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Timing and Risk Factors for a Positive Fecal Immunochemical Test in Subsequent Screening for Colorectal Neoplasms.

Chiang TH, Lee YC, Liao WC, Chung JH, Chiu HM, Tu CH, Chen SC, Wu MS - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: To identify risk factors associated with a positive result in subsequent screening.Following a negative test, older age and male gender are risk factors for a positive result in the subsequent rounds while the gender difference diminishes with age.Biennial screening is sufficient following a negative fecal test.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan; Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan; Department of Integrated Diagnostics and Therapeutics, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Following a negative test, the performance of fecal immunochemical testing in the subsequent screening round is rarely reported. It is crucial to allocate resources to participants who are more likely to test positive subsequently following an initial negative result.

Objective: To identify risk factors associated with a positive result in subsequent screening.

Methods: Dataset was composed of consecutive participants who voluntarily underwent fecal tests and colonoscopy in a routine medical examination at the National Taiwan University Hospital between January 2007 and December 2011. Risk factor assessment of positive fecal test in subsequent screening was performed by using the Cox proportional hazards models.

Results: Our cohort consisted of 3783 participants during a 5-year period. In three rounds of subsequent testing, 3783, 1537, and 624 participants underwent fecal tests, respectively; 5.7%, 5.1%, and 3.9% tested positive, respectively, and the positive predictive values were 40.2%, 20.3%, and 20.8%, respectively. Age ≥60 years (adjusted hazard ratio: 1.53, 95% CI: 1.21-1.93) and male gender (1.32, 95% CI: 1.02-1.69) were risk factors; however, an interaction between age and gender was noted. Men had higher risk than women when they were <60 years of age (p = 0.002), while this difference was no longer observed when ≥60 years of age (p = 0.74). The optimal interval of screening timing for participant with baseline negative fecal test was 2 years.

Conclusions: Following a negative test, older age and male gender are risk factors for a positive result in the subsequent rounds while the gender difference diminishes with age. Biennial screening is sufficient following a negative fecal test.

No MeSH data available.


Flow diagram of enrollment.
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pone.0136890.g001: Flow diagram of enrollment.

Mentions: The study flow is shown in Fig 1. Among 30117 participants with 45625 fecal tests, a total of 14411 participants were included in the evaluation of baseline FIT performance, and 3783 participants who participated in subsequent rounds were included in the risk factor analyses. There were 14411 (54.8% male), 3783 (63.6% male), 1537 (69.9% male), and 624 (74.2% male) participants participating in the first, second, third, and fourth rounds, respectively, and their mean ages were similarly around 59 years. During a 5-year follow-up period with 9922 fecal tests and 9183 person-years, 302 participants tested positive.


Timing and Risk Factors for a Positive Fecal Immunochemical Test in Subsequent Screening for Colorectal Neoplasms.

Chiang TH, Lee YC, Liao WC, Chung JH, Chiu HM, Tu CH, Chen SC, Wu MS - PLoS ONE (2015)

Flow diagram of enrollment.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4558044&req=5

pone.0136890.g001: Flow diagram of enrollment.
Mentions: The study flow is shown in Fig 1. Among 30117 participants with 45625 fecal tests, a total of 14411 participants were included in the evaluation of baseline FIT performance, and 3783 participants who participated in subsequent rounds were included in the risk factor analyses. There were 14411 (54.8% male), 3783 (63.6% male), 1537 (69.9% male), and 624 (74.2% male) participants participating in the first, second, third, and fourth rounds, respectively, and their mean ages were similarly around 59 years. During a 5-year follow-up period with 9922 fecal tests and 9183 person-years, 302 participants tested positive.

Bottom Line: To identify risk factors associated with a positive result in subsequent screening.Following a negative test, older age and male gender are risk factors for a positive result in the subsequent rounds while the gender difference diminishes with age.Biennial screening is sufficient following a negative fecal test.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan; Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan; Department of Integrated Diagnostics and Therapeutics, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Following a negative test, the performance of fecal immunochemical testing in the subsequent screening round is rarely reported. It is crucial to allocate resources to participants who are more likely to test positive subsequently following an initial negative result.

Objective: To identify risk factors associated with a positive result in subsequent screening.

Methods: Dataset was composed of consecutive participants who voluntarily underwent fecal tests and colonoscopy in a routine medical examination at the National Taiwan University Hospital between January 2007 and December 2011. Risk factor assessment of positive fecal test in subsequent screening was performed by using the Cox proportional hazards models.

Results: Our cohort consisted of 3783 participants during a 5-year period. In three rounds of subsequent testing, 3783, 1537, and 624 participants underwent fecal tests, respectively; 5.7%, 5.1%, and 3.9% tested positive, respectively, and the positive predictive values were 40.2%, 20.3%, and 20.8%, respectively. Age ≥60 years (adjusted hazard ratio: 1.53, 95% CI: 1.21-1.93) and male gender (1.32, 95% CI: 1.02-1.69) were risk factors; however, an interaction between age and gender was noted. Men had higher risk than women when they were <60 years of age (p = 0.002), while this difference was no longer observed when ≥60 years of age (p = 0.74). The optimal interval of screening timing for participant with baseline negative fecal test was 2 years.

Conclusions: Following a negative test, older age and male gender are risk factors for a positive result in the subsequent rounds while the gender difference diminishes with age. Biennial screening is sufficient following a negative fecal test.

No MeSH data available.