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A Brief Review of Bioactive Metabolites Derived from Deep-Sea Fungi.

Wang YT, Xue YR, Liu CH - Mar Drugs (2015)

Bottom Line: To date more than 180 bioactive secondary metabolites derived from deep-sea fungi have been documented in the literature.These include compounds with anticancer, antimicrobial, antifungal, antiprotozoal, and antiviral activities.In this review, we summarize the structures and bioactivities of these metabolites to provide help for novel drug development.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Science, Nanjing University. wangyanting2012@qq.com.

ABSTRACT
Deep-sea fungi, the fungi that inhabit the sea and the sediment at depths of over 1000 m below the surface, have become an important source of industrial, agricultural, and nutraceutical compounds based on their diversities in both structure and function. Since the first study of deep-sea fungi in the Atlantic Ocean at a depth of 4450 m was conducted approximately 50 years ago, hundreds of isolates of deep-sea fungi have been reported based on culture-dependent methods. To date more than 180 bioactive secondary metabolites derived from deep-sea fungi have been documented in the literature. These include compounds with anticancer, antimicrobial, antifungal, antiprotozoal, and antiviral activities. In this review, we summarize the structures and bioactivities of these metabolites to provide help for novel drug development.

No MeSH data available.


Chemical structures of compounds 166–170.
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marinedrugs-13-04594-f027: Chemical structures of compounds 166–170.

Mentions: Recently, Zhang et al. (2014) [23] have evaluated the antimicrobial activities of the secondary metabolites produced by eight novel deep-sea-derived fungal species, Acremonium implicatum DFFSCS001 (AI001), Aspergillus westerdijkiae DFFSCS013 (AW013), Alternaria tenuissima DFFSCS003 (AT003), Cladosporium cladosporioides DFFSCS016 (CC016), Cladosporium sphaerospermum DFFSCS019 (CS019), Engyodontium album DFFSCS021 (EA021), Geomyces vinaceus DFFSCS022 (GV022), and Tritirachium sp. DFFSCS034 (TS034). These fungal species were isolated from sediments of the South China Sea [23], and almost all the ethyl acetate extracts of the fungal species show strong antibacterial activity against two larval-settlement-inducing bacteria Loktanella hongkongensis and Micrococcus luteus, and one marine pathogenic bacterium. Based on bioassay-guided isolation technique, they have isolated five compounds (166–170) (Figure 27) from the extract of Aspergillus westerdijkiae DFFSCS013 that show antifouling activity against Bugula neritina larval settlement with an EC50 of 6.4–34.9 μg/mL [25].


A Brief Review of Bioactive Metabolites Derived from Deep-Sea Fungi.

Wang YT, Xue YR, Liu CH - Mar Drugs (2015)

Chemical structures of compounds 166–170.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4556995&req=5

marinedrugs-13-04594-f027: Chemical structures of compounds 166–170.
Mentions: Recently, Zhang et al. (2014) [23] have evaluated the antimicrobial activities of the secondary metabolites produced by eight novel deep-sea-derived fungal species, Acremonium implicatum DFFSCS001 (AI001), Aspergillus westerdijkiae DFFSCS013 (AW013), Alternaria tenuissima DFFSCS003 (AT003), Cladosporium cladosporioides DFFSCS016 (CC016), Cladosporium sphaerospermum DFFSCS019 (CS019), Engyodontium album DFFSCS021 (EA021), Geomyces vinaceus DFFSCS022 (GV022), and Tritirachium sp. DFFSCS034 (TS034). These fungal species were isolated from sediments of the South China Sea [23], and almost all the ethyl acetate extracts of the fungal species show strong antibacterial activity against two larval-settlement-inducing bacteria Loktanella hongkongensis and Micrococcus luteus, and one marine pathogenic bacterium. Based on bioassay-guided isolation technique, they have isolated five compounds (166–170) (Figure 27) from the extract of Aspergillus westerdijkiae DFFSCS013 that show antifouling activity against Bugula neritina larval settlement with an EC50 of 6.4–34.9 μg/mL [25].

Bottom Line: To date more than 180 bioactive secondary metabolites derived from deep-sea fungi have been documented in the literature.These include compounds with anticancer, antimicrobial, antifungal, antiprotozoal, and antiviral activities.In this review, we summarize the structures and bioactivities of these metabolites to provide help for novel drug development.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Science, Nanjing University. wangyanting2012@qq.com.

ABSTRACT
Deep-sea fungi, the fungi that inhabit the sea and the sediment at depths of over 1000 m below the surface, have become an important source of industrial, agricultural, and nutraceutical compounds based on their diversities in both structure and function. Since the first study of deep-sea fungi in the Atlantic Ocean at a depth of 4450 m was conducted approximately 50 years ago, hundreds of isolates of deep-sea fungi have been reported based on culture-dependent methods. To date more than 180 bioactive secondary metabolites derived from deep-sea fungi have been documented in the literature. These include compounds with anticancer, antimicrobial, antifungal, antiprotozoal, and antiviral activities. In this review, we summarize the structures and bioactivities of these metabolites to provide help for novel drug development.

No MeSH data available.