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Conjugated polyelectrolyte hole transport layer for inverted-type perovskite solar cells.

Choi H, Mai CK, Kim HB, Jeong J, Song S, Bazan GC, Kim JY, Heeger AJ - Nat Commun (2015)

Bottom Line: Although efficiencies of perovskite solar cells have dramatically improved up to 19% within the past 5 years, there is still considerable room for further improvement in device efficiency and stability through development of novel materials and device architectures.Here we demonstrate that inverted-type perovskite solar cells with pH-neutral and low-temperature solution-processable conjugated polyelectrolyte as the hole transport layer (instead of acidic PSS) exhibit a device efficiency of over 12% and improved device stability in air.As an alternative to PSS, this work is the first report on the use of an organic hole transport material that enables the formation of uniform perovskite films with complete surface coverage and the demonstration of efficient, stable perovskite/fullerene planar heterojunction solar cells.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemistry, College of Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT

Unlabelled: Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite materials offer the potential for realization of low-cost and flexible next-generation solar cells fabricated by low-temperature solution processing. Although efficiencies of perovskite solar cells have dramatically improved up to 19% within the past 5 years, there is still considerable room for further improvement in device efficiency and stability through development of novel materials and device architectures. Here we demonstrate that inverted-type perovskite solar cells with pH-neutral and low-temperature solution-processable conjugated polyelectrolyte as the hole transport layer (instead of acidic

Pedot: PSS) exhibit a device efficiency of over 12% and improved device stability in air. As an alternative to

Pedot: PSS, this work is the first report on the use of an organic hole transport material that enables the formation of uniform perovskite films with complete surface coverage and the demonstration of efficient, stable perovskite/fullerene planar heterojunction solar cells.

No MeSH data available.


Effect of PEDOT:PSS and CPE-K on optical property and perovskite crystallinity.(a) Comparison of transmittance between PEDOT:PSS and CPE-K on the ITO substrate. (b) XRD patterns of perovskite films on PEDOT:PSS and CPE-K layer.
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f1: Effect of PEDOT:PSS and CPE-K on optical property and perovskite crystallinity.(a) Comparison of transmittance between PEDOT:PSS and CPE-K on the ITO substrate. (b) XRD patterns of perovskite films on PEDOT:PSS and CPE-K layer.

Mentions: We first compared the transmittance of PEDOT:PSS and CPE-K and absorption of perovskite films coated on top of them. Figure 1a provides the transmittance spectra of PEDOT:PSS and CPE-K films spin-coated on ITO substrates. Bare ITO is also included for comparison. Compared with PEDOT:PSS, CPE-K showed lower transmittance in the range of 350–500 and 600–850 nm because of its narrow bandgap (1.4 eV)18. Before depositing perovskite films on different substrates, we tested whether the CPE-K film is washed out by the solvent used for perovskite precursor deposition, namely N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF). Although the absorption of the CPE-K film was slightly reduced after spin-coating from DMF (Supplementary Fig. 2), the perovskite film can be deposited on CPE-K without complete removal of the underlayer, as confirmed by the absorption spectra of MAPbI3−XClX perovskite films spin-coated on PEDOT:PSS and CPE-K (Supplementary Fig. 3). Perovskite films on CPE-K exhibited slightly higher optical density than perovskite on PEDOT:PSS in the range of 500–850 nm because of absorption of CPE-K (Inset of Supplementary Fig. 2). Regardless of substrates, both perovskite films with the thickness of 250±20 nm exhibited broad and high light absorption in the visible wavelength region.


Conjugated polyelectrolyte hole transport layer for inverted-type perovskite solar cells.

Choi H, Mai CK, Kim HB, Jeong J, Song S, Bazan GC, Kim JY, Heeger AJ - Nat Commun (2015)

Effect of PEDOT:PSS and CPE-K on optical property and perovskite crystallinity.(a) Comparison of transmittance between PEDOT:PSS and CPE-K on the ITO substrate. (b) XRD patterns of perovskite films on PEDOT:PSS and CPE-K layer.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4557298&req=5

f1: Effect of PEDOT:PSS and CPE-K on optical property and perovskite crystallinity.(a) Comparison of transmittance between PEDOT:PSS and CPE-K on the ITO substrate. (b) XRD patterns of perovskite films on PEDOT:PSS and CPE-K layer.
Mentions: We first compared the transmittance of PEDOT:PSS and CPE-K and absorption of perovskite films coated on top of them. Figure 1a provides the transmittance spectra of PEDOT:PSS and CPE-K films spin-coated on ITO substrates. Bare ITO is also included for comparison. Compared with PEDOT:PSS, CPE-K showed lower transmittance in the range of 350–500 and 600–850 nm because of its narrow bandgap (1.4 eV)18. Before depositing perovskite films on different substrates, we tested whether the CPE-K film is washed out by the solvent used for perovskite precursor deposition, namely N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF). Although the absorption of the CPE-K film was slightly reduced after spin-coating from DMF (Supplementary Fig. 2), the perovskite film can be deposited on CPE-K without complete removal of the underlayer, as confirmed by the absorption spectra of MAPbI3−XClX perovskite films spin-coated on PEDOT:PSS and CPE-K (Supplementary Fig. 3). Perovskite films on CPE-K exhibited slightly higher optical density than perovskite on PEDOT:PSS in the range of 500–850 nm because of absorption of CPE-K (Inset of Supplementary Fig. 2). Regardless of substrates, both perovskite films with the thickness of 250±20 nm exhibited broad and high light absorption in the visible wavelength region.

Bottom Line: Although efficiencies of perovskite solar cells have dramatically improved up to 19% within the past 5 years, there is still considerable room for further improvement in device efficiency and stability through development of novel materials and device architectures.Here we demonstrate that inverted-type perovskite solar cells with pH-neutral and low-temperature solution-processable conjugated polyelectrolyte as the hole transport layer (instead of acidic PSS) exhibit a device efficiency of over 12% and improved device stability in air.As an alternative to PSS, this work is the first report on the use of an organic hole transport material that enables the formation of uniform perovskite films with complete surface coverage and the demonstration of efficient, stable perovskite/fullerene planar heterojunction solar cells.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemistry, College of Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT

Unlabelled: Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite materials offer the potential for realization of low-cost and flexible next-generation solar cells fabricated by low-temperature solution processing. Although efficiencies of perovskite solar cells have dramatically improved up to 19% within the past 5 years, there is still considerable room for further improvement in device efficiency and stability through development of novel materials and device architectures. Here we demonstrate that inverted-type perovskite solar cells with pH-neutral and low-temperature solution-processable conjugated polyelectrolyte as the hole transport layer (instead of acidic

Pedot: PSS) exhibit a device efficiency of over 12% and improved device stability in air. As an alternative to

Pedot: PSS, this work is the first report on the use of an organic hole transport material that enables the formation of uniform perovskite films with complete surface coverage and the demonstration of efficient, stable perovskite/fullerene planar heterojunction solar cells.

No MeSH data available.