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Tunable growth of silver nanobelts on monolithic activated carbon with size-dependent plasmonic response.

Zhao H, Ning Y, Zhao B, Yin F, Du C, Wang F, Lai Y, Zheng J, Li S, Chen L - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: The widths of silver nanobelts are positively correlated to the growth temperatures.The width/thickness ratio of the silver nanobelts can be adjusted so that their transversal plasmonic absorption peaks can nearly span the whole visible light band, which endows them with different colours.This work demonstrates the great versatility of a simple, green and conceptually novel approach in controlled synthesis of noble metal nanostructures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu Marine Resources Development Research Institute, Huaihai Institute of Technology, Lianyungang 222005, P. R. China.

ABSTRACT
Silver is one of the most important materials in plasmonics. Tuning the size of various silver nanostructures has been actively pursued in the last decade. However, silver nanobelt, a typical one-dimensional silver nanostructure, has not been systematically studied as to tuning its size for controllable plasmonic response. Here we show that silver nanobelts, with mean width ranging from 45 to 105 nm and thickness at ca. 13 nm, can grow abundantly on monolithic activated carbon (MAC) through a galvanic-cell reaction mechanism. The widths of silver nanobelts are positively correlated to the growth temperatures. The width/thickness ratio of the silver nanobelts can be adjusted so that their transversal plasmonic absorption peaks can nearly span the whole visible light band, which endows them with different colours. This work demonstrates the great versatility of a simple, green and conceptually novel approach in controlled synthesis of noble metal nanostructures.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Extinction spectra and their dependence on the size of silver nanobelts.(a) Extinction spectra of silver nanobelts. (b) The dependence of the visible light absorption peak wavelength on the size (width/thickness ratio) of silver nanobelt.
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f4: Extinction spectra and their dependence on the size of silver nanobelts.(a) Extinction spectra of silver nanobelts. (b) The dependence of the visible light absorption peak wavelength on the size (width/thickness ratio) of silver nanobelt.

Mentions: It is well known that the brilliant colour of noble metal nanoparticles is resulted from absorption and scattering of light associated with surface plasmon resonance (SPR)9, i.e. the collective oscillation of free electrons in phase with the alternating electric field of the incident light. Using UV-Vis-NIR to measure the extinction spectra is a traditional and most prevalent way to characterize the plasmonic response of noble metal nanoparticles. The extinction spectra of the five nanobelt samples mentioned above are illustrated in Fig. 4a. Each happens to exhibit three distinctive peaks at the UV, visible and IR band respectively. While the wavelength of the UV (335 nm) and IR (1459 nm) peaks are relatively invariant, that of the visible peak shifts significantly from 514 nm to 714 nm. (Yellow Ag nanobelts with their visible peak wavelength at 474 nm were also obtained in our experiments at reaction temperature 13 °C. However, due to the lack of structural characterization they are not included here. seeSupplementary Fig. S2). Notably, though there have been many experimental and theoretical studies concerning UV-Vis-NIR extinction spectra of other nanostructures, those for Au and Ag nanobelts are quite scarce172229. Here, the UV peak at 335 nm may be tentatively attributed to the out-of-plane quadrupole plasmon resonance mode, based on discrete dipole approximation (DDA) calculations by Schatz et al.1730. The invariance of this peak is similar to the quadrupole resonance of Ag nanowires, whose wavelength is also independent on their diameter15. The NIR peak at 1459 nm should be ascribed to the first overtone of O-H stretch of the ethanol solvent3132.


Tunable growth of silver nanobelts on monolithic activated carbon with size-dependent plasmonic response.

Zhao H, Ning Y, Zhao B, Yin F, Du C, Wang F, Lai Y, Zheng J, Li S, Chen L - Sci Rep (2015)

Extinction spectra and their dependence on the size of silver nanobelts.(a) Extinction spectra of silver nanobelts. (b) The dependence of the visible light absorption peak wavelength on the size (width/thickness ratio) of silver nanobelt.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4559802&req=5

f4: Extinction spectra and their dependence on the size of silver nanobelts.(a) Extinction spectra of silver nanobelts. (b) The dependence of the visible light absorption peak wavelength on the size (width/thickness ratio) of silver nanobelt.
Mentions: It is well known that the brilliant colour of noble metal nanoparticles is resulted from absorption and scattering of light associated with surface plasmon resonance (SPR)9, i.e. the collective oscillation of free electrons in phase with the alternating electric field of the incident light. Using UV-Vis-NIR to measure the extinction spectra is a traditional and most prevalent way to characterize the plasmonic response of noble metal nanoparticles. The extinction spectra of the five nanobelt samples mentioned above are illustrated in Fig. 4a. Each happens to exhibit three distinctive peaks at the UV, visible and IR band respectively. While the wavelength of the UV (335 nm) and IR (1459 nm) peaks are relatively invariant, that of the visible peak shifts significantly from 514 nm to 714 nm. (Yellow Ag nanobelts with their visible peak wavelength at 474 nm were also obtained in our experiments at reaction temperature 13 °C. However, due to the lack of structural characterization they are not included here. seeSupplementary Fig. S2). Notably, though there have been many experimental and theoretical studies concerning UV-Vis-NIR extinction spectra of other nanostructures, those for Au and Ag nanobelts are quite scarce172229. Here, the UV peak at 335 nm may be tentatively attributed to the out-of-plane quadrupole plasmon resonance mode, based on discrete dipole approximation (DDA) calculations by Schatz et al.1730. The invariance of this peak is similar to the quadrupole resonance of Ag nanowires, whose wavelength is also independent on their diameter15. The NIR peak at 1459 nm should be ascribed to the first overtone of O-H stretch of the ethanol solvent3132.

Bottom Line: The widths of silver nanobelts are positively correlated to the growth temperatures.The width/thickness ratio of the silver nanobelts can be adjusted so that their transversal plasmonic absorption peaks can nearly span the whole visible light band, which endows them with different colours.This work demonstrates the great versatility of a simple, green and conceptually novel approach in controlled synthesis of noble metal nanostructures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu Marine Resources Development Research Institute, Huaihai Institute of Technology, Lianyungang 222005, P. R. China.

ABSTRACT
Silver is one of the most important materials in plasmonics. Tuning the size of various silver nanostructures has been actively pursued in the last decade. However, silver nanobelt, a typical one-dimensional silver nanostructure, has not been systematically studied as to tuning its size for controllable plasmonic response. Here we show that silver nanobelts, with mean width ranging from 45 to 105 nm and thickness at ca. 13 nm, can grow abundantly on monolithic activated carbon (MAC) through a galvanic-cell reaction mechanism. The widths of silver nanobelts are positively correlated to the growth temperatures. The width/thickness ratio of the silver nanobelts can be adjusted so that their transversal plasmonic absorption peaks can nearly span the whole visible light band, which endows them with different colours. This work demonstrates the great versatility of a simple, green and conceptually novel approach in controlled synthesis of noble metal nanostructures.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus