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Variability in Vowel Production within and between Days.

Heald SL, Nusbaum HC - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: We measured naturally occurring acoustic variability in speech production at nine specific time points (three per day over three days) to examine daily change in production as well as change across days for citation-form vowels.Results indicate significant systematic change in F1 and F0 values over the course of a day for each of the seven vowels recorded, whereas F2 and F3 remained stable.Despite this systematic change within a day, however, talkers did not show significant changes in F0, F1, F2, and F3 between days, demonstrating that speakers are capable of producing vowels with great reliability over days without any extrinsic feedback besides their own auditory monitoring.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Although the acoustic variability of speech is often described as a problem for phonetic recognition, there is little research examining acoustic-phonetic variability over time. We measured naturally occurring acoustic variability in speech production at nine specific time points (three per day over three days) to examine daily change in production as well as change across days for citation-form vowels. Productions of seven different vowels (/EE/, /IH/, /AH/, /UH/, /AE/, /OO/, /EH/) were recorded at 9AM, 3PM and 9PM over the course of each testing day on three different days, every other day, over a span of five days. Results indicate significant systematic change in F1 and F0 values over the course of a day for each of the seven vowels recorded, whereas F2 and F3 remained stable. Despite this systematic change within a day, however, talkers did not show significant changes in F0, F1, F2, and F3 between days, demonstrating that speakers are capable of producing vowels with great reliability over days without any extrinsic feedback besides their own auditory monitoring. The data show that in spite of substantial day-to-day variability in the specific listening and speaking experiences of these participants and thus exposure to different acoustic tokens of speech, there is a high degree of internal precision and consistency for the production of citation form vowels.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean F0 values at three different times (Morning (M), Afternoon (A) and Evening (E)) for each vowel tested across subjects.As indicated by an average standard error of 19.54 Hz over the course day, there is high precision in isolated citation-form vowel production.
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pone.0136791.g003: Mean F0 values at three different times (Morning (M), Afternoon (A) and Evening (E)) for each vowel tested across subjects.As indicated by an average standard error of 19.54 Hz over the course day, there is high precision in isolated citation-form vowel production.

Mentions: A significant increase in F0 was also found over the course of a day, such that F0 increased by 9.42 Hz over the course of the day (See Fig 3) [F0 Time point within a day effect: F(2,14) = 6.79, p < .01]. An LSD post hoc contrast among the three time points (morning, afternoon and evening) yielded only a significant difference between the morning and afternoon sessions (Mean increase of 9.4 Hz, p < .001), the typical daytime nadir point in circadian rhythm for most of our participants [33–36]. This result is generally consistent with the rise in pitch induced by an increase in vocal productions (via fatigue or overuse) found in studies such as Gelfer et al. [37] and Stemple et al. [38].


Variability in Vowel Production within and between Days.

Heald SL, Nusbaum HC - PLoS ONE (2015)

Mean F0 values at three different times (Morning (M), Afternoon (A) and Evening (E)) for each vowel tested across subjects.As indicated by an average standard error of 19.54 Hz over the course day, there is high precision in isolated citation-form vowel production.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4558024&req=5

pone.0136791.g003: Mean F0 values at three different times (Morning (M), Afternoon (A) and Evening (E)) for each vowel tested across subjects.As indicated by an average standard error of 19.54 Hz over the course day, there is high precision in isolated citation-form vowel production.
Mentions: A significant increase in F0 was also found over the course of a day, such that F0 increased by 9.42 Hz over the course of the day (See Fig 3) [F0 Time point within a day effect: F(2,14) = 6.79, p < .01]. An LSD post hoc contrast among the three time points (morning, afternoon and evening) yielded only a significant difference between the morning and afternoon sessions (Mean increase of 9.4 Hz, p < .001), the typical daytime nadir point in circadian rhythm for most of our participants [33–36]. This result is generally consistent with the rise in pitch induced by an increase in vocal productions (via fatigue or overuse) found in studies such as Gelfer et al. [37] and Stemple et al. [38].

Bottom Line: We measured naturally occurring acoustic variability in speech production at nine specific time points (three per day over three days) to examine daily change in production as well as change across days for citation-form vowels.Results indicate significant systematic change in F1 and F0 values over the course of a day for each of the seven vowels recorded, whereas F2 and F3 remained stable.Despite this systematic change within a day, however, talkers did not show significant changes in F0, F1, F2, and F3 between days, demonstrating that speakers are capable of producing vowels with great reliability over days without any extrinsic feedback besides their own auditory monitoring.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Although the acoustic variability of speech is often described as a problem for phonetic recognition, there is little research examining acoustic-phonetic variability over time. We measured naturally occurring acoustic variability in speech production at nine specific time points (three per day over three days) to examine daily change in production as well as change across days for citation-form vowels. Productions of seven different vowels (/EE/, /IH/, /AH/, /UH/, /AE/, /OO/, /EH/) were recorded at 9AM, 3PM and 9PM over the course of each testing day on three different days, every other day, over a span of five days. Results indicate significant systematic change in F1 and F0 values over the course of a day for each of the seven vowels recorded, whereas F2 and F3 remained stable. Despite this systematic change within a day, however, talkers did not show significant changes in F0, F1, F2, and F3 between days, demonstrating that speakers are capable of producing vowels with great reliability over days without any extrinsic feedback besides their own auditory monitoring. The data show that in spite of substantial day-to-day variability in the specific listening and speaking experiences of these participants and thus exposure to different acoustic tokens of speech, there is a high degree of internal precision and consistency for the production of citation form vowels.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus