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Exploitation of the Medfly Gut Microbiota for the Enhancement of Sterile Insect Technique: Use of Enterobacter sp. in Larval Diet-Based Probiotic Applications.

Augustinos AA, Kyritsis GA, Papadopoulos NT, Abd-Alla AM, Cáceres C, Bourtzis K - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: The Mediterranean fruit fly (medfly), Ceratitis capitata, is a pest of worldwide substantial economic importance, as well as a Tephritidae model for sterile insect technique (SIT) applications.Recent studies have suggested that the manipulation of gut symbionts can have a significant positive effect on the overall fitness of insect strains.Probiotic application of Enterobacter sp. resulted in improvement of both pupal and adult productivity, as well as reduced rearing duration, particularly for males, without affecting pupal weight, sex ratio, male mating competitiveness, flight ability and longevity under starvation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Insect Pest Control Laboratory, Joint FAO/IAEA Programme of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture, Seibersdorf, Vienna, Austria; Department of Environmental and Natural Resources Management, University of Patras, Agrinio, Greece.

ABSTRACT
The Mediterranean fruit fly (medfly), Ceratitis capitata, is a pest of worldwide substantial economic importance, as well as a Tephritidae model for sterile insect technique (SIT) applications. The latter is partially due to the development and utilization of genetic sexing strains (GSS) for this species, such as the Vienna 8 strain, which is currently used in mass rearing facilities worldwide. Improving the performance of such a strain both in mass rearing facilities and in the field could significantly enhance the efficacy of SIT and reduce operational costs. Recent studies have suggested that the manipulation of gut symbionts can have a significant positive effect on the overall fitness of insect strains. We used culture-based approaches to isolate and characterize gut-associated bacterial species of the Vienna 8 strain under mass rearing conditions. We also exploited one of the isolated bacterial species, Enterobacter sp., as dietary supplement (probiotic) to the larval diet, and we assessed its effects on fitness parameters under the standard operating procedures used in SIT operational programs. Probiotic application of Enterobacter sp. resulted in improvement of both pupal and adult productivity, as well as reduced rearing duration, particularly for males, without affecting pupal weight, sex ratio, male mating competitiveness, flight ability and longevity under starvation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Developmental times of immature stages at 22°C.(A) egg to pupa duration, (B) pupal stage duration, (C) total duration of immature stages. The top and bottom of the box are the 25th and 75th percentiles (Q(0.25) and Q(0.75), respectively). The size of the box (Interquartile Range-IQR) is defined as IQR = Q(0.75)-Q(0.25). The bold line in the box represents the median.
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pone.0136459.g003: Developmental times of immature stages at 22°C.(A) egg to pupa duration, (B) pupal stage duration, (C) total duration of immature stages. The top and bottom of the box are the 25th and 75th percentiles (Q(0.25) and Q(0.75), respectively). The size of the box (Interquartile Range-IQR) is defined as IQR = Q(0.75)-Q(0.25). The bold line in the box represents the median.

Mentions: The effect of the larval diet enriched with bacteria on the duration of the pre-pupal period is depicted in Fig 3A and S4A FigEnterobacter sp. as probiotics significantly reduced the pre-pupae developmental duration for both males (log rank test, x2 = 13.73, P<0.0001) and females (x2 = 10.56, P = 0.001), compared to the control treatment. This effect was more pronounced for “live bacteria”, which resulted in earlier pupation, compared not only to the “without bacteria” treatment (x2 = 102.31, 38.05; P<0.0001 for males and females, respectively), but also to the “autoclaved bacteria” treatment (x2 = 101.48, 26.99; P<0.0001, for males and females respectively).


Exploitation of the Medfly Gut Microbiota for the Enhancement of Sterile Insect Technique: Use of Enterobacter sp. in Larval Diet-Based Probiotic Applications.

Augustinos AA, Kyritsis GA, Papadopoulos NT, Abd-Alla AM, Cáceres C, Bourtzis K - PLoS ONE (2015)

Developmental times of immature stages at 22°C.(A) egg to pupa duration, (B) pupal stage duration, (C) total duration of immature stages. The top and bottom of the box are the 25th and 75th percentiles (Q(0.25) and Q(0.75), respectively). The size of the box (Interquartile Range-IQR) is defined as IQR = Q(0.75)-Q(0.25). The bold line in the box represents the median.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4556606&req=5

pone.0136459.g003: Developmental times of immature stages at 22°C.(A) egg to pupa duration, (B) pupal stage duration, (C) total duration of immature stages. The top and bottom of the box are the 25th and 75th percentiles (Q(0.25) and Q(0.75), respectively). The size of the box (Interquartile Range-IQR) is defined as IQR = Q(0.75)-Q(0.25). The bold line in the box represents the median.
Mentions: The effect of the larval diet enriched with bacteria on the duration of the pre-pupal period is depicted in Fig 3A and S4A FigEnterobacter sp. as probiotics significantly reduced the pre-pupae developmental duration for both males (log rank test, x2 = 13.73, P<0.0001) and females (x2 = 10.56, P = 0.001), compared to the control treatment. This effect was more pronounced for “live bacteria”, which resulted in earlier pupation, compared not only to the “without bacteria” treatment (x2 = 102.31, 38.05; P<0.0001 for males and females, respectively), but also to the “autoclaved bacteria” treatment (x2 = 101.48, 26.99; P<0.0001, for males and females respectively).

Bottom Line: The Mediterranean fruit fly (medfly), Ceratitis capitata, is a pest of worldwide substantial economic importance, as well as a Tephritidae model for sterile insect technique (SIT) applications.Recent studies have suggested that the manipulation of gut symbionts can have a significant positive effect on the overall fitness of insect strains.Probiotic application of Enterobacter sp. resulted in improvement of both pupal and adult productivity, as well as reduced rearing duration, particularly for males, without affecting pupal weight, sex ratio, male mating competitiveness, flight ability and longevity under starvation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Insect Pest Control Laboratory, Joint FAO/IAEA Programme of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture, Seibersdorf, Vienna, Austria; Department of Environmental and Natural Resources Management, University of Patras, Agrinio, Greece.

ABSTRACT
The Mediterranean fruit fly (medfly), Ceratitis capitata, is a pest of worldwide substantial economic importance, as well as a Tephritidae model for sterile insect technique (SIT) applications. The latter is partially due to the development and utilization of genetic sexing strains (GSS) for this species, such as the Vienna 8 strain, which is currently used in mass rearing facilities worldwide. Improving the performance of such a strain both in mass rearing facilities and in the field could significantly enhance the efficacy of SIT and reduce operational costs. Recent studies have suggested that the manipulation of gut symbionts can have a significant positive effect on the overall fitness of insect strains. We used culture-based approaches to isolate and characterize gut-associated bacterial species of the Vienna 8 strain under mass rearing conditions. We also exploited one of the isolated bacterial species, Enterobacter sp., as dietary supplement (probiotic) to the larval diet, and we assessed its effects on fitness parameters under the standard operating procedures used in SIT operational programs. Probiotic application of Enterobacter sp. resulted in improvement of both pupal and adult productivity, as well as reduced rearing duration, particularly for males, without affecting pupal weight, sex ratio, male mating competitiveness, flight ability and longevity under starvation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus