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Modelling the Geographical Origin of Rice Cultivation in Asia Using the Rice Archaeological Database.

Silva F, Stevens CJ, Weisskopf A, Castillo C, Qin L, Bevan A, Fuller DQ - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: We have compiled an extensive database of archaeological evidence for rice across Asia, including 400 sites from mainland East Asia, Southeast Asia and South Asia.This dataset is used to compare several models for the geographical origins of rice cultivation and infer the most likely region(s) for its origins and subsequent outward diffusion.The model that best fits all available archaeological evidence is a dual origin model with two centres for the cultivation and dispersal of rice focused on the Middle Yangtze and the Lower Yangtze valleys.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University College London, Institute of Archaeology, London, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
We have compiled an extensive database of archaeological evidence for rice across Asia, including 400 sites from mainland East Asia, Southeast Asia and South Asia. This dataset is used to compare several models for the geographical origins of rice cultivation and infer the most likely region(s) for its origins and subsequent outward diffusion. The approach is based on regression modelling wherein goodness of fit is obtained from power law quantile regressions of the archaeologically inferred age versus a least-cost distance from the putative origin(s). The Fast Marching method is used to estimate the least-cost distances based on simple geographical features. The origin region that best fits the archaeobotanical data is also compared to other hypothetical geographical origins derived from the literature, including from genetics, archaeology and historical linguistics. The model that best fits all available archaeological evidence is a dual origin model with two centres for the cultivation and dispersal of rice focused on the Middle Yangtze and the Lower Yangtze valleys.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Scatterplots of age with cost distance for all models considered.The black dots represent records in the Rice Archaeological Database whereas the blue line represents the best-fitting log-log quantile regressed line for each model.
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pone.0137024.g007: Scatterplots of age with cost distance for all models considered.The black dots represent records in the Rice Archaeological Database whereas the blue line represents the best-fitting log-log quantile regressed line for each model.

Mentions: Table 2 shows the AIC values obtained for all hypotheses considered, ordered by how well they perform. Also included are all quantities used to calculate the AIC values, as well as the Δ values and model likelihood, which provide a measure of support. Scatterplots for each of the models are provided (Fig 7). The black dots correspond to data on the Rice Archaeological Database, whereas the red curve corresponds to the maximum likelihood estimated curve for each hypothesis, given the data.


Modelling the Geographical Origin of Rice Cultivation in Asia Using the Rice Archaeological Database.

Silva F, Stevens CJ, Weisskopf A, Castillo C, Qin L, Bevan A, Fuller DQ - PLoS ONE (2015)

Scatterplots of age with cost distance for all models considered.The black dots represent records in the Rice Archaeological Database whereas the blue line represents the best-fitting log-log quantile regressed line for each model.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4556484&req=5

pone.0137024.g007: Scatterplots of age with cost distance for all models considered.The black dots represent records in the Rice Archaeological Database whereas the blue line represents the best-fitting log-log quantile regressed line for each model.
Mentions: Table 2 shows the AIC values obtained for all hypotheses considered, ordered by how well they perform. Also included are all quantities used to calculate the AIC values, as well as the Δ values and model likelihood, which provide a measure of support. Scatterplots for each of the models are provided (Fig 7). The black dots correspond to data on the Rice Archaeological Database, whereas the red curve corresponds to the maximum likelihood estimated curve for each hypothesis, given the data.

Bottom Line: We have compiled an extensive database of archaeological evidence for rice across Asia, including 400 sites from mainland East Asia, Southeast Asia and South Asia.This dataset is used to compare several models for the geographical origins of rice cultivation and infer the most likely region(s) for its origins and subsequent outward diffusion.The model that best fits all available archaeological evidence is a dual origin model with two centres for the cultivation and dispersal of rice focused on the Middle Yangtze and the Lower Yangtze valleys.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University College London, Institute of Archaeology, London, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
We have compiled an extensive database of archaeological evidence for rice across Asia, including 400 sites from mainland East Asia, Southeast Asia and South Asia. This dataset is used to compare several models for the geographical origins of rice cultivation and infer the most likely region(s) for its origins and subsequent outward diffusion. The approach is based on regression modelling wherein goodness of fit is obtained from power law quantile regressions of the archaeologically inferred age versus a least-cost distance from the putative origin(s). The Fast Marching method is used to estimate the least-cost distances based on simple geographical features. The origin region that best fits the archaeobotanical data is also compared to other hypothetical geographical origins derived from the literature, including from genetics, archaeology and historical linguistics. The model that best fits all available archaeological evidence is a dual origin model with two centres for the cultivation and dispersal of rice focused on the Middle Yangtze and the Lower Yangtze valleys.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus