Limits...
Poor survival of females with bladder cancer is limited to those aged 70 years or over: a population-wide linkage study, New South Wales, Australia.

Patel MI, Bang A, Gillett D, Cheluvappa R, Smith DP - Cancer Med (2015)

Bottom Line: However, disease-specific survival (DSS) was worse for females compared to males with localized and regional disease (P < 0.05).In a population wide analysis, females aged 70 years or more suffer worse DSS compared to males.BC in postmenopausal females may be biologically more aggressive.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Westmead Hospital, Discipline of Surgery, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Kaplan–Meier disease-specific survival curves for localized (A), regional (B) and distant (C) disease by sex.3
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4559025&req=5

fig02: Kaplan–Meier disease-specific survival curves for localized (A), regional (B) and distant (C) disease by sex.3

Mentions: To determine if late presentation in females and hence differences in stage at presentation was the cause of higher mortality, we analyzed stage at presentation by gender (Fig.1). Five-year DSS for localized, regional, and distant disease are 75.2% (95% CI: 73.3–77.0), 44.5% (95% CI: 40.8–48.2), and 5.4% (95% CI: 2.8–8.8), respectively. Individuals with unknown stage (26%), had the same male: female ratio, age distribution and DSS as those with known stage. There were no differences in the proportion of patients presenting with localized, regional, and distant disease between males and females (P > 0.05). Analysis of DSS between males and females indicated significantly worse survival in females with localized disease (Fig.2A) (P < 0.001) and regional disease (Fig.2B) (P = 0.002), but not with metastatic disease (Fig.2C) (P = 0.09). This difference was not explained by differences in histology; although women presented with higher incidence of squamous cell carcinoma (P < 0.001) this was minor (increase of 1.4%) and could not explain the survival difference (Table1). In addition, only minor, nonsignificant differences in treatment were identified between genders (use of cystectomy, intravesical treatments, and intravenous chemotherapy) which also did not explain the differences in survival.


Poor survival of females with bladder cancer is limited to those aged 70 years or over: a population-wide linkage study, New South Wales, Australia.

Patel MI, Bang A, Gillett D, Cheluvappa R, Smith DP - Cancer Med (2015)

Kaplan–Meier disease-specific survival curves for localized (A), regional (B) and distant (C) disease by sex.3
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4559025&req=5

fig02: Kaplan–Meier disease-specific survival curves for localized (A), regional (B) and distant (C) disease by sex.3
Mentions: To determine if late presentation in females and hence differences in stage at presentation was the cause of higher mortality, we analyzed stage at presentation by gender (Fig.1). Five-year DSS for localized, regional, and distant disease are 75.2% (95% CI: 73.3–77.0), 44.5% (95% CI: 40.8–48.2), and 5.4% (95% CI: 2.8–8.8), respectively. Individuals with unknown stage (26%), had the same male: female ratio, age distribution and DSS as those with known stage. There were no differences in the proportion of patients presenting with localized, regional, and distant disease between males and females (P > 0.05). Analysis of DSS between males and females indicated significantly worse survival in females with localized disease (Fig.2A) (P < 0.001) and regional disease (Fig.2B) (P = 0.002), but not with metastatic disease (Fig.2C) (P = 0.09). This difference was not explained by differences in histology; although women presented with higher incidence of squamous cell carcinoma (P < 0.001) this was minor (increase of 1.4%) and could not explain the survival difference (Table1). In addition, only minor, nonsignificant differences in treatment were identified between genders (use of cystectomy, intravesical treatments, and intravenous chemotherapy) which also did not explain the differences in survival.

Bottom Line: However, disease-specific survival (DSS) was worse for females compared to males with localized and regional disease (P < 0.05).In a population wide analysis, females aged 70 years or more suffer worse DSS compared to males.BC in postmenopausal females may be biologically more aggressive.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Westmead Hospital, Discipline of Surgery, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus