water containing Ag2O powder for 48 hr, fluffy silver nanobelts grew on MAC@Ag substrates. The insets show SEM images of (a) untreated MAC, (b) silver micro belts/plates grown on MAC, (c) the exterior surface of MAC@Ag and (d) silver nanobelts.
Mentions: It is imperative to understand why the nanobelt size can be greatly reduced from micrometer25 to nanometer scale. Figure 5 displays the synthestic procedure of Ag nanobelts on MAC (see Methods for more detail) in this work. Briefly speaking, colourful Ag nanobelts (in Fig. 5d) were prepared by immersing MAC preloaded with metal particles (MAC@Ag as shown in Fig. 5c) in water, where sparingly soluble Ag2O powders had been placed at the bottom of the beaker. Fluffy Ag nanobelts grew on the exterior surface of MAC@Ag as resulted from continuous reduction of Ag+ (dissolved from Ag2O) by reductive functional groups (such as –OH or –CH=O) on the interior surface of MAC@Ag through a galvanic cell reaction mechanism (Fig. 6)232425. There are mainly two differences from our previous work25, where Ag belts only at the micrometer scale were produced. Firstly, MAC should be preloaded with tightly bound metal particles. Beside Ag, we have found that preloaded Au, Pt or Pd particles can also be used to initiate the growth of nanometer-scaled Ag belts. There is no specific requirement for the size and shape of the preloaded metal particles. In our experiments, the MAC that had been used to grow Ag micro-belts or plates in [Ag(NH3)2]NO3 aqueous solution25 has proven to be excellent candidates only if the loosely-attached micro-belts or plates were removed and the MAC ultrasonicated and dried (seeFig. 5a–c). Secondly, instead of [Ag(NH3)2]NO3, Ag2O was used as the Ag precursor in our current work. We have found that, at appropriate concentrations, say, 10−4 M, [Ag(NH3)2]NO3 can also be occasionally used to grow nanometer-scaled Ag belts, but the reproducibility cannot stand test. On the other hand, Ag2O is a robust precursor for growing Ag nanobelts.

Bottom Line: The widths of silver nanobelts are positively correlated to the growth temperatures.The width/thickness ratio of the silver nanobelts can be adjusted so that their transversal plasmonic absorption peaks can nearly span the whole visible light band, which endows them with different colours.This work demonstrates the great versatility of a simple, green and conceptually novel approach in controlled synthesis of noble metal nanostructures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu Marine Resources Development Research Institute, Huaihai Institute of Technology, Lianyungang 222005, P. R. China.

ABSTRACT
Silver is one of the most important materials in plasmonics. Tuning the size of various silver nanostructures has been actively pursued in the last decade. However, silver nanobelt, a typical one-dimensional silver nanostructure, has not been systematically studied as to tuning its size for controllable plasmonic response. Here we show that silver nanobelts, with mean width ranging from 45 to 105 nm and thickness at ca. 13 nm, can grow abundantly on monolithic activated carbon (MAC) through a galvanic-cell reaction mechanism. The widths of silver nanobelts are positively correlated to the growth temperatures. The width/thickness ratio of the silver nanobelts can be adjusted so that their transversal plasmonic absorption peaks can nearly span the whole visible light band, which endows them with different colours. This work demonstrates the great versatility of a simple, green and conceptually novel approach in controlled synthesis of noble metal nanostructures.

No MeSH data available.