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Infant Growth after Preterm Birth and Mental Health in Young Adulthood.

Sammallahti S, Lahti M, Pyhälä R, Lahti J, Pesonen AK, Heinonen K, Hovi P, Eriksson JG, Strang-Karlsson S, Järvenpää AL, Andersson S, Kajantie E, Räikkönen K - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Faster growth after preterm birth benefits long-term cognitive functioning.Additionally, we examined the moderating effects of intrauterine growth restriction.Intrauterine growth restriction did not systematically moderate any associations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Behavioural Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland; Children's Hospital, Helsinki University Central Hospital and University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Faster growth after preterm birth benefits long-term cognitive functioning. Whether these benefits extend to mental health remains largely unknown. We examined if faster growth in infancy is associated with better self-reported mental health in young adults born preterm at very low birth weight (VLBW) (< 1500 g).

Study design: As young adults, participants of the Helsinki Study of Very Low Birth Weight Adults self-reported symptoms of depression and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (n = 157) and other psychiatric problems (n = 104). As main predictors of mental health outcomes in linear regression models, we used infant weight, length, and head circumference at birth, term, and 12 months of corrected age, and growth between these time points. Growth data were collected from records and measures at term and at 12 months of corrected age were interpolated. Additionally, we examined the moderating effects of intrauterine growth restriction.

Results: Size at birth, term, or 12 months of corrected age, or growth between these time points were not associated with mental health outcomes (p-values >0.05). Intrauterine growth restriction did not systematically moderate any associations.

Conclusions: Despite the high variability in early growth of VLBW infants, the previously described association between slow growth in infancy and poorer cognitive functioning in later life is not reflected in symptoms of depression, ADHD, and other psychiatric problems. This suggests that the development of cognitive and psychiatric problems may have dissimilar critical periods in VLBW infants.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Growth in infancy and mental health questionnaire sumscores in very low birth weight adults.Change in mental health questionnaire sumscores (in SD units) in young adulthood per one SD faster growth from birth to term, and from term to 12 months of corrected age, in individuals with very low birth weight (<1500g). We adjusted for gestational age at birth, sex, age at completing questionnaire, highest education of a parent, and time period between closest true measurement point and term (and 12 months CA, when analyzing growth after term). Outcomes were standardized within the study group. Terms and abbreviations: APQ—Adult Problem Questionnaire, reflecting symptoms of attention deficit / hyperactivity disorder; BDI—Beck Depression Inventory; CES-D—Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale; ASR—ASEBA Adult Self Report; SD—standard deviation; Effect size—standard deviation change in questionnaire score.
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pone.0137092.g001: Growth in infancy and mental health questionnaire sumscores in very low birth weight adults.Change in mental health questionnaire sumscores (in SD units) in young adulthood per one SD faster growth from birth to term, and from term to 12 months of corrected age, in individuals with very low birth weight (<1500g). We adjusted for gestational age at birth, sex, age at completing questionnaire, highest education of a parent, and time period between closest true measurement point and term (and 12 months CA, when analyzing growth after term). Outcomes were standardized within the study group. Terms and abbreviations: APQ—Adult Problem Questionnaire, reflecting symptoms of attention deficit / hyperactivity disorder; BDI—Beck Depression Inventory; CES-D—Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale; ASR—ASEBA Adult Self Report; SD—standard deviation; Effect size—standard deviation change in questionnaire score.

Mentions: Firstly, we tested if growth from birth to term and from term to 12 months CA were associated with adult mental health outcomes. Fig 1 presents the main findings: associations between growth and APQ, BDI, CES-D, and ASR Total Problems sumscores. Additional results concerning ASR Internalizing and Externalizing subscales are shown in S1 Table. These associations were not statistically significant (Fig 1, S1 Table). The results remained similar after adjusting for neonatal complications/illnesses or maternal smoking during pregnancy, or excluding participants with neurosensory impairments.


Infant Growth after Preterm Birth and Mental Health in Young Adulthood.

Sammallahti S, Lahti M, Pyhälä R, Lahti J, Pesonen AK, Heinonen K, Hovi P, Eriksson JG, Strang-Karlsson S, Järvenpää AL, Andersson S, Kajantie E, Räikkönen K - PLoS ONE (2015)

Growth in infancy and mental health questionnaire sumscores in very low birth weight adults.Change in mental health questionnaire sumscores (in SD units) in young adulthood per one SD faster growth from birth to term, and from term to 12 months of corrected age, in individuals with very low birth weight (<1500g). We adjusted for gestational age at birth, sex, age at completing questionnaire, highest education of a parent, and time period between closest true measurement point and term (and 12 months CA, when analyzing growth after term). Outcomes were standardized within the study group. Terms and abbreviations: APQ—Adult Problem Questionnaire, reflecting symptoms of attention deficit / hyperactivity disorder; BDI—Beck Depression Inventory; CES-D—Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale; ASR—ASEBA Adult Self Report; SD—standard deviation; Effect size—standard deviation change in questionnaire score.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4556664&req=5

pone.0137092.g001: Growth in infancy and mental health questionnaire sumscores in very low birth weight adults.Change in mental health questionnaire sumscores (in SD units) in young adulthood per one SD faster growth from birth to term, and from term to 12 months of corrected age, in individuals with very low birth weight (<1500g). We adjusted for gestational age at birth, sex, age at completing questionnaire, highest education of a parent, and time period between closest true measurement point and term (and 12 months CA, when analyzing growth after term). Outcomes were standardized within the study group. Terms and abbreviations: APQ—Adult Problem Questionnaire, reflecting symptoms of attention deficit / hyperactivity disorder; BDI—Beck Depression Inventory; CES-D—Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale; ASR—ASEBA Adult Self Report; SD—standard deviation; Effect size—standard deviation change in questionnaire score.
Mentions: Firstly, we tested if growth from birth to term and from term to 12 months CA were associated with adult mental health outcomes. Fig 1 presents the main findings: associations between growth and APQ, BDI, CES-D, and ASR Total Problems sumscores. Additional results concerning ASR Internalizing and Externalizing subscales are shown in S1 Table. These associations were not statistically significant (Fig 1, S1 Table). The results remained similar after adjusting for neonatal complications/illnesses or maternal smoking during pregnancy, or excluding participants with neurosensory impairments.

Bottom Line: Faster growth after preterm birth benefits long-term cognitive functioning.Additionally, we examined the moderating effects of intrauterine growth restriction.Intrauterine growth restriction did not systematically moderate any associations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Behavioural Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland; Children's Hospital, Helsinki University Central Hospital and University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Faster growth after preterm birth benefits long-term cognitive functioning. Whether these benefits extend to mental health remains largely unknown. We examined if faster growth in infancy is associated with better self-reported mental health in young adults born preterm at very low birth weight (VLBW) (< 1500 g).

Study design: As young adults, participants of the Helsinki Study of Very Low Birth Weight Adults self-reported symptoms of depression and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (n = 157) and other psychiatric problems (n = 104). As main predictors of mental health outcomes in linear regression models, we used infant weight, length, and head circumference at birth, term, and 12 months of corrected age, and growth between these time points. Growth data were collected from records and measures at term and at 12 months of corrected age were interpolated. Additionally, we examined the moderating effects of intrauterine growth restriction.

Results: Size at birth, term, or 12 months of corrected age, or growth between these time points were not associated with mental health outcomes (p-values >0.05). Intrauterine growth restriction did not systematically moderate any associations.

Conclusions: Despite the high variability in early growth of VLBW infants, the previously described association between slow growth in infancy and poorer cognitive functioning in later life is not reflected in symptoms of depression, ADHD, and other psychiatric problems. This suggests that the development of cognitive and psychiatric problems may have dissimilar critical periods in VLBW infants.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus