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Comparisons of allometric and climate-derived estimates of tree coarse root carbon stocks in forests of the United States.

Russell MB, Domke GM, Woodall CW, D'Amato AW - Carbon Balance Manag (2015)

Bottom Line: Refined estimation of carbon (C) stocks within forest ecosystems is a critical component of efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and mitigate the effects of projected climate change through forest C management.By combining allometric equations with trends in temperature, we conclude that climate variables can be used to adjust the US NGHGI estimates of belowground C stocks.Such strategies can be used to determine the effects of future global change scenarios within a C accounting framework.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Forest Resources, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 55108 USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Refined estimation of carbon (C) stocks within forest ecosystems is a critical component of efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and mitigate the effects of projected climate change through forest C management. Specifically, belowground C stocks are currently estimated in the United States' national greenhouse gas inventory (US NGHGI) using nationally consistent species- and diameter-specific equations applied to individual trees. Recent scientific evidence has pointed to the importance of climate as a driver of belowground C stocks. This study estimates belowground C using current methods applied in the US NGHGI and describes a new approach for merging both allometric models with climate-derived predictions of belowground C stocks.

Results: Climate-adjusted predictions were variable depending on the region and forest type of interest, but represented an increase of 368.87 Tg of belowground C across the US, or a 6.4 % increase when compared to currently-implemented NGHGI estimates. Random forests regressions indicated that aboveground biomass, stand age, and stand origin (i.e., planted versus artificial regeneration) were useful predictors of belowground C stocks. Decreases in belowground C stocks were modeled after projecting mean annual temperatures at various locations throughout the US up to year 2090.

Conclusions: By combining allometric equations with trends in temperature, we conclude that climate variables can be used to adjust the US NGHGI estimates of belowground C stocks. Such strategies can be used to determine the effects of future global change scenarios within a C accounting framework.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Distribution of live-tree belowground C estimates from the model of Reich et al. [8] (BGCClim; Mg ha−1)
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Fig1: Distribution of live-tree belowground C estimates from the model of Reich et al. [8] (BGCClim; Mg ha−1)

Mentions: Estimates of belowground carbon (BGC) from approaches currently employed in the US NGHGI suggest that C stocks are dependent on geographic region and forest type. Mean values of belowground carbon in the US greenhouse gas inventory (BGCNGHGI) were small in short-statured, open forests such as pinyon-juniper and woodland hardwood types (typically less than 2 Mg ha−1). Mean BGCNGHGI was largest in hemlock-Sitka spruce forests in the Pacific Northwest [40.76 ± 0.96 Mg ha−1 (mean ± SE)] and redwood forests in the Pacific Southwest (59.27 ± 7.06 Mg ha−1). For climate-derived estimates of belowground C, belowground carbon from climate-derived models (BGCClim) stock estimates were slightly smaller in magnitude compared to BGCNGHGI estimates [e.g., hemlock-Sitka spruce (33.82 ± 0.80 Mg ha−1) and redwood forests (45.64 ± 5.44 Mg ha−1)] and generally showed decreasing C at lower latitudes (Fig. 1). On average, BGCClim estimates were 0.60 Mg ha−1 greater than current BGCNGHGI models when considering all forest types (Additional file 1: Table S1).Fig. 1


Comparisons of allometric and climate-derived estimates of tree coarse root carbon stocks in forests of the United States.

Russell MB, Domke GM, Woodall CW, D'Amato AW - Carbon Balance Manag (2015)

Distribution of live-tree belowground C estimates from the model of Reich et al. [8] (BGCClim; Mg ha−1)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4559578&req=5

Fig1: Distribution of live-tree belowground C estimates from the model of Reich et al. [8] (BGCClim; Mg ha−1)
Mentions: Estimates of belowground carbon (BGC) from approaches currently employed in the US NGHGI suggest that C stocks are dependent on geographic region and forest type. Mean values of belowground carbon in the US greenhouse gas inventory (BGCNGHGI) were small in short-statured, open forests such as pinyon-juniper and woodland hardwood types (typically less than 2 Mg ha−1). Mean BGCNGHGI was largest in hemlock-Sitka spruce forests in the Pacific Northwest [40.76 ± 0.96 Mg ha−1 (mean ± SE)] and redwood forests in the Pacific Southwest (59.27 ± 7.06 Mg ha−1). For climate-derived estimates of belowground C, belowground carbon from climate-derived models (BGCClim) stock estimates were slightly smaller in magnitude compared to BGCNGHGI estimates [e.g., hemlock-Sitka spruce (33.82 ± 0.80 Mg ha−1) and redwood forests (45.64 ± 5.44 Mg ha−1)] and generally showed decreasing C at lower latitudes (Fig. 1). On average, BGCClim estimates were 0.60 Mg ha−1 greater than current BGCNGHGI models when considering all forest types (Additional file 1: Table S1).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Refined estimation of carbon (C) stocks within forest ecosystems is a critical component of efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and mitigate the effects of projected climate change through forest C management.By combining allometric equations with trends in temperature, we conclude that climate variables can be used to adjust the US NGHGI estimates of belowground C stocks.Such strategies can be used to determine the effects of future global change scenarios within a C accounting framework.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Forest Resources, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 55108 USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Refined estimation of carbon (C) stocks within forest ecosystems is a critical component of efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and mitigate the effects of projected climate change through forest C management. Specifically, belowground C stocks are currently estimated in the United States' national greenhouse gas inventory (US NGHGI) using nationally consistent species- and diameter-specific equations applied to individual trees. Recent scientific evidence has pointed to the importance of climate as a driver of belowground C stocks. This study estimates belowground C using current methods applied in the US NGHGI and describes a new approach for merging both allometric models with climate-derived predictions of belowground C stocks.

Results: Climate-adjusted predictions were variable depending on the region and forest type of interest, but represented an increase of 368.87 Tg of belowground C across the US, or a 6.4 % increase when compared to currently-implemented NGHGI estimates. Random forests regressions indicated that aboveground biomass, stand age, and stand origin (i.e., planted versus artificial regeneration) were useful predictors of belowground C stocks. Decreases in belowground C stocks were modeled after projecting mean annual temperatures at various locations throughout the US up to year 2090.

Conclusions: By combining allometric equations with trends in temperature, we conclude that climate variables can be used to adjust the US NGHGI estimates of belowground C stocks. Such strategies can be used to determine the effects of future global change scenarios within a C accounting framework.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus