Limits...
A Brief Review of Bioactive Metabolites Derived from Deep-Sea Fungi.

Wang YT, Xue YR, Liu CH - Mar Drugs (2015)

Bottom Line: To date more than 180 bioactive secondary metabolites derived from deep-sea fungi have been documented in the literature.These include compounds with anticancer, antimicrobial, antifungal, antiprotozoal, and antiviral activities.In this review, we summarize the structures and bioactivities of these metabolites to provide help for novel drug development.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Science, Nanjing University. wangyanting2012@qq.com.

ABSTRACT
Deep-sea fungi, the fungi that inhabit the sea and the sediment at depths of over 1000 m below the surface, have become an important source of industrial, agricultural, and nutraceutical compounds based on their diversities in both structure and function. Since the first study of deep-sea fungi in the Atlantic Ocean at a depth of 4450 m was conducted approximately 50 years ago, hundreds of isolates of deep-sea fungi have been reported based on culture-dependent methods. To date more than 180 bioactive secondary metabolites derived from deep-sea fungi have been documented in the literature. These include compounds with anticancer, antimicrobial, antifungal, antiprotozoal, and antiviral activities. In this review, we summarize the structures and bioactivities of these metabolites to provide help for novel drug development.

No MeSH data available.


Chemical structures of compounds 139–148.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4556995&req=5

marinedrugs-13-04594-f023: Chemical structures of compounds 139–148.

Mentions: Four new prenylxanthones, emerixanthones A–D (139–143), together with six known analogues (144–148) (Figure 23), were isolated from the culture of the deep-sea fungus Emericella sp. SCSIO 05240. All of them show weak growth inhibition against bacteria. The inhibition zone of compounds 139 and 141 against Escherichia coli (ATCC 29922), Klebsiella pneumonia (ATCC 13883), Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 29213), Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC 29212), Acinetobacter baumanii (ATCC 19606), and Aeromonas hydrophila (ATCC 7966) is 1–3 mm in diameter. Moreover, compound 143 displays broad antifungal activities (3–4 mm in diameter) against Fusarium sp., Penicillium sp., Aspergillus niger, Rhizoctonia solani, Fusarium oxysporium f. sp. niveum, and Fusarium oxysporium f. sp. cucumeris [8].


A Brief Review of Bioactive Metabolites Derived from Deep-Sea Fungi.

Wang YT, Xue YR, Liu CH - Mar Drugs (2015)

Chemical structures of compounds 139–148.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4556995&req=5

marinedrugs-13-04594-f023: Chemical structures of compounds 139–148.
Mentions: Four new prenylxanthones, emerixanthones A–D (139–143), together with six known analogues (144–148) (Figure 23), were isolated from the culture of the deep-sea fungus Emericella sp. SCSIO 05240. All of them show weak growth inhibition against bacteria. The inhibition zone of compounds 139 and 141 against Escherichia coli (ATCC 29922), Klebsiella pneumonia (ATCC 13883), Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 29213), Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC 29212), Acinetobacter baumanii (ATCC 19606), and Aeromonas hydrophila (ATCC 7966) is 1–3 mm in diameter. Moreover, compound 143 displays broad antifungal activities (3–4 mm in diameter) against Fusarium sp., Penicillium sp., Aspergillus niger, Rhizoctonia solani, Fusarium oxysporium f. sp. niveum, and Fusarium oxysporium f. sp. cucumeris [8].

Bottom Line: To date more than 180 bioactive secondary metabolites derived from deep-sea fungi have been documented in the literature.These include compounds with anticancer, antimicrobial, antifungal, antiprotozoal, and antiviral activities.In this review, we summarize the structures and bioactivities of these metabolites to provide help for novel drug development.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Science, Nanjing University. wangyanting2012@qq.com.

ABSTRACT
Deep-sea fungi, the fungi that inhabit the sea and the sediment at depths of over 1000 m below the surface, have become an important source of industrial, agricultural, and nutraceutical compounds based on their diversities in both structure and function. Since the first study of deep-sea fungi in the Atlantic Ocean at a depth of 4450 m was conducted approximately 50 years ago, hundreds of isolates of deep-sea fungi have been reported based on culture-dependent methods. To date more than 180 bioactive secondary metabolites derived from deep-sea fungi have been documented in the literature. These include compounds with anticancer, antimicrobial, antifungal, antiprotozoal, and antiviral activities. In this review, we summarize the structures and bioactivities of these metabolites to provide help for novel drug development.

No MeSH data available.