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Gender differences in crowd perception.

Bai Y, Leib AY, Puri AM, Whitney D, Peng K - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: In this study, we investigated whether the first impression of a crowd of faces-crowd perception-is influenced by social background and cognitive processing.Furthermore, the results showed that females were generally more accurate in estimating the average identity of a crowd.Overall, the results suggest that group perception is not an isolated or uniform cognitive mechanism, but rather one that interacts with biological and social processes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of California, Berkeley Berkeley, CA, USA.

ABSTRACT
In this study, we investigated whether the first impression of a crowd of faces-crowd perception-is influenced by social background and cognitive processing. Specifically, we explored whether males and females, two groups that are distinct biologically and socially, differ in their ability to extract ensemble characteristics from crowds of faces that were comprised of different identities. Participants were presented with crowds of similar faces and were instructed to scroll through a morphed continuum of faces until they found a face that was representative of the average identity of each crowd. Consistent with previous research, females were more precise in single face perception. Furthermore, the results showed that females were generally more accurate in estimating the average identity of a crowd. However, the correlation between single face discrimination and crowd averaging differed between males and females. Specifically, male subjects' ensemble integration slightly compensated for their poor single face perception; their performance on the crowd perception task was not as poor as would be expected from their single face discrimination ability. Overall, the results suggest that group perception is not an isolated or uniform cognitive mechanism, but rather one that interacts with biological and social processes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Results of Experiments 2a and 2b. (A) Relationship between single face discrimination and perception of crowds of redundant upright faces (crowds contained repeated pictures of four identities on each trial) for males and females in Experiment 2a. Crowd face perception AEE was the average AEE for the 4, 8, and 12 face conditions. (B) Relationship between single face discrimination and redundant upright crowd face perception for all females and the subset of males who had an equivalent single face perception as females in Experiment 2a. (C) Relationship between single face discrimination and non-redundant upright crowd face perception for males and females in Experiment 2b.
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Figure 3: Results of Experiments 2a and 2b. (A) Relationship between single face discrimination and perception of crowds of redundant upright faces (crowds contained repeated pictures of four identities on each trial) for males and females in Experiment 2a. Crowd face perception AEE was the average AEE for the 4, 8, and 12 face conditions. (B) Relationship between single face discrimination and redundant upright crowd face perception for all females and the subset of males who had an equivalent single face perception as females in Experiment 2a. (C) Relationship between single face discrimination and non-redundant upright crowd face perception for males and females in Experiment 2b.

Mentions: In this experiment, in contrast to the single face condition, the other three conditions required participants to ensemble code the crowd in order to provide a more precise average estimation. In order to test the relationship between single face detection and ensemble coding of crowds, we collapsed the 4, 8, and 12 upright face conditions together and performed the same linear regression described in Experiment 1 (Figure 3A) using each subject's AEE for the single upright face condition as Y and AEE for the multi upright face condition (collapsed across 4, 8, and 12 upright faces conditions) as X. The results again showed that males had a steeper slope compared to females (bmale = 0.811; bfemale = 0.495), and a permutation test showed that this difference was significant (p < 0.001). This indicates that, despite their relatively poor sensitivity to single faces, male subjects' sensitivity to crowd identity was relatively high.


Gender differences in crowd perception.

Bai Y, Leib AY, Puri AM, Whitney D, Peng K - Front Psychol (2015)

Results of Experiments 2a and 2b. (A) Relationship between single face discrimination and perception of crowds of redundant upright faces (crowds contained repeated pictures of four identities on each trial) for males and females in Experiment 2a. Crowd face perception AEE was the average AEE for the 4, 8, and 12 face conditions. (B) Relationship between single face discrimination and redundant upright crowd face perception for all females and the subset of males who had an equivalent single face perception as females in Experiment 2a. (C) Relationship between single face discrimination and non-redundant upright crowd face perception for males and females in Experiment 2b.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4557101&req=5

Figure 3: Results of Experiments 2a and 2b. (A) Relationship between single face discrimination and perception of crowds of redundant upright faces (crowds contained repeated pictures of four identities on each trial) for males and females in Experiment 2a. Crowd face perception AEE was the average AEE for the 4, 8, and 12 face conditions. (B) Relationship between single face discrimination and redundant upright crowd face perception for all females and the subset of males who had an equivalent single face perception as females in Experiment 2a. (C) Relationship between single face discrimination and non-redundant upright crowd face perception for males and females in Experiment 2b.
Mentions: In this experiment, in contrast to the single face condition, the other three conditions required participants to ensemble code the crowd in order to provide a more precise average estimation. In order to test the relationship between single face detection and ensemble coding of crowds, we collapsed the 4, 8, and 12 upright face conditions together and performed the same linear regression described in Experiment 1 (Figure 3A) using each subject's AEE for the single upright face condition as Y and AEE for the multi upright face condition (collapsed across 4, 8, and 12 upright faces conditions) as X. The results again showed that males had a steeper slope compared to females (bmale = 0.811; bfemale = 0.495), and a permutation test showed that this difference was significant (p < 0.001). This indicates that, despite their relatively poor sensitivity to single faces, male subjects' sensitivity to crowd identity was relatively high.

Bottom Line: In this study, we investigated whether the first impression of a crowd of faces-crowd perception-is influenced by social background and cognitive processing.Furthermore, the results showed that females were generally more accurate in estimating the average identity of a crowd.Overall, the results suggest that group perception is not an isolated or uniform cognitive mechanism, but rather one that interacts with biological and social processes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of California, Berkeley Berkeley, CA, USA.

ABSTRACT
In this study, we investigated whether the first impression of a crowd of faces-crowd perception-is influenced by social background and cognitive processing. Specifically, we explored whether males and females, two groups that are distinct biologically and socially, differ in their ability to extract ensemble characteristics from crowds of faces that were comprised of different identities. Participants were presented with crowds of similar faces and were instructed to scroll through a morphed continuum of faces until they found a face that was representative of the average identity of each crowd. Consistent with previous research, females were more precise in single face perception. Furthermore, the results showed that females were generally more accurate in estimating the average identity of a crowd. However, the correlation between single face discrimination and crowd averaging differed between males and females. Specifically, male subjects' ensemble integration slightly compensated for their poor single face perception; their performance on the crowd perception task was not as poor as would be expected from their single face discrimination ability. Overall, the results suggest that group perception is not an isolated or uniform cognitive mechanism, but rather one that interacts with biological and social processes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus