Limits...
Voting at Home Is Associated with Lower Cortisol than Voting at the Polls.

Neiman J, Giuseffi K, Smith K, French J, Waismel-Manor I, Hibbing J - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Here we extend this research by investigating whether different voting modalities have differential effects on the stress response to voting.Results from a field experiment conducted during the 2012 presidential elections strongly suggest that traditional "at the polls" voting is more stressful, as measured by increases in cortisol levels, than voting at home by mail-in ballot or engaging in comparable non-political social activities.These findings imply that increased low-stress voting options such as mail-in ballots may increase political participation among individuals who are sensitive to social stressors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Political Science, University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, Iowa, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Previous research finds that voting is a socially stressful activity associated with increases in cortisol levels. Here we extend this research by investigating whether different voting modalities have differential effects on the stress response to voting. Results from a field experiment conducted during the 2012 presidential elections strongly suggest that traditional "at the polls" voting is more stressful, as measured by increases in cortisol levels, than voting at home by mail-in ballot or engaging in comparable non-political social activities. These findings imply that increased low-stress voting options such as mail-in ballots may increase political participation among individuals who are sensitive to social stressors.

No MeSH data available.


Cortisol Change by Voting Modality.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4559449&req=5

pone.0135289.g001: Cortisol Change by Voting Modality.

Mentions: The first direct test of our hypothesis is a simple one-way ANOVA to examine mean differences in cortisol change across group. Mean cortisol changes in both the control condition (mean = -.42 ng/ml, SD = 1.18) and the absentee condition (mean = -.40 ng/ml, SD = .22) were negative. This is the pattern expected if the target behaviors were having no impact on diurnal cortisol rhythms. In the poll condition, however, cortisol change was positive, with a mean increase of. 21 ng/ml increase (SD = 1.39). Differences in these means were significant, F(2,130) = 3.2, p <.05. Post hoc tests suggested the poll condition is different from the control condition (Fisher LSD p = .03, Tukey HSD p = .07, Dunnetts t with control as reference category p = .05), but that the absentee condition was not (Fisher LSD p = .94, Tukey HSD p = .99, Dunnetts t = .99). There is also some suggestion that the poll condition is different from the absentee condition (Fisher LSD = .03, Tukey HSD p = .08). The basic pattern of these results is reported in Fig 1.


Voting at Home Is Associated with Lower Cortisol than Voting at the Polls.

Neiman J, Giuseffi K, Smith K, French J, Waismel-Manor I, Hibbing J - PLoS ONE (2015)

Cortisol Change by Voting Modality.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4559449&req=5

pone.0135289.g001: Cortisol Change by Voting Modality.
Mentions: The first direct test of our hypothesis is a simple one-way ANOVA to examine mean differences in cortisol change across group. Mean cortisol changes in both the control condition (mean = -.42 ng/ml, SD = 1.18) and the absentee condition (mean = -.40 ng/ml, SD = .22) were negative. This is the pattern expected if the target behaviors were having no impact on diurnal cortisol rhythms. In the poll condition, however, cortisol change was positive, with a mean increase of. 21 ng/ml increase (SD = 1.39). Differences in these means were significant, F(2,130) = 3.2, p <.05. Post hoc tests suggested the poll condition is different from the control condition (Fisher LSD p = .03, Tukey HSD p = .07, Dunnetts t with control as reference category p = .05), but that the absentee condition was not (Fisher LSD p = .94, Tukey HSD p = .99, Dunnetts t = .99). There is also some suggestion that the poll condition is different from the absentee condition (Fisher LSD = .03, Tukey HSD p = .08). The basic pattern of these results is reported in Fig 1.

Bottom Line: Here we extend this research by investigating whether different voting modalities have differential effects on the stress response to voting.Results from a field experiment conducted during the 2012 presidential elections strongly suggest that traditional "at the polls" voting is more stressful, as measured by increases in cortisol levels, than voting at home by mail-in ballot or engaging in comparable non-political social activities.These findings imply that increased low-stress voting options such as mail-in ballots may increase political participation among individuals who are sensitive to social stressors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Political Science, University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, Iowa, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Previous research finds that voting is a socially stressful activity associated with increases in cortisol levels. Here we extend this research by investigating whether different voting modalities have differential effects on the stress response to voting. Results from a field experiment conducted during the 2012 presidential elections strongly suggest that traditional "at the polls" voting is more stressful, as measured by increases in cortisol levels, than voting at home by mail-in ballot or engaging in comparable non-political social activities. These findings imply that increased low-stress voting options such as mail-in ballots may increase political participation among individuals who are sensitive to social stressors.

No MeSH data available.