Limits...
Intercultural Competency in Public Health: A Call for Action to Incorporate Training into Public Health Education.

Fleckman JM, Dal Corso M, Ramirez S, Begalieva M, Johnson CC - Front Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: Due to increasing national diversity, programs addressing cultural competence have multiplied in U.S. medical training institutions.Although these programs share common goals for improving clinical care for patients and reducing health disparities, there is little standardization across programs.Awareness of differing cultures needs to be included in all processes of planning, implementation and evaluation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Maternal Child Health Leadership Training Program, Department of Global Community Health and Behavioral Sciences, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine , New Orleans, LA , USA.

ABSTRACT
Due to increasing national diversity, programs addressing cultural competence have multiplied in U.S. medical training institutions. Although these programs share common goals for improving clinical care for patients and reducing health disparities, there is little standardization across programs. Furthermore, little progress has been made to translate cultural competency training from the clinical setting into the public health setting where the focus is on population-based health, preventative programming, and epidemiological and behavioral research. The need for culturally relevant public health programming and culturally sensitive public health research is more critical than ever. Awareness of differing cultures needs to be included in all processes of planning, implementation and evaluation. By focusing on community-based health program planning and research, cultural competence implies that it is possible for public health professionals to completely know another culture, whereas intercultural competence implies it is a dual-sided process. Public health professionals need a commitment toward intercultural competence and skills that demonstrate flexibility, openness, and self-reflection so that cultural learning is possible. In this article, the authors recommend a number of elements to develop, adapt, and strengthen intercultural competence education in public health educational institutions.

No MeSH data available.


Overview of intercultural competence (ICC) framework for Public Health Institutions.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4556984&req=5

Figure 1: Overview of intercultural competence (ICC) framework for Public Health Institutions.

Mentions: Based on the ICC model, we developed a framework, as shown in Figure 1, to incorporate intercultural competency training into public health institutions.


Intercultural Competency in Public Health: A Call for Action to Incorporate Training into Public Health Education.

Fleckman JM, Dal Corso M, Ramirez S, Begalieva M, Johnson CC - Front Public Health (2015)

Overview of intercultural competence (ICC) framework for Public Health Institutions.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4556984&req=5

Figure 1: Overview of intercultural competence (ICC) framework for Public Health Institutions.
Mentions: Based on the ICC model, we developed a framework, as shown in Figure 1, to incorporate intercultural competency training into public health institutions.

Bottom Line: Due to increasing national diversity, programs addressing cultural competence have multiplied in U.S. medical training institutions.Although these programs share common goals for improving clinical care for patients and reducing health disparities, there is little standardization across programs.Awareness of differing cultures needs to be included in all processes of planning, implementation and evaluation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Maternal Child Health Leadership Training Program, Department of Global Community Health and Behavioral Sciences, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine , New Orleans, LA , USA.

ABSTRACT
Due to increasing national diversity, programs addressing cultural competence have multiplied in U.S. medical training institutions. Although these programs share common goals for improving clinical care for patients and reducing health disparities, there is little standardization across programs. Furthermore, little progress has been made to translate cultural competency training from the clinical setting into the public health setting where the focus is on population-based health, preventative programming, and epidemiological and behavioral research. The need for culturally relevant public health programming and culturally sensitive public health research is more critical than ever. Awareness of differing cultures needs to be included in all processes of planning, implementation and evaluation. By focusing on community-based health program planning and research, cultural competence implies that it is possible for public health professionals to completely know another culture, whereas intercultural competence implies it is a dual-sided process. Public health professionals need a commitment toward intercultural competence and skills that demonstrate flexibility, openness, and self-reflection so that cultural learning is possible. In this article, the authors recommend a number of elements to develop, adapt, and strengthen intercultural competence education in public health educational institutions.

No MeSH data available.