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Significance of Polarization Charges and Isomagnetic Surface in Magnetohydrodynamics.

Liang ZX, Liang Y - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: We discuss this topic and find that in the study of the frozen-in field lines concept, the effects of inductive and capacitive reactance have been omitted.If a fluid does not change its density distribution and shape (can be regarded as a quasi-rigid body) and moves along isomagnetic surface, it can freely traverse magnetic field lines without any magnetic drag, no matter how strong the magnetic field is.Besides theoretical analysis, we also present experimental results to support our analysis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 18-4-102 Shuixiehuadu, Zhufengdajie, Shijiazhuang, Hebei, 050035, China.

ABSTRACT
From the frozen-in field lines concept, a highly conducting fluid can move freely along, but not traverse to, magnetic field lines. We discuss this topic and find that in the study of the frozen-in field lines concept, the effects of inductive and capacitive reactance have been omitted. When admitted, the relationships among the motional electromotive field, the induced electric field, the eddy electric current, and the magnetic field becomes clearer. We emphasize the importance of isomagnetic surfaces and polarization charges, and show analytically that whether a conducting fluid can freely traverse magnetic field lines or not depends solely on the magnetic gradient along the path of the fluid. If a fluid does not change its density distribution and shape (can be regarded as a quasi-rigid body) and moves along isomagnetic surface, it can freely traverse magnetic field lines without any magnetic drag, no matter how strong the magnetic field is. Besides theoretical analysis, we also present experimental results to support our analysis. The main purpose of this work is to correct a fallacy among some astrophysicists.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Third non-frozen scenario.In a cylindrically symmetric magnetic field, the fluid rotation around the magnetic axis would not result in frozen-in drag, even if the outer and inner fluids rotate at different angular speeds. This scenario mirrors the situation near the equatorial plane of aligned pulsar or the Sun.
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pone.0136936.g003: Third non-frozen scenario.In a cylindrically symmetric magnetic field, the fluid rotation around the magnetic axis would not result in frozen-in drag, even if the outer and inner fluids rotate at different angular speeds. This scenario mirrors the situation near the equatorial plane of aligned pulsar or the Sun.

Mentions: If a fluid does not change its density distribution and shape, it can be regarded as a quasi-rigid body. The following simple law applies: When crossing a magnetic field along isomagnetic surface, a rigid or quasi-rigid body will not be subject to any magnetic force, no matter how strong the magnetic field is and how fast the fluid moves. This law fits the scenarios shown in Figs 1, 2 and 3. The three scenarios share two characteristics:


Significance of Polarization Charges and Isomagnetic Surface in Magnetohydrodynamics.

Liang ZX, Liang Y - PLoS ONE (2015)

Third non-frozen scenario.In a cylindrically symmetric magnetic field, the fluid rotation around the magnetic axis would not result in frozen-in drag, even if the outer and inner fluids rotate at different angular speeds. This scenario mirrors the situation near the equatorial plane of aligned pulsar or the Sun.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4556340&req=5

pone.0136936.g003: Third non-frozen scenario.In a cylindrically symmetric magnetic field, the fluid rotation around the magnetic axis would not result in frozen-in drag, even if the outer and inner fluids rotate at different angular speeds. This scenario mirrors the situation near the equatorial plane of aligned pulsar or the Sun.
Mentions: If a fluid does not change its density distribution and shape, it can be regarded as a quasi-rigid body. The following simple law applies: When crossing a magnetic field along isomagnetic surface, a rigid or quasi-rigid body will not be subject to any magnetic force, no matter how strong the magnetic field is and how fast the fluid moves. This law fits the scenarios shown in Figs 1, 2 and 3. The three scenarios share two characteristics:

Bottom Line: We discuss this topic and find that in the study of the frozen-in field lines concept, the effects of inductive and capacitive reactance have been omitted.If a fluid does not change its density distribution and shape (can be regarded as a quasi-rigid body) and moves along isomagnetic surface, it can freely traverse magnetic field lines without any magnetic drag, no matter how strong the magnetic field is.Besides theoretical analysis, we also present experimental results to support our analysis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 18-4-102 Shuixiehuadu, Zhufengdajie, Shijiazhuang, Hebei, 050035, China.

ABSTRACT
From the frozen-in field lines concept, a highly conducting fluid can move freely along, but not traverse to, magnetic field lines. We discuss this topic and find that in the study of the frozen-in field lines concept, the effects of inductive and capacitive reactance have been omitted. When admitted, the relationships among the motional electromotive field, the induced electric field, the eddy electric current, and the magnetic field becomes clearer. We emphasize the importance of isomagnetic surfaces and polarization charges, and show analytically that whether a conducting fluid can freely traverse magnetic field lines or not depends solely on the magnetic gradient along the path of the fluid. If a fluid does not change its density distribution and shape (can be regarded as a quasi-rigid body) and moves along isomagnetic surface, it can freely traverse magnetic field lines without any magnetic drag, no matter how strong the magnetic field is. Besides theoretical analysis, we also present experimental results to support our analysis. The main purpose of this work is to correct a fallacy among some astrophysicists.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus