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Downscaling Pest Risk Analyses: Identifying Current and Future Potentially Suitable Habitats for Parthenium hysterophorus with Particular Reference to Europe and North Africa.

Kriticos DJ, Brunel S, Ota N, Fried G, Oude Lansink AG, Panetta FD, Prasad TV, Shabbir A, Yaacoby T - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: We also consider the effects of climate change on the modelled risks.Downscaling the climate model using habitat factors resulted in substantial (approximately 22-53%) reductions in the areas estimated to be endangered.Applying expert assessments as to suitable habitat classes resulted in the greatest reduction in the estimated endangered area, whereas inferring suitable habitats factors from distribution data identified more land use classes and a larger endangered area.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: CSIRO, GPO Box 1700, Canberra, ACT, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Pest Risk Assessments (PRAs) routinely employ climatic niche models to identify endangered areas. Typically, these models consider only climatic factors, ignoring the 'Swiss Cheese' nature of species ranges due to the interplay of climatic and habitat factors. As part of a PRA conducted for the European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization, we developed a climatic niche model for Parthenium hysterophorus, explicitly including the effects of irrigation where it was known to be practiced. We then downscaled the climatic risk model using two different methods to identify the suitable habitat types: expert opinion (following the EPPO PRA guidelines) and inferred from the global spatial distribution. The PRA revealed a substantial risk to the EPPO region and Central and Western Africa, highlighting the desirability of avoiding an invasion by P. hysterophorus. We also consider the effects of climate change on the modelled risks. The climate change scenario indicated the risk of substantial further spread of P. hysterophorus in temperate northern hemisphere regions (North America, Europe and the northern Middle East), and also high elevation equatorial regions (Western Brazil, Central Africa, and South East Asia) if minimum temperatures increase substantially. Downscaling the climate model using habitat factors resulted in substantial (approximately 22-53%) reductions in the areas estimated to be endangered. Applying expert assessments as to suitable habitat classes resulted in the greatest reduction in the estimated endangered area, whereas inferring suitable habitats factors from distribution data identified more land use classes and a larger endangered area. Despite some scaling issues with using a globally conformal Land Use Systems dataset, the inferential downscaling method shows promise as a routine addition to the PRA toolkit, as either a direct model component, or simply as a means of better informing an expert assessment of the suitable habitat types.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Modelling scheme for assessing pest risks for Parthenium hysterophorus in the EPPO region using the EPPO Decision-support scheme for quarantine pests.Green boxes are inputs, blue boxes are models, grey is an intermediate product, and orange boxes are outputs.
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pone.0132807.g001: Modelling scheme for assessing pest risks for Parthenium hysterophorus in the EPPO region using the EPPO Decision-support scheme for quarantine pests.Green boxes are inputs, blue boxes are models, grey is an intermediate product, and orange boxes are outputs.

Mentions: The modelling scheme is presented in Fig 1. The distribution data and ecophysiological knowledge for P. hysterophorus were used to develop a CLIMEX model under natural rainfall conditions. Because some distribution records for P. hysterophorus appear to represent populations that are able to persist only due to the presence of supplementary soil moisture, the CLIMEX model is used to run a natural rainfall and an irrigation scenario. These model outputs are combined on a cell-by-cell basis using a map of the distribution of irrigation areas [41] to create composite climate risk models for transient and established populations. The suitable habitat types are used to refine the climate suitability map for establishment to create the endangered area map for the risk assessment. A climate change scenario based on a Global Climate Model is then used to create a future composite climate risk scenario as a means of better understanding the sensitivity of any policy responses to the risks posed by P. hysterophorus.


Downscaling Pest Risk Analyses: Identifying Current and Future Potentially Suitable Habitats for Parthenium hysterophorus with Particular Reference to Europe and North Africa.

Kriticos DJ, Brunel S, Ota N, Fried G, Oude Lansink AG, Panetta FD, Prasad TV, Shabbir A, Yaacoby T - PLoS ONE (2015)

Modelling scheme for assessing pest risks for Parthenium hysterophorus in the EPPO region using the EPPO Decision-support scheme for quarantine pests.Green boxes are inputs, blue boxes are models, grey is an intermediate product, and orange boxes are outputs.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4556490&req=5

pone.0132807.g001: Modelling scheme for assessing pest risks for Parthenium hysterophorus in the EPPO region using the EPPO Decision-support scheme for quarantine pests.Green boxes are inputs, blue boxes are models, grey is an intermediate product, and orange boxes are outputs.
Mentions: The modelling scheme is presented in Fig 1. The distribution data and ecophysiological knowledge for P. hysterophorus were used to develop a CLIMEX model under natural rainfall conditions. Because some distribution records for P. hysterophorus appear to represent populations that are able to persist only due to the presence of supplementary soil moisture, the CLIMEX model is used to run a natural rainfall and an irrigation scenario. These model outputs are combined on a cell-by-cell basis using a map of the distribution of irrigation areas [41] to create composite climate risk models for transient and established populations. The suitable habitat types are used to refine the climate suitability map for establishment to create the endangered area map for the risk assessment. A climate change scenario based on a Global Climate Model is then used to create a future composite climate risk scenario as a means of better understanding the sensitivity of any policy responses to the risks posed by P. hysterophorus.

Bottom Line: We also consider the effects of climate change on the modelled risks.Downscaling the climate model using habitat factors resulted in substantial (approximately 22-53%) reductions in the areas estimated to be endangered.Applying expert assessments as to suitable habitat classes resulted in the greatest reduction in the estimated endangered area, whereas inferring suitable habitats factors from distribution data identified more land use classes and a larger endangered area.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: CSIRO, GPO Box 1700, Canberra, ACT, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Pest Risk Assessments (PRAs) routinely employ climatic niche models to identify endangered areas. Typically, these models consider only climatic factors, ignoring the 'Swiss Cheese' nature of species ranges due to the interplay of climatic and habitat factors. As part of a PRA conducted for the European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization, we developed a climatic niche model for Parthenium hysterophorus, explicitly including the effects of irrigation where it was known to be practiced. We then downscaled the climatic risk model using two different methods to identify the suitable habitat types: expert opinion (following the EPPO PRA guidelines) and inferred from the global spatial distribution. The PRA revealed a substantial risk to the EPPO region and Central and Western Africa, highlighting the desirability of avoiding an invasion by P. hysterophorus. We also consider the effects of climate change on the modelled risks. The climate change scenario indicated the risk of substantial further spread of P. hysterophorus in temperate northern hemisphere regions (North America, Europe and the northern Middle East), and also high elevation equatorial regions (Western Brazil, Central Africa, and South East Asia) if minimum temperatures increase substantially. Downscaling the climate model using habitat factors resulted in substantial (approximately 22-53%) reductions in the areas estimated to be endangered. Applying expert assessments as to suitable habitat classes resulted in the greatest reduction in the estimated endangered area, whereas inferring suitable habitats factors from distribution data identified more land use classes and a larger endangered area. Despite some scaling issues with using a globally conformal Land Use Systems dataset, the inferential downscaling method shows promise as a routine addition to the PRA toolkit, as either a direct model component, or simply as a means of better informing an expert assessment of the suitable habitat types.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus