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Assessment of microbiological contamination in the work environments of museums, archives and libraries.

Skóra J, Gutarowska B, Pielech-Przybylska K, Stępień Ł, Pietrzak K, Piotrowska M, Pietrowski P - Aerobiologia (Bologna) (2015)

Bottom Line: We found a correlation between microclimatic conditions and numbers of micro-organisms in the air in the tested working environments.In addition, a correlation was also found between ergosterol concentration and the number of fungi in the air.Particles within the dominant fractions of culturable fungal aerosols sampled from museum storerooms had aerodynamic diameters between 1.1 and 2.1 µm.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Fermentation Technology and Microbiology, Lodz University of Technology, 171/173 Wólczańska St, 90-924 Lodz, Poland.

ABSTRACT

Museums, archives and libraries have large working environments. The goal of this study was to determine microbial contamination in these work places and estimate the influence of microclimatic parameters and total dust content on microbial contamination. In addition, research included evaluation of ergosterol concentration and fungal bioaerosol particle size distribution. Numbers of micro-organisms in the air and on the surfaces in museums were higher (2.1 × 10(2)-7.0 × 10(3) cfu/m(3) and 1.4 × 10(2)-1.7 × 10(4) cfu/100 cm(2), respectively) than in archives and libraries (3.2 × 10(2)-7.2 × 10(2) cfu/m(3) and 8.4 × 10(2)-8.8 × 10(2) cfu/100 cm(2), respectively). The numbers of micro-organisms detected in the tested museums, archives and libraries did not exceed occupational exposure limits proposed by Polish Committee for the Highest Permissible Concentrations and Intensities of Noxious Agents at the Workplace. The concentrations of respirable and suspended dust in museum storerooms were 2-4 times higher than the WHO-recommended limits. We found a correlation between microclimatic conditions and numbers of micro-organisms in the air in the tested working environments. In addition, a correlation was also found between ergosterol concentration and the number of fungi in the air. Fungi were the dominant micro-organisms in the working environments tested. Particles within the dominant fractions of culturable fungal aerosols sampled from museum storerooms had aerodynamic diameters between 1.1 and 2.1 µm.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean concentration (± 1 SD) of micro-organisms on the surface in museums, archives and libraries including internal (office) background. Number of samples (N = 12–24)
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Fig2: Mean concentration (± 1 SD) of micro-organisms on the surface in museums, archives and libraries including internal (office) background. Number of samples (N = 12–24)

Mentions: The number of micro-organisms in the air in museums averaged from 2.1 × 102 to 7.0 × 103 cfu/m3 and on the surfaces from 1.4 × 102 to 1.7 × 104 cfu/100 cm2 (Figs. 1, 2). Museum IV had the lowest level of air and surface microbiological contamination (high standards of hygiene, monitoring system for microclimatic parameters, museum of national rank). The highest concentration of bacteria was found in the air of Museum III, whose collections consist of folk culture objects (mainly made of wood and fabric). The highest statistically significant (p < 0.05) fungal contamination was found in Museum II, a war memorial museum (collections of paintings, firearms, weapons and flags). The fungal concentration in the rooms of that museum was 20 times greater than in the atmospheric air (p < 0.05).Fig. 1


Assessment of microbiological contamination in the work environments of museums, archives and libraries.

Skóra J, Gutarowska B, Pielech-Przybylska K, Stępień Ł, Pietrzak K, Piotrowska M, Pietrowski P - Aerobiologia (Bologna) (2015)

Mean concentration (± 1 SD) of micro-organisms on the surface in museums, archives and libraries including internal (office) background. Number of samples (N = 12–24)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4556743&req=5

Fig2: Mean concentration (± 1 SD) of micro-organisms on the surface in museums, archives and libraries including internal (office) background. Number of samples (N = 12–24)
Mentions: The number of micro-organisms in the air in museums averaged from 2.1 × 102 to 7.0 × 103 cfu/m3 and on the surfaces from 1.4 × 102 to 1.7 × 104 cfu/100 cm2 (Figs. 1, 2). Museum IV had the lowest level of air and surface microbiological contamination (high standards of hygiene, monitoring system for microclimatic parameters, museum of national rank). The highest concentration of bacteria was found in the air of Museum III, whose collections consist of folk culture objects (mainly made of wood and fabric). The highest statistically significant (p < 0.05) fungal contamination was found in Museum II, a war memorial museum (collections of paintings, firearms, weapons and flags). The fungal concentration in the rooms of that museum was 20 times greater than in the atmospheric air (p < 0.05).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: We found a correlation between microclimatic conditions and numbers of micro-organisms in the air in the tested working environments.In addition, a correlation was also found between ergosterol concentration and the number of fungi in the air.Particles within the dominant fractions of culturable fungal aerosols sampled from museum storerooms had aerodynamic diameters between 1.1 and 2.1 µm.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Fermentation Technology and Microbiology, Lodz University of Technology, 171/173 Wólczańska St, 90-924 Lodz, Poland.

ABSTRACT

Museums, archives and libraries have large working environments. The goal of this study was to determine microbial contamination in these work places and estimate the influence of microclimatic parameters and total dust content on microbial contamination. In addition, research included evaluation of ergosterol concentration and fungal bioaerosol particle size distribution. Numbers of micro-organisms in the air and on the surfaces in museums were higher (2.1 × 10(2)-7.0 × 10(3) cfu/m(3) and 1.4 × 10(2)-1.7 × 10(4) cfu/100 cm(2), respectively) than in archives and libraries (3.2 × 10(2)-7.2 × 10(2) cfu/m(3) and 8.4 × 10(2)-8.8 × 10(2) cfu/100 cm(2), respectively). The numbers of micro-organisms detected in the tested museums, archives and libraries did not exceed occupational exposure limits proposed by Polish Committee for the Highest Permissible Concentrations and Intensities of Noxious Agents at the Workplace. The concentrations of respirable and suspended dust in museum storerooms were 2-4 times higher than the WHO-recommended limits. We found a correlation between microclimatic conditions and numbers of micro-organisms in the air in the tested working environments. In addition, a correlation was also found between ergosterol concentration and the number of fungi in the air. Fungi were the dominant micro-organisms in the working environments tested. Particles within the dominant fractions of culturable fungal aerosols sampled from museum storerooms had aerodynamic diameters between 1.1 and 2.1 µm.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus