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Changes of Functional Brain Networks in Major Depressive Disorder: A Graph Theoretical Analysis of Resting-State fMRI.

Ye M, Yang T, Qing P, Lei X, Qiu J, Liu G - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Our results showed that compared with healthy controls, MDD patients showed higher local efficiency and modularity.Furthermore, MDD patients showed altered nodal centralities of many brain regions, including hippocampus, temporal cortex, anterior cingulate gyrus and dorsolateral prefrontal gyrus, mainly located in default mode network and cognitive control network.Together, our results suggested that MDD was associated with disruptions in the topological structure of functional brain networks, and provided new insights concerning the pathophysiological mechanisms of MDD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Computer and Information Science, Southwest University, Chongqing, China; College of Electronic and Information Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing, China.

ABSTRACT
Recent developments in graph theory have heightened the need for investigating the disruptions in the topological structure of functional brain network in major depressive disorder (MDD). In this study, we employed resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and graph theory to examine the whole-brain functional networks among 42 MDD patients and 42 healthy controls. Our results showed that compared with healthy controls, MDD patients showed higher local efficiency and modularity. Furthermore, MDD patients showed altered nodal centralities of many brain regions, including hippocampus, temporal cortex, anterior cingulate gyrus and dorsolateral prefrontal gyrus, mainly located in default mode network and cognitive control network. Together, our results suggested that MDD was associated with disruptions in the topological structure of functional brain networks, and provided new insights concerning the pathophysiological mechanisms of MDD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Modularity of functional brain networks.Functional brain networks of MDD patients (red) and healthy controls (black) showed larger modularity than random networks (green) at the whole range of 0.03~0.37. Additionally, increased modularity in MDD patients was observed over the range of 0.14~0.22 (p<0.05). Error bars corresponded to standard error of the mean. Purple stars indicated where the difference between MDD patients and healthy controls was significant (p<0.05).
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pone.0133775.g002: Modularity of functional brain networks.Functional brain networks of MDD patients (red) and healthy controls (black) showed larger modularity than random networks (green) at the whole range of 0.03~0.37. Additionally, increased modularity in MDD patients was observed over the range of 0.14~0.22 (p<0.05). Error bars corresponded to standard error of the mean. Purple stars indicated where the difference between MDD patients and healthy controls was significant (p<0.05).

Mentions: Functional brain networks of MDD patients and healthy controls exhibited typical features of modular structure. Specifically, functional brain networks for both groups were significantly more modular than random networks with the same degree distribution over the range of 0.03~0.37 (Fig 2). In addition, a two-sample two-tailed t-test revealed that MDD patients showed increased modularity compared with healthy controls over the range of 0.14~0.22 (Fig 2). The brain networks were decomposed into 5 basic modules in healthy controls, but 6 basic modules in MDD patients (Fig 3).


Changes of Functional Brain Networks in Major Depressive Disorder: A Graph Theoretical Analysis of Resting-State fMRI.

Ye M, Yang T, Qing P, Lei X, Qiu J, Liu G - PLoS ONE (2015)

Modularity of functional brain networks.Functional brain networks of MDD patients (red) and healthy controls (black) showed larger modularity than random networks (green) at the whole range of 0.03~0.37. Additionally, increased modularity in MDD patients was observed over the range of 0.14~0.22 (p<0.05). Error bars corresponded to standard error of the mean. Purple stars indicated where the difference between MDD patients and healthy controls was significant (p<0.05).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4556670&req=5

pone.0133775.g002: Modularity of functional brain networks.Functional brain networks of MDD patients (red) and healthy controls (black) showed larger modularity than random networks (green) at the whole range of 0.03~0.37. Additionally, increased modularity in MDD patients was observed over the range of 0.14~0.22 (p<0.05). Error bars corresponded to standard error of the mean. Purple stars indicated where the difference between MDD patients and healthy controls was significant (p<0.05).
Mentions: Functional brain networks of MDD patients and healthy controls exhibited typical features of modular structure. Specifically, functional brain networks for both groups were significantly more modular than random networks with the same degree distribution over the range of 0.03~0.37 (Fig 2). In addition, a two-sample two-tailed t-test revealed that MDD patients showed increased modularity compared with healthy controls over the range of 0.14~0.22 (Fig 2). The brain networks were decomposed into 5 basic modules in healthy controls, but 6 basic modules in MDD patients (Fig 3).

Bottom Line: Our results showed that compared with healthy controls, MDD patients showed higher local efficiency and modularity.Furthermore, MDD patients showed altered nodal centralities of many brain regions, including hippocampus, temporal cortex, anterior cingulate gyrus and dorsolateral prefrontal gyrus, mainly located in default mode network and cognitive control network.Together, our results suggested that MDD was associated with disruptions in the topological structure of functional brain networks, and provided new insights concerning the pathophysiological mechanisms of MDD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Computer and Information Science, Southwest University, Chongqing, China; College of Electronic and Information Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing, China.

ABSTRACT
Recent developments in graph theory have heightened the need for investigating the disruptions in the topological structure of functional brain network in major depressive disorder (MDD). In this study, we employed resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and graph theory to examine the whole-brain functional networks among 42 MDD patients and 42 healthy controls. Our results showed that compared with healthy controls, MDD patients showed higher local efficiency and modularity. Furthermore, MDD patients showed altered nodal centralities of many brain regions, including hippocampus, temporal cortex, anterior cingulate gyrus and dorsolateral prefrontal gyrus, mainly located in default mode network and cognitive control network. Together, our results suggested that MDD was associated with disruptions in the topological structure of functional brain networks, and provided new insights concerning the pathophysiological mechanisms of MDD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus