Limits...
Life History Consequences of the Facultative Expression of a Dispersal Life Stage in the Phoretic Bulb Mite (Rhizoglyphus robini).

Deere JA, Coulson T, Smallegange IM - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: In this study, we identify effects of investing in dispersal morphology (dispersal expression) on life history traits in the male dimorphic bulb mite (Rhizoglyphus robini).Here, in an experiment, we investigate the effects of investing in dispersal on size at maturity, sex and male morph ratio, and female lifetime reproductive success.This suggests that alternative, male reproductive strategies and dispersal should not be viewed in isolation but considered concurrently.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom; Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics (IBED), University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Life history traits play an important role in population dynamics and correlate, both positively and negatively, with dispersal in a wide range of taxa. Most invertebrate studies on trade-offs between life history traits and dispersal have focused on dispersal via flight, yet much less is known about how life history trade-offs influence species that disperse by other means. In this study, we identify effects of investing in dispersal morphology (dispersal expression) on life history traits in the male dimorphic bulb mite (Rhizoglyphus robini). This species has a facultative juvenile life stage (deutonymph) during which individuals can disperse by phoresy. Further, adult males are either fighters (which kill other mites) or benign scramblers. Here, in an experiment, we investigate the effects of investing in dispersal on size at maturity, sex and male morph ratio, and female lifetime reproductive success. We show that life history traits correlate negatively with the expression of the dispersal stage. Remarkably, all males that expressed the dispersal life stage developed into competitive fighters and none into scramblers. This suggests that alternative, male reproductive strategies and dispersal should not be viewed in isolation but considered concurrently.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Compensatory growth.Total growth (mm) and standardised growth (mm per day per tritonymph length) during the tritonymph stage, as a function of deutonymph presence (Deuto) or deutonymph absence (No Deuto) during development in females (A) and fighter males (B). Boxes represent upper and lower quartile ranges, middle bands are medians and whiskers represent the extremes. Outliers are shown as points.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4556651&req=5

pone.0136872.g003: Compensatory growth.Total growth (mm) and standardised growth (mm per day per tritonymph length) during the tritonymph stage, as a function of deutonymph presence (Deuto) or deutonymph absence (No Deuto) during development in females (A) and fighter males (B). Boxes represent upper and lower quartile ranges, middle bands are medians and whiskers represent the extremes. Outliers are shown as points.

Mentions: Total growth and standardised growth were not significantly different between disperser tritonymphs (that developed from deutonymphs) and non-disperser tritonymphs (that developed from protonymphs) in females (total growth: ê = 0.020 ± 0.024 (s.e.), t = 0.869, P = 0.391; standardised growth: ê = 0.035 ± 0.032 (s.e.), t = 1.094, P = 0.281; n = 45) (Fig 3A) or males (total growth: ê = 0.018±0.026 (s.e.), t = 0.682, P = 0.501; standardised growth: ê = 0.006±0.035 (s.e.), t = 0.158, P = 0.876; n = 36) (Fig 3B). Total growth and standardised growth were also not significantly different between treatments in females (total growth: ê = -0.005±0.006 (s.e.), t = -0.807, P = 0.425; standardised growth: ê = 0.005±0.008 (s.e.), t = 0.625, P = 0.538; n = 45) or males (total growth: ê = 0.003±0.008 (s.e.), t = 0.348, P = 0.731; standardised growth: ê = 0.006±0.010 (s.e.), t = 0.614, P = 0.544; n = 36).


Life History Consequences of the Facultative Expression of a Dispersal Life Stage in the Phoretic Bulb Mite (Rhizoglyphus robini).

Deere JA, Coulson T, Smallegange IM - PLoS ONE (2015)

Compensatory growth.Total growth (mm) and standardised growth (mm per day per tritonymph length) during the tritonymph stage, as a function of deutonymph presence (Deuto) or deutonymph absence (No Deuto) during development in females (A) and fighter males (B). Boxes represent upper and lower quartile ranges, middle bands are medians and whiskers represent the extremes. Outliers are shown as points.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4556651&req=5

pone.0136872.g003: Compensatory growth.Total growth (mm) and standardised growth (mm per day per tritonymph length) during the tritonymph stage, as a function of deutonymph presence (Deuto) or deutonymph absence (No Deuto) during development in females (A) and fighter males (B). Boxes represent upper and lower quartile ranges, middle bands are medians and whiskers represent the extremes. Outliers are shown as points.
Mentions: Total growth and standardised growth were not significantly different between disperser tritonymphs (that developed from deutonymphs) and non-disperser tritonymphs (that developed from protonymphs) in females (total growth: ê = 0.020 ± 0.024 (s.e.), t = 0.869, P = 0.391; standardised growth: ê = 0.035 ± 0.032 (s.e.), t = 1.094, P = 0.281; n = 45) (Fig 3A) or males (total growth: ê = 0.018±0.026 (s.e.), t = 0.682, P = 0.501; standardised growth: ê = 0.006±0.035 (s.e.), t = 0.158, P = 0.876; n = 36) (Fig 3B). Total growth and standardised growth were also not significantly different between treatments in females (total growth: ê = -0.005±0.006 (s.e.), t = -0.807, P = 0.425; standardised growth: ê = 0.005±0.008 (s.e.), t = 0.625, P = 0.538; n = 45) or males (total growth: ê = 0.003±0.008 (s.e.), t = 0.348, P = 0.731; standardised growth: ê = 0.006±0.010 (s.e.), t = 0.614, P = 0.544; n = 36).

Bottom Line: In this study, we identify effects of investing in dispersal morphology (dispersal expression) on life history traits in the male dimorphic bulb mite (Rhizoglyphus robini).Here, in an experiment, we investigate the effects of investing in dispersal on size at maturity, sex and male morph ratio, and female lifetime reproductive success.This suggests that alternative, male reproductive strategies and dispersal should not be viewed in isolation but considered concurrently.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom; Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics (IBED), University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Life history traits play an important role in population dynamics and correlate, both positively and negatively, with dispersal in a wide range of taxa. Most invertebrate studies on trade-offs between life history traits and dispersal have focused on dispersal via flight, yet much less is known about how life history trade-offs influence species that disperse by other means. In this study, we identify effects of investing in dispersal morphology (dispersal expression) on life history traits in the male dimorphic bulb mite (Rhizoglyphus robini). This species has a facultative juvenile life stage (deutonymph) during which individuals can disperse by phoresy. Further, adult males are either fighters (which kill other mites) or benign scramblers. Here, in an experiment, we investigate the effects of investing in dispersal on size at maturity, sex and male morph ratio, and female lifetime reproductive success. We show that life history traits correlate negatively with the expression of the dispersal stage. Remarkably, all males that expressed the dispersal life stage developed into competitive fighters and none into scramblers. This suggests that alternative, male reproductive strategies and dispersal should not be viewed in isolation but considered concurrently.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus