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Implications of ethylene biosynthesis and signaling in soybean drought stress tolerance.

Arraes FB, Beneventi MA, Lisei de Sa ME, Paixao JF, Albuquerque EV, Marin SR, Purgatto E, Nepomuceno AL, Grossi-de-Sa MF - BMC Plant Biol. (2015)

Bottom Line: A model to predict these routes in soybean was proposed, and it had great representability compared to those described for Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa.The in silico analysis, combined with the quantification of ethylene production (and its precursor) and RT-qPCR experiments, allowed for a better understanding of the importance of ethylene at a molecular level in this crop as well as its role in the response to abiotic stresses.The integration of in silico and physiological data could also contribute to the application of biotechnological strategies to the development of improved cultivars with regard to different stresses, such as the isolation of stress-specific plant promoters.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Campus do Vale, Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, Postal Code 15005, CEP 91501-970, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil. fabricio.arraes@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Ethylene is a phytohormone known for inducing a triple response in seedlings, leaf abscission and other responses to various stresses. Several studies in model plants have evaluated the importance of this hormone in crosstalk signaling with different metabolic pathways, in addition to responses to biotic stresses. However, the mechanism of action in plants of agricultural interest, such as soybean, and its participation in abiotic stresses remain unclear.

Results: The studies presented in this work allowed for the identification of 176 soybean genes described elsewhere for ethylene biosynthesis (108 genes) and signal transduction (68 genes). A model to predict these routes in soybean was proposed, and it had great representability compared to those described for Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa. Furthermore, analysis of putative gene promoters from soybean gene orthologs permitted the identification of 29 families of cis-acting elements. These elements are essential for ethylene-mediated regulation and its possible crosstalk with other signaling pathways mediated by other plant hormones. From genes that are differentially expressed in the transcriptome database, we analyzed the relative expression of some selected genes in resistant and tolerant soybean plants subjected to water deficit. The differential expression of a set of five soybean ethylene-related genes (MAT, ACS, ACO, ETR and CTR) was validated with RT-qPCR experiments, which confirmed variations in the expression of these soybean target genes, as identified in the transcriptome database. In particular, two families of ethylene biosynthesis genes (ACS and ACO) were upregulated under these experimental conditions, whereas CTR (involved in ethylene signal transduction) was downregulated. In the same samples, high levels of ethylene production were detected and were directly correlated with the free fraction levels of ethylene's precursor. Thus, the combination of these data indicated the involvement of ethylene biosynthesis and signaling in soybean responses to water stress.

Conclusions: The in silico analysis, combined with the quantification of ethylene production (and its precursor) and RT-qPCR experiments, allowed for a better understanding of the importance of ethylene at a molecular level in this crop as well as its role in the response to abiotic stresses. In summary, all of the data presented here suggested that soybean responses to water stress could be regulated by a crosstalk network among different signaling pathways, which might involve various phytohormones, such as auxins, ABA and jasmonic acid. The integration of in silico and physiological data could also contribute to the application of biotechnological strategies to the development of improved cultivars with regard to different stresses, such as the isolation of stress-specific plant promoters.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Distribution of cis-Acting Elements in Putative Soybean Gene Promoters. The graph shows the distribution of cis-acting elements in promoter regions of soybean genes, related to ethylene biosynthesis and signal transduction. The cis-acting element families identified were as follows: ABRE (ABA response elements); AREF (auxin response elements); ATAF (ATAF-like NAC domain containing proteins); BRRE (brassinosteroid response elements); CAAT (CCAAT binding factors); CDC5 (A. thaliana CDC5 homologs); CE1F (coupling elements 1 binding factors); CNAC (calcium regulated NAC-factors); DPBF (Dc3 promoter binding factors); DREB (dehydration responsive element binding factors); EINL (ethylene insensitive 3 like factors); EREF (ethylene response element factors); FLO2 (floral homeotic protein APETALA2); GARP (MYB-related DNA binding proteins - Golden2, ARR, Psr); GBOX (plant G-box/C-box bZIP proteins); GCCF (GCC-box family); HEAT (heat shock factors); JARE (jasmonate response elements); LREM (light responsive element motifs, not modulated by different light qualities); MIIG (MYB IIG-type binding sites); MYBL (MYB-like proteins); MYBS (MYB proteins with single DNA binding repeat); MYCL (MYC-like basic helix-loop-helix binding factors); NACF (plant specific NAC transcriptional factors); PTBP (plant TATA binding protein factors); RAV3 (3’-part of bipartite RAV1 binding site); RAV5 (5’-part of bipartite RAV1 binding site); SALT (salt/drought responsive elements); SWNS (secondary wall NACS)
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Fig3: Distribution of cis-Acting Elements in Putative Soybean Gene Promoters. The graph shows the distribution of cis-acting elements in promoter regions of soybean genes, related to ethylene biosynthesis and signal transduction. The cis-acting element families identified were as follows: ABRE (ABA response elements); AREF (auxin response elements); ATAF (ATAF-like NAC domain containing proteins); BRRE (brassinosteroid response elements); CAAT (CCAAT binding factors); CDC5 (A. thaliana CDC5 homologs); CE1F (coupling elements 1 binding factors); CNAC (calcium regulated NAC-factors); DPBF (Dc3 promoter binding factors); DREB (dehydration responsive element binding factors); EINL (ethylene insensitive 3 like factors); EREF (ethylene response element factors); FLO2 (floral homeotic protein APETALA2); GARP (MYB-related DNA binding proteins - Golden2, ARR, Psr); GBOX (plant G-box/C-box bZIP proteins); GCCF (GCC-box family); HEAT (heat shock factors); JARE (jasmonate response elements); LREM (light responsive element motifs, not modulated by different light qualities); MIIG (MYB IIG-type binding sites); MYBL (MYB-like proteins); MYBS (MYB proteins with single DNA binding repeat); MYCL (MYC-like basic helix-loop-helix binding factors); NACF (plant specific NAC transcriptional factors); PTBP (plant TATA binding protein factors); RAV3 (3’-part of bipartite RAV1 binding site); RAV5 (5’-part of bipartite RAV1 binding site); SALT (salt/drought responsive elements); SWNS (secondary wall NACS)

Mentions: To understand better their transcriptional regulation mechanisms, we performed an in silico analysis of the putative promoter regions of the 176 soybean genes. We identified 14,385 elements in these putative promoters, corresponding to 29 cis-acting element families described in the literature for their transcriptional regulation in different plant species (Fig. 3; Additional file 4: Table S9).Fig. 3


Implications of ethylene biosynthesis and signaling in soybean drought stress tolerance.

Arraes FB, Beneventi MA, Lisei de Sa ME, Paixao JF, Albuquerque EV, Marin SR, Purgatto E, Nepomuceno AL, Grossi-de-Sa MF - BMC Plant Biol. (2015)

Distribution of cis-Acting Elements in Putative Soybean Gene Promoters. The graph shows the distribution of cis-acting elements in promoter regions of soybean genes, related to ethylene biosynthesis and signal transduction. The cis-acting element families identified were as follows: ABRE (ABA response elements); AREF (auxin response elements); ATAF (ATAF-like NAC domain containing proteins); BRRE (brassinosteroid response elements); CAAT (CCAAT binding factors); CDC5 (A. thaliana CDC5 homologs); CE1F (coupling elements 1 binding factors); CNAC (calcium regulated NAC-factors); DPBF (Dc3 promoter binding factors); DREB (dehydration responsive element binding factors); EINL (ethylene insensitive 3 like factors); EREF (ethylene response element factors); FLO2 (floral homeotic protein APETALA2); GARP (MYB-related DNA binding proteins - Golden2, ARR, Psr); GBOX (plant G-box/C-box bZIP proteins); GCCF (GCC-box family); HEAT (heat shock factors); JARE (jasmonate response elements); LREM (light responsive element motifs, not modulated by different light qualities); MIIG (MYB IIG-type binding sites); MYBL (MYB-like proteins); MYBS (MYB proteins with single DNA binding repeat); MYCL (MYC-like basic helix-loop-helix binding factors); NACF (plant specific NAC transcriptional factors); PTBP (plant TATA binding protein factors); RAV3 (3’-part of bipartite RAV1 binding site); RAV5 (5’-part of bipartite RAV1 binding site); SALT (salt/drought responsive elements); SWNS (secondary wall NACS)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4557918&req=5

Fig3: Distribution of cis-Acting Elements in Putative Soybean Gene Promoters. The graph shows the distribution of cis-acting elements in promoter regions of soybean genes, related to ethylene biosynthesis and signal transduction. The cis-acting element families identified were as follows: ABRE (ABA response elements); AREF (auxin response elements); ATAF (ATAF-like NAC domain containing proteins); BRRE (brassinosteroid response elements); CAAT (CCAAT binding factors); CDC5 (A. thaliana CDC5 homologs); CE1F (coupling elements 1 binding factors); CNAC (calcium regulated NAC-factors); DPBF (Dc3 promoter binding factors); DREB (dehydration responsive element binding factors); EINL (ethylene insensitive 3 like factors); EREF (ethylene response element factors); FLO2 (floral homeotic protein APETALA2); GARP (MYB-related DNA binding proteins - Golden2, ARR, Psr); GBOX (plant G-box/C-box bZIP proteins); GCCF (GCC-box family); HEAT (heat shock factors); JARE (jasmonate response elements); LREM (light responsive element motifs, not modulated by different light qualities); MIIG (MYB IIG-type binding sites); MYBL (MYB-like proteins); MYBS (MYB proteins with single DNA binding repeat); MYCL (MYC-like basic helix-loop-helix binding factors); NACF (plant specific NAC transcriptional factors); PTBP (plant TATA binding protein factors); RAV3 (3’-part of bipartite RAV1 binding site); RAV5 (5’-part of bipartite RAV1 binding site); SALT (salt/drought responsive elements); SWNS (secondary wall NACS)
Mentions: To understand better their transcriptional regulation mechanisms, we performed an in silico analysis of the putative promoter regions of the 176 soybean genes. We identified 14,385 elements in these putative promoters, corresponding to 29 cis-acting element families described in the literature for their transcriptional regulation in different plant species (Fig. 3; Additional file 4: Table S9).Fig. 3

Bottom Line: A model to predict these routes in soybean was proposed, and it had great representability compared to those described for Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa.The in silico analysis, combined with the quantification of ethylene production (and its precursor) and RT-qPCR experiments, allowed for a better understanding of the importance of ethylene at a molecular level in this crop as well as its role in the response to abiotic stresses.The integration of in silico and physiological data could also contribute to the application of biotechnological strategies to the development of improved cultivars with regard to different stresses, such as the isolation of stress-specific plant promoters.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Campus do Vale, Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, Postal Code 15005, CEP 91501-970, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil. fabricio.arraes@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Ethylene is a phytohormone known for inducing a triple response in seedlings, leaf abscission and other responses to various stresses. Several studies in model plants have evaluated the importance of this hormone in crosstalk signaling with different metabolic pathways, in addition to responses to biotic stresses. However, the mechanism of action in plants of agricultural interest, such as soybean, and its participation in abiotic stresses remain unclear.

Results: The studies presented in this work allowed for the identification of 176 soybean genes described elsewhere for ethylene biosynthesis (108 genes) and signal transduction (68 genes). A model to predict these routes in soybean was proposed, and it had great representability compared to those described for Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa. Furthermore, analysis of putative gene promoters from soybean gene orthologs permitted the identification of 29 families of cis-acting elements. These elements are essential for ethylene-mediated regulation and its possible crosstalk with other signaling pathways mediated by other plant hormones. From genes that are differentially expressed in the transcriptome database, we analyzed the relative expression of some selected genes in resistant and tolerant soybean plants subjected to water deficit. The differential expression of a set of five soybean ethylene-related genes (MAT, ACS, ACO, ETR and CTR) was validated with RT-qPCR experiments, which confirmed variations in the expression of these soybean target genes, as identified in the transcriptome database. In particular, two families of ethylene biosynthesis genes (ACS and ACO) were upregulated under these experimental conditions, whereas CTR (involved in ethylene signal transduction) was downregulated. In the same samples, high levels of ethylene production were detected and were directly correlated with the free fraction levels of ethylene's precursor. Thus, the combination of these data indicated the involvement of ethylene biosynthesis and signaling in soybean responses to water stress.

Conclusions: The in silico analysis, combined with the quantification of ethylene production (and its precursor) and RT-qPCR experiments, allowed for a better understanding of the importance of ethylene at a molecular level in this crop as well as its role in the response to abiotic stresses. In summary, all of the data presented here suggested that soybean responses to water stress could be regulated by a crosstalk network among different signaling pathways, which might involve various phytohormones, such as auxins, ABA and jasmonic acid. The integration of in silico and physiological data could also contribute to the application of biotechnological strategies to the development of improved cultivars with regard to different stresses, such as the isolation of stress-specific plant promoters.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus