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Understanding Fibroblasts in Order to Comprehend the Osteopathic Treatment of the Fascia.

Bordoni B, Zanier E - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2015)

Bottom Line: This paper examines the current literature regarding the function and structure of the fascial system and its foundation, that is, the fibroblasts.They are a source of nociceptive and proprioceptive information as well, which is useful for proper functioning of the body system.Scientific research should make greater efforts to better understand their functioning and relationships.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Don Carlo Gnocchi IRCCS, Department of Cardiology, IRCCS S. Maria Nascente Don Carlo Gnocchi Foundation, Via Capecelatro 66, Milano, Italy ; School CRESO, Osteopathic Centre for Research and Studies, Falconara Marittima, Castellanza, Italy ; EdiAcademy, Viale Forlanini 65, Milano, Italy.

ABSTRACT
The osteopathic treatment of the fascia involves several techniques, each aimed at allowing the various layers of the connective system to slide over each other, improving the responses of the afferents in case of dysfunction. However, before becoming acquainted with a method, one must be aware of the structure and function of the tissue that needs treating, in order to not only better understand the manual approach, but also make a more conscious choice of the therapeutic technique to employ, in order to adjust the treatment to the specific needs of the patient. This paper examines the current literature regarding the function and structure of the fascial system and its foundation, that is, the fibroblasts. These connective cells have many properties, including the ability to contract and to communicate with one another. They play a key role in the transmission of the tension produced by the muscles and in the management of the interstitial fluids. They are a source of nociceptive and proprioceptive information as well, which is useful for proper functioning of the body system. Therefore, the fibroblasts are an invaluable instrument, essential to the understanding of the therapeutic effects of osteopathic treatment. Scientific research should make greater efforts to better understand their functioning and relationships.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The muscular fascial system. Transverse section at the level of the upper third of the leg. 1, tibia; 2, muscular compartment; 3, interosseous membrane; 4, fibula; 5, intermuscular septum. All tissues are enveloped by fascial continuum. Reproduced with permission Anastasi et al. AA VV, Anatomia dell'uomo, 4 ed, Edi.ermes, Milano [Human Anatomy].
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fig2: The muscular fascial system. Transverse section at the level of the upper third of the leg. 1, tibia; 2, muscular compartment; 3, interosseous membrane; 4, fibula; 5, intermuscular septum. All tissues are enveloped by fascial continuum. Reproduced with permission Anastasi et al. AA VV, Anatomia dell'uomo, 4 ed, Edi.ermes, Milano [Human Anatomy].

Mentions: The fascial continuum is essential for transmitting the muscle force, for a correct motor coordination, and for preserving the organs in their site: the fascia is a vital instrument that enables the individual to communicate and live independently. The transmission of the force is ensured by the fascial integrity, which is expressed by the motor activity produced; the tension produced by the sarcomeres results in muscle activity, using the various layers of the contractile districts (epimysium, perimysium, and endomysium), with different directions and speed [6, 11, 46, 47] (Figure 2).


Understanding Fibroblasts in Order to Comprehend the Osteopathic Treatment of the Fascia.

Bordoni B, Zanier E - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2015)

The muscular fascial system. Transverse section at the level of the upper third of the leg. 1, tibia; 2, muscular compartment; 3, interosseous membrane; 4, fibula; 5, intermuscular septum. All tissues are enveloped by fascial continuum. Reproduced with permission Anastasi et al. AA VV, Anatomia dell'uomo, 4 ed, Edi.ermes, Milano [Human Anatomy].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4556860&req=5

fig2: The muscular fascial system. Transverse section at the level of the upper third of the leg. 1, tibia; 2, muscular compartment; 3, interosseous membrane; 4, fibula; 5, intermuscular septum. All tissues are enveloped by fascial continuum. Reproduced with permission Anastasi et al. AA VV, Anatomia dell'uomo, 4 ed, Edi.ermes, Milano [Human Anatomy].
Mentions: The fascial continuum is essential for transmitting the muscle force, for a correct motor coordination, and for preserving the organs in their site: the fascia is a vital instrument that enables the individual to communicate and live independently. The transmission of the force is ensured by the fascial integrity, which is expressed by the motor activity produced; the tension produced by the sarcomeres results in muscle activity, using the various layers of the contractile districts (epimysium, perimysium, and endomysium), with different directions and speed [6, 11, 46, 47] (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: This paper examines the current literature regarding the function and structure of the fascial system and its foundation, that is, the fibroblasts.They are a source of nociceptive and proprioceptive information as well, which is useful for proper functioning of the body system.Scientific research should make greater efforts to better understand their functioning and relationships.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Don Carlo Gnocchi IRCCS, Department of Cardiology, IRCCS S. Maria Nascente Don Carlo Gnocchi Foundation, Via Capecelatro 66, Milano, Italy ; School CRESO, Osteopathic Centre for Research and Studies, Falconara Marittima, Castellanza, Italy ; EdiAcademy, Viale Forlanini 65, Milano, Italy.

ABSTRACT
The osteopathic treatment of the fascia involves several techniques, each aimed at allowing the various layers of the connective system to slide over each other, improving the responses of the afferents in case of dysfunction. However, before becoming acquainted with a method, one must be aware of the structure and function of the tissue that needs treating, in order to not only better understand the manual approach, but also make a more conscious choice of the therapeutic technique to employ, in order to adjust the treatment to the specific needs of the patient. This paper examines the current literature regarding the function and structure of the fascial system and its foundation, that is, the fibroblasts. These connective cells have many properties, including the ability to contract and to communicate with one another. They play a key role in the transmission of the tension produced by the muscles and in the management of the interstitial fluids. They are a source of nociceptive and proprioceptive information as well, which is useful for proper functioning of the body system. Therefore, the fibroblasts are an invaluable instrument, essential to the understanding of the therapeutic effects of osteopathic treatment. Scientific research should make greater efforts to better understand their functioning and relationships.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus