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A Brief Review of Bioactive Metabolites Derived from Deep-Sea Fungi.

Wang YT, Xue YR, Liu CH - Mar Drugs (2015)

Bottom Line: To date more than 180 bioactive secondary metabolites derived from deep-sea fungi have been documented in the literature.These include compounds with anticancer, antimicrobial, antifungal, antiprotozoal, and antiviral activities.In this review, we summarize the structures and bioactivities of these metabolites to provide help for novel drug development.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Science, Nanjing University. wangyanting2012@qq.com.

ABSTRACT
Deep-sea fungi, the fungi that inhabit the sea and the sediment at depths of over 1000 m below the surface, have become an important source of industrial, agricultural, and nutraceutical compounds based on their diversities in both structure and function. Since the first study of deep-sea fungi in the Atlantic Ocean at a depth of 4450 m was conducted approximately 50 years ago, hundreds of isolates of deep-sea fungi have been reported based on culture-dependent methods. To date more than 180 bioactive secondary metabolites derived from deep-sea fungi have been documented in the literature. These include compounds with anticancer, antimicrobial, antifungal, antiprotozoal, and antiviral activities. In this review, we summarize the structures and bioactivities of these metabolites to provide help for novel drug development.

No MeSH data available.


Chemical structures of compounds 17–30.
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marinedrugs-13-04594-f002: Chemical structures of compounds 17–30.

Mentions: Nine new C9 polyketides, named aspiketolactonol (17), aspilactonols A–F (18–23), aspyronol (25), and epiaspinonediol (27), together with five known polyketides, (S)-2-(2′-hydroxyethyl)-4-methyl-γ-butyrolactone (24), dihydroaspyrone (26), aspinotriol A (28), aspinotriol B (29), and chaetoquadrin F (30) (Figure 2), have been isolated from the secondary metabolites of Aspergillus sp. 16-02-1, which was isolated from a deep-sea sediment at a Lau Basin hydrothermal vent (depth 2255 m, temperature 114 °C) in the southwest of the Pacific Ocean. All of these compounds show strong cytotoxic activities against human cancer cell lines such as K562, HL-60, HeLa, and BGC-823 [42].


A Brief Review of Bioactive Metabolites Derived from Deep-Sea Fungi.

Wang YT, Xue YR, Liu CH - Mar Drugs (2015)

Chemical structures of compounds 17–30.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4556995&req=5

marinedrugs-13-04594-f002: Chemical structures of compounds 17–30.
Mentions: Nine new C9 polyketides, named aspiketolactonol (17), aspilactonols A–F (18–23), aspyronol (25), and epiaspinonediol (27), together with five known polyketides, (S)-2-(2′-hydroxyethyl)-4-methyl-γ-butyrolactone (24), dihydroaspyrone (26), aspinotriol A (28), aspinotriol B (29), and chaetoquadrin F (30) (Figure 2), have been isolated from the secondary metabolites of Aspergillus sp. 16-02-1, which was isolated from a deep-sea sediment at a Lau Basin hydrothermal vent (depth 2255 m, temperature 114 °C) in the southwest of the Pacific Ocean. All of these compounds show strong cytotoxic activities against human cancer cell lines such as K562, HL-60, HeLa, and BGC-823 [42].

Bottom Line: To date more than 180 bioactive secondary metabolites derived from deep-sea fungi have been documented in the literature.These include compounds with anticancer, antimicrobial, antifungal, antiprotozoal, and antiviral activities.In this review, we summarize the structures and bioactivities of these metabolites to provide help for novel drug development.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Science, Nanjing University. wangyanting2012@qq.com.

ABSTRACT
Deep-sea fungi, the fungi that inhabit the sea and the sediment at depths of over 1000 m below the surface, have become an important source of industrial, agricultural, and nutraceutical compounds based on their diversities in both structure and function. Since the first study of deep-sea fungi in the Atlantic Ocean at a depth of 4450 m was conducted approximately 50 years ago, hundreds of isolates of deep-sea fungi have been reported based on culture-dependent methods. To date more than 180 bioactive secondary metabolites derived from deep-sea fungi have been documented in the literature. These include compounds with anticancer, antimicrobial, antifungal, antiprotozoal, and antiviral activities. In this review, we summarize the structures and bioactivities of these metabolites to provide help for novel drug development.

No MeSH data available.