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Temporo-parietal and fronto-parietal lobe contributions to theory of mind and executive control: an fMRI study of verbal jokes.

Chan YC, Lavallee JP - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: For all joke types, the left dlPFC appeared to support common cognitive mechanisms, such as script-shifting, while the vACC was associated with affective appreciation.The temporo-parietal lobe (TPJ and MTG) was associated with BJs, suggesting involvement of these regions with 'theory of mind' processing.The social-affective appreciation of verbal jokes was associated with activity in the orbitofrontal cortex, amygdala, and parahippocampal gyrus.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Learning Sciences, National Tsing Hua University Hsinchu, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT
'Getting a joke' always requires resolving an apparent incongruity, but the particular cognitive operations called upon vary depending on the nature of the joke itself. Previous research has identified the primary neural correlates of the cognitive and affective processes called upon to respond to humor generally, but little work has been done on the substrates underlying the distinct cognitive operations required to comprehend particular joke types. This study explored the neural correlates of the cognitive processes required to successfully comprehend three joke types: bridging-inference jokes (BJs), exaggeration jokes (EJs), and ambiguity jokes (AJs). For all joke types, the left dlPFC appeared to support common cognitive mechanisms, such as script-shifting, while the vACC was associated with affective appreciation. The temporo-parietal lobe (TPJ and MTG) was associated with BJs, suggesting involvement of these regions with 'theory of mind' processing. The fronto-parietal lobe (IPL and IFG) was associated with both EJs and AJs, suggesting that it supports executive control processes such as retrieval from episodic memory, self-awareness, and language-based decoding. The social-affective appreciation of verbal jokes was associated with activity in the orbitofrontal cortex, amygdala, and parahippocampal gyrus. These results allow a more precise account of the neural processes required to support the particular cognitive operations required for the understanding of different types of humor.

No MeSH data available.


Distinct neural mechanisms for bridging-inference jokes in temporo-parietal lobe (TPJ and MTG). (Top) Brain images of greater activations were found for simple main contrast of bridging-inference jokes with corresponding non-joke baseline (BJ-BS) in TPJ and MTG during cognitive processing and in OFC during affective processing. MNI coordinates for distinct regions can be found in Table 6. (Bottom) Bars show mean beta values of peak voxels for each of the three types. Error bars represent standard error of the mean (SEM). L, left; R, right; TPJ, temporoparietal junction; MTG, middle temporal gyrus; OFC, orbitofrontal cortex; BJ, bridging-inference jokes; BS, bridging-inference baseline stimuli; EJ, exaggeration jokes; ES, exaggeration baseline stimuli; AJ, ambiguity jokes; AS, ambiguity baseline stimuli.
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Figure 2: Distinct neural mechanisms for bridging-inference jokes in temporo-parietal lobe (TPJ and MTG). (Top) Brain images of greater activations were found for simple main contrast of bridging-inference jokes with corresponding non-joke baseline (BJ-BS) in TPJ and MTG during cognitive processing and in OFC during affective processing. MNI coordinates for distinct regions can be found in Table 6. (Bottom) Bars show mean beta values of peak voxels for each of the three types. Error bars represent standard error of the mean (SEM). L, left; R, right; TPJ, temporoparietal junction; MTG, middle temporal gyrus; OFC, orbitofrontal cortex; BJ, bridging-inference jokes; BS, bridging-inference baseline stimuli; EJ, exaggeration jokes; ES, exaggeration baseline stimuli; AJ, ambiguity jokes; AS, ambiguity baseline stimuli.

Mentions: In the bridging-inference type condition, the BJs versus BS contrast revealed a network of cortical regions involved in the process of inferring consequences. Significant activations were found in the bilateral TPJ (BA 39), left vACC (BA 32), right MTG (BA 21), and left OFC (BA 11; Table 6 and Figure 2).


Temporo-parietal and fronto-parietal lobe contributions to theory of mind and executive control: an fMRI study of verbal jokes.

Chan YC, Lavallee JP - Front Psychol (2015)

Distinct neural mechanisms for bridging-inference jokes in temporo-parietal lobe (TPJ and MTG). (Top) Brain images of greater activations were found for simple main contrast of bridging-inference jokes with corresponding non-joke baseline (BJ-BS) in TPJ and MTG during cognitive processing and in OFC during affective processing. MNI coordinates for distinct regions can be found in Table 6. (Bottom) Bars show mean beta values of peak voxels for each of the three types. Error bars represent standard error of the mean (SEM). L, left; R, right; TPJ, temporoparietal junction; MTG, middle temporal gyrus; OFC, orbitofrontal cortex; BJ, bridging-inference jokes; BS, bridging-inference baseline stimuli; EJ, exaggeration jokes; ES, exaggeration baseline stimuli; AJ, ambiguity jokes; AS, ambiguity baseline stimuli.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4556987&req=5

Figure 2: Distinct neural mechanisms for bridging-inference jokes in temporo-parietal lobe (TPJ and MTG). (Top) Brain images of greater activations were found for simple main contrast of bridging-inference jokes with corresponding non-joke baseline (BJ-BS) in TPJ and MTG during cognitive processing and in OFC during affective processing. MNI coordinates for distinct regions can be found in Table 6. (Bottom) Bars show mean beta values of peak voxels for each of the three types. Error bars represent standard error of the mean (SEM). L, left; R, right; TPJ, temporoparietal junction; MTG, middle temporal gyrus; OFC, orbitofrontal cortex; BJ, bridging-inference jokes; BS, bridging-inference baseline stimuli; EJ, exaggeration jokes; ES, exaggeration baseline stimuli; AJ, ambiguity jokes; AS, ambiguity baseline stimuli.
Mentions: In the bridging-inference type condition, the BJs versus BS contrast revealed a network of cortical regions involved in the process of inferring consequences. Significant activations were found in the bilateral TPJ (BA 39), left vACC (BA 32), right MTG (BA 21), and left OFC (BA 11; Table 6 and Figure 2).

Bottom Line: For all joke types, the left dlPFC appeared to support common cognitive mechanisms, such as script-shifting, while the vACC was associated with affective appreciation.The temporo-parietal lobe (TPJ and MTG) was associated with BJs, suggesting involvement of these regions with 'theory of mind' processing.The social-affective appreciation of verbal jokes was associated with activity in the orbitofrontal cortex, amygdala, and parahippocampal gyrus.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Learning Sciences, National Tsing Hua University Hsinchu, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT
'Getting a joke' always requires resolving an apparent incongruity, but the particular cognitive operations called upon vary depending on the nature of the joke itself. Previous research has identified the primary neural correlates of the cognitive and affective processes called upon to respond to humor generally, but little work has been done on the substrates underlying the distinct cognitive operations required to comprehend particular joke types. This study explored the neural correlates of the cognitive processes required to successfully comprehend three joke types: bridging-inference jokes (BJs), exaggeration jokes (EJs), and ambiguity jokes (AJs). For all joke types, the left dlPFC appeared to support common cognitive mechanisms, such as script-shifting, while the vACC was associated with affective appreciation. The temporo-parietal lobe (TPJ and MTG) was associated with BJs, suggesting involvement of these regions with 'theory of mind' processing. The fronto-parietal lobe (IPL and IFG) was associated with both EJs and AJs, suggesting that it supports executive control processes such as retrieval from episodic memory, self-awareness, and language-based decoding. The social-affective appreciation of verbal jokes was associated with activity in the orbitofrontal cortex, amygdala, and parahippocampal gyrus. These results allow a more precise account of the neural processes required to support the particular cognitive operations required for the understanding of different types of humor.

No MeSH data available.