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Population Genomics of Infectious and Integrated Wolbachia pipientis Genomes in Drosophila ananassae.

Choi JY, Bubnell JE, Aquadro CF - Genome Biol Evol (2015)

Bottom Line: Coevolution between Drosophila and its endosymbiont Wolbachia pipientis has many intriguing aspects.Further analysis revealed that for all D. ananassae we examined with the integrated wAna genomes, the majority of the integrated wAna genomic regions is represented in at least two copies suggesting a double integration or single integration followed by an integrated genome duplication.The possible evolutionary mechanism underlying the widespread geographical presence of the duplicate integration of the wAna genome is an intriguing question remaining to be answered.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Cornell University jc2439@cornell.edu.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Maximum-likelihood phylogeny of the (A) host D. ananassae mtDNA and (B) wAna genomes. Bootstrap values of greater than 95% are shown on the nodes of the phylogeny. Drosophila ananassae strains with wAnaINF are indicated with black colored branches, whereas those with wAnaITG are indicated with red colored branches. Both trees are midpoint rooted.
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evv158-F6: Maximum-likelihood phylogeny of the (A) host D. ananassae mtDNA and (B) wAna genomes. Bootstrap values of greater than 95% are shown on the nodes of the phylogeny. Drosophila ananassae strains with wAnaINF are indicated with black colored branches, whereas those with wAnaITG are indicated with red colored branches. Both trees are midpoint rooted.

Mentions: Qualitatively the mtDNA genome phylogeny (fig. 6A) was concordant with the mtDNA phylogeny from the study of Choi and Aquadro (2014), which was estimated using the same D. ananassae samples from this study but with Sanger sequences of only three mtDNA genes. No evidence of phylogenetic clustering was observed among the mtDNA haplotypes originating from D. ananassae strains with the wAnaINF or wAnaITG genomes.Fig. 6.—


Population Genomics of Infectious and Integrated Wolbachia pipientis Genomes in Drosophila ananassae.

Choi JY, Bubnell JE, Aquadro CF - Genome Biol Evol (2015)

Maximum-likelihood phylogeny of the (A) host D. ananassae mtDNA and (B) wAna genomes. Bootstrap values of greater than 95% are shown on the nodes of the phylogeny. Drosophila ananassae strains with wAnaINF are indicated with black colored branches, whereas those with wAnaITG are indicated with red colored branches. Both trees are midpoint rooted.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4558871&req=5

evv158-F6: Maximum-likelihood phylogeny of the (A) host D. ananassae mtDNA and (B) wAna genomes. Bootstrap values of greater than 95% are shown on the nodes of the phylogeny. Drosophila ananassae strains with wAnaINF are indicated with black colored branches, whereas those with wAnaITG are indicated with red colored branches. Both trees are midpoint rooted.
Mentions: Qualitatively the mtDNA genome phylogeny (fig. 6A) was concordant with the mtDNA phylogeny from the study of Choi and Aquadro (2014), which was estimated using the same D. ananassae samples from this study but with Sanger sequences of only three mtDNA genes. No evidence of phylogenetic clustering was observed among the mtDNA haplotypes originating from D. ananassae strains with the wAnaINF or wAnaITG genomes.Fig. 6.—

Bottom Line: Coevolution between Drosophila and its endosymbiont Wolbachia pipientis has many intriguing aspects.Further analysis revealed that for all D. ananassae we examined with the integrated wAna genomes, the majority of the integrated wAna genomic regions is represented in at least two copies suggesting a double integration or single integration followed by an integrated genome duplication.The possible evolutionary mechanism underlying the widespread geographical presence of the duplicate integration of the wAna genome is an intriguing question remaining to be answered.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Cornell University jc2439@cornell.edu.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus