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All-inside meniscal repair surgery: factors affecting the outcome.

Majeed H, Karuppiah S, Sigamoney KV, Geutjens G, Straw RG - J Orthop Traumatol (2015)

Bottom Line: Ligament injuries were found in 61 % of the patients (n = 83).The failure rate was found to be 13 % in patients who were younger than 25 years (61 %) and 15 % in patients who were older than 25 years (39 %).Level IV.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University Hospital of North Staffordshire, Stoke-on-Trent, ST4 6QG, UK, haroonmajeed@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Meniscal injury is currently a well-recognized source of knee dysfunction. While it would be ideal to repair all meniscus tears, the failure rate is significantly high, although it may be reduced by careful selection of the patients. Our objective was to assess the outcome of meniscal repair surgery and the role of simultaneous reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL).

Materials and methods: Retrospectively, all consecutive patients between January 2008 and 2011 who underwent meniscal repair were included. Patients were identified using the hospital database with diagnosis and procedure codes. Patient notes were reviewed, including details of the type of tear, chronicity, location, and surgery. We used symptomatic resolution as the outcome measure.

Results: 136 Meniscal repairs were performed in 122 patients with a mean age of 26.8 years. Mean follow-up duration was 9 months. 63 % of the patients underwent medial and 37 % underwent lateral meniscal repair, with failure rates of 19 % for medial and 12 % for lateral menisci. Ligament injuries were found in 61 % of the patients (n = 83). Failure of meniscal repair occurred in 14.5 % (n = 12) of the patients who had early ACL reconstruction and in 27 % (n = 22) of the patients who had delayed ACL reconstruction (p = 0.0006). The failure rate was found to be 13 % in patients who were younger than 25 years (61 %) and 15 % in patients who were older than 25 years (39 %).

Conclusion: The success rate of meniscal repair was found to be significantly better when ACL reconstruction was performed simultaneously with meniscal repair.

Level of evidence: Level IV.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Meniscal repair using the vertical mattress technique
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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Fig1: Meniscal repair using the vertical mattress technique

Mentions: The techniques employed for meniscal repair have also evolved in recent years. First-generation techniques for meniscal repair were based on Henning’s technique (first inside-out repair, 1980) [4], but the potential risk of neurovascular damage has been a major concern for this type of repair. Russell Warren [5] introduced an outside-in technique which aimed at reducing neurovascular complications. In recent years, an all-inside technique has been introduced, which is widely used currently (Figs. 1, 2) [6].Fig. 1


All-inside meniscal repair surgery: factors affecting the outcome.

Majeed H, Karuppiah S, Sigamoney KV, Geutjens G, Straw RG - J Orthop Traumatol (2015)

Meniscal repair using the vertical mattress technique
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4559536&req=5

Fig1: Meniscal repair using the vertical mattress technique
Mentions: The techniques employed for meniscal repair have also evolved in recent years. First-generation techniques for meniscal repair were based on Henning’s technique (first inside-out repair, 1980) [4], but the potential risk of neurovascular damage has been a major concern for this type of repair. Russell Warren [5] introduced an outside-in technique which aimed at reducing neurovascular complications. In recent years, an all-inside technique has been introduced, which is widely used currently (Figs. 1, 2) [6].Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Ligament injuries were found in 61 % of the patients (n = 83).The failure rate was found to be 13 % in patients who were younger than 25 years (61 %) and 15 % in patients who were older than 25 years (39 %).Level IV.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University Hospital of North Staffordshire, Stoke-on-Trent, ST4 6QG, UK, haroonmajeed@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Meniscal injury is currently a well-recognized source of knee dysfunction. While it would be ideal to repair all meniscus tears, the failure rate is significantly high, although it may be reduced by careful selection of the patients. Our objective was to assess the outcome of meniscal repair surgery and the role of simultaneous reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL).

Materials and methods: Retrospectively, all consecutive patients between January 2008 and 2011 who underwent meniscal repair were included. Patients were identified using the hospital database with diagnosis and procedure codes. Patient notes were reviewed, including details of the type of tear, chronicity, location, and surgery. We used symptomatic resolution as the outcome measure.

Results: 136 Meniscal repairs were performed in 122 patients with a mean age of 26.8 years. Mean follow-up duration was 9 months. 63 % of the patients underwent medial and 37 % underwent lateral meniscal repair, with failure rates of 19 % for medial and 12 % for lateral menisci. Ligament injuries were found in 61 % of the patients (n = 83). Failure of meniscal repair occurred in 14.5 % (n = 12) of the patients who had early ACL reconstruction and in 27 % (n = 22) of the patients who had delayed ACL reconstruction (p = 0.0006). The failure rate was found to be 13 % in patients who were younger than 25 years (61 %) and 15 % in patients who were older than 25 years (39 %).

Conclusion: The success rate of meniscal repair was found to be significantly better when ACL reconstruction was performed simultaneously with meniscal repair.

Level of evidence: Level IV.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus