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Temporo-parietal and fronto-parietal lobe contributions to theory of mind and executive control: an fMRI study of verbal jokes.

Chan YC, Lavallee JP - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: For all joke types, the left dlPFC appeared to support common cognitive mechanisms, such as script-shifting, while the vACC was associated with affective appreciation.The temporo-parietal lobe (TPJ and MTG) was associated with BJs, suggesting involvement of these regions with 'theory of mind' processing.The social-affective appreciation of verbal jokes was associated with activity in the orbitofrontal cortex, amygdala, and parahippocampal gyrus.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Learning Sciences, National Tsing Hua University Hsinchu, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT
'Getting a joke' always requires resolving an apparent incongruity, but the particular cognitive operations called upon vary depending on the nature of the joke itself. Previous research has identified the primary neural correlates of the cognitive and affective processes called upon to respond to humor generally, but little work has been done on the substrates underlying the distinct cognitive operations required to comprehend particular joke types. This study explored the neural correlates of the cognitive processes required to successfully comprehend three joke types: bridging-inference jokes (BJs), exaggeration jokes (EJs), and ambiguity jokes (AJs). For all joke types, the left dlPFC appeared to support common cognitive mechanisms, such as script-shifting, while the vACC was associated with affective appreciation. The temporo-parietal lobe (TPJ and MTG) was associated with BJs, suggesting involvement of these regions with 'theory of mind' processing. The fronto-parietal lobe (IPL and IFG) was associated with both EJs and AJs, suggesting that it supports executive control processes such as retrieval from episodic memory, self-awareness, and language-based decoding. The social-affective appreciation of verbal jokes was associated with activity in the orbitofrontal cortex, amygdala, and parahippocampal gyrus. These results allow a more precise account of the neural processes required to support the particular cognitive operations required for the understanding of different types of humor.

No MeSH data available.


An experimental trial timeline during the scanner. Stimuli were presented in an event-related fMRI paradigm.
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Figure 1: An experimental trial timeline during the scanner. Stimuli were presented in an event-related fMRI paradigm.

Mentions: The experiment employed an event-related paradigm. The study investigated the distinct and shared neural correlates across three joke types (bridging-inference/exaggeration/ambiguity) and the funniness (joke/non-joke) contrast, resulting in six conditions. All stimuli were presented in black and white. While in the scanner, each participant was presented with 40 verbal jokes and 40 corresponding non-joke baseline stimuli. Within each trial, a jittered inter-stimulus interval (ISI) of 2.1, 3.2, 5.6, and 7.9 s was varied randomly and counterbalanced across events. The setup was shown once for 12 s, after which the punch line was delivered, lasting 9 s. Participants then provided a subjective funniness judgment by pressing one of four buttons on a keypad (1 = ‘not funny at all’ to 4 = ‘very funny’; Figure 1). The use of hand for the button-press responses was counterbalanced in the scanner. There were five functional runs in total. Trials in the six experimental conditions were pseudorandomized and counterbalanced across the five functional runs. A custom-built pseudorandom order list across conditions was generated using Matlab. Each functional run lasted 8 min and 4 s, with a 2-min break between runs. The total duration of the experiment was approximately 48 min and 6 s per participant.


Temporo-parietal and fronto-parietal lobe contributions to theory of mind and executive control: an fMRI study of verbal jokes.

Chan YC, Lavallee JP - Front Psychol (2015)

An experimental trial timeline during the scanner. Stimuli were presented in an event-related fMRI paradigm.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4556987&req=5

Figure 1: An experimental trial timeline during the scanner. Stimuli were presented in an event-related fMRI paradigm.
Mentions: The experiment employed an event-related paradigm. The study investigated the distinct and shared neural correlates across three joke types (bridging-inference/exaggeration/ambiguity) and the funniness (joke/non-joke) contrast, resulting in six conditions. All stimuli were presented in black and white. While in the scanner, each participant was presented with 40 verbal jokes and 40 corresponding non-joke baseline stimuli. Within each trial, a jittered inter-stimulus interval (ISI) of 2.1, 3.2, 5.6, and 7.9 s was varied randomly and counterbalanced across events. The setup was shown once for 12 s, after which the punch line was delivered, lasting 9 s. Participants then provided a subjective funniness judgment by pressing one of four buttons on a keypad (1 = ‘not funny at all’ to 4 = ‘very funny’; Figure 1). The use of hand for the button-press responses was counterbalanced in the scanner. There were five functional runs in total. Trials in the six experimental conditions were pseudorandomized and counterbalanced across the five functional runs. A custom-built pseudorandom order list across conditions was generated using Matlab. Each functional run lasted 8 min and 4 s, with a 2-min break between runs. The total duration of the experiment was approximately 48 min and 6 s per participant.

Bottom Line: For all joke types, the left dlPFC appeared to support common cognitive mechanisms, such as script-shifting, while the vACC was associated with affective appreciation.The temporo-parietal lobe (TPJ and MTG) was associated with BJs, suggesting involvement of these regions with 'theory of mind' processing.The social-affective appreciation of verbal jokes was associated with activity in the orbitofrontal cortex, amygdala, and parahippocampal gyrus.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Learning Sciences, National Tsing Hua University Hsinchu, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT
'Getting a joke' always requires resolving an apparent incongruity, but the particular cognitive operations called upon vary depending on the nature of the joke itself. Previous research has identified the primary neural correlates of the cognitive and affective processes called upon to respond to humor generally, but little work has been done on the substrates underlying the distinct cognitive operations required to comprehend particular joke types. This study explored the neural correlates of the cognitive processes required to successfully comprehend three joke types: bridging-inference jokes (BJs), exaggeration jokes (EJs), and ambiguity jokes (AJs). For all joke types, the left dlPFC appeared to support common cognitive mechanisms, such as script-shifting, while the vACC was associated with affective appreciation. The temporo-parietal lobe (TPJ and MTG) was associated with BJs, suggesting involvement of these regions with 'theory of mind' processing. The fronto-parietal lobe (IPL and IFG) was associated with both EJs and AJs, suggesting that it supports executive control processes such as retrieval from episodic memory, self-awareness, and language-based decoding. The social-affective appreciation of verbal jokes was associated with activity in the orbitofrontal cortex, amygdala, and parahippocampal gyrus. These results allow a more precise account of the neural processes required to support the particular cognitive operations required for the understanding of different types of humor.

No MeSH data available.