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Psoriasis and Diabetes: A Multicenter Study in 222078 Type 2 Diabetes Patients Reveals High Levels of Depression.

Schwandt A, Bergis D, Dapp A, Ebner S, Jehle PM, Köppen S, Risse A, Zimny S, Holl RW - J Diabetes Res (2015)

Bottom Line: Severe hypoglycemia (0.31 [0.238; 0.399] versus 0.06 [0.057; 0.060] events per patient-year, p < 0.0001), hypertension (86.1 [81.1; 90.0] versus 68.0 [67.8; 68.2] %, p < 0.0001), and thyroid disease (14.0 [10.1; 19.2] versus 4.6 [4.5; 4.7] %, p < 0.0001) were more prevalent.Depression occurred more often (10.5 [7.1; 15.2] versus 2.8 [2.7; 2.8] %, p < 0.0001).Comorbid conditions and depression were more prevalent, and more intensive diabetes therapy was required.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Epidemiology and Medical Biometry, Central Institute for Biomedical Technology, German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), University of Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 41, 89081 Ulm, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Objective: This study aimed to investigate the association between psoriasis and disease outcome in type 2 diabetes (T2D).

Methods: 222078 T2D patients (≥10 years old) from the prospective, multicenter diabetes patient registry were analyzed. Specific search items were used to identify psoriasis patients. Multiple regression models were fitted and adjusted for demographic confounder.

Results: 232 T2D patients had comorbid psoriasis. After adjusting psoriasis patients revealed a higher BMI (31.8 [31.0; 32.6] versus 30.6 [30.5; 30.6] kg/m2, p = 0.004) and HbA1c (64.8 [62.1; 67.6] versus 59.0 [58.9; 59.1] mmol/mol, p < 0.0001). Insulin was used more frequently (62.3 [55.7; 68.5] versus 50.9 [50.7; 51.1] %, p = 0.001), only OAD/GLP-1 was similar, and nonpharmacological treatment was less common (13.3 [9.5; 18.3] versus 21.9 [21.7; 22.1] %, p = 0.002). Severe hypoglycemia (0.31 [0.238; 0.399] versus 0.06 [0.057; 0.060] events per patient-year, p < 0.0001), hypertension (86.1 [81.1; 90.0] versus 68.0 [67.8; 68.2] %, p < 0.0001), and thyroid disease (14.0 [10.1; 19.2] versus 4.6 [4.5; 4.7] %, p < 0.0001) were more prevalent. Depression occurred more often (10.5 [7.1; 15.2] versus 2.8 [2.7; 2.8] %, p < 0.0001).

Conclusions: Clinical diabetes characteristics in psoriasis T2D patients were clearly worse compared to patients without psoriasis. Comorbid conditions and depression were more prevalent, and more intensive diabetes therapy was required.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Confounder-adjusted estimates for types of diabetes therapy between type 2 diabetes patients with (T2D + psoriasis) and without comorbid psoriasis (T2D − no psoriasis). Diabetes therapy was insulin therapy, oral antidiabetic medication alone (OAD or GLP-1), or nonpharmacological therapy (lifestyle only).
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig2: Confounder-adjusted estimates for types of diabetes therapy between type 2 diabetes patients with (T2D + psoriasis) and without comorbid psoriasis (T2D − no psoriasis). Diabetes therapy was insulin therapy, oral antidiabetic medication alone (OAD or GLP-1), or nonpharmacological therapy (lifestyle only).

Mentions: Figure 2 describes diabetes therapy for T2D patients with and without psoriasis. Insulin therapy was significantly more frequent in patients with psoriasis (p = 0.001). In contrast, nonpharmacological therapy was less frequent in T2D patients with psoriasis. Insulin treatment regime was similar in both groups. No differences were observed for insulin dose in insulin-treated patients (0.68 [0.47; 0.90] versus 0.60 [0.59; 0.60] IU/kg). There were no differences between groups in the use of OAD or GLP-1 agonist alone, and metformin use was similar as well.


Psoriasis and Diabetes: A Multicenter Study in 222078 Type 2 Diabetes Patients Reveals High Levels of Depression.

Schwandt A, Bergis D, Dapp A, Ebner S, Jehle PM, Köppen S, Risse A, Zimny S, Holl RW - J Diabetes Res (2015)

Confounder-adjusted estimates for types of diabetes therapy between type 2 diabetes patients with (T2D + psoriasis) and without comorbid psoriasis (T2D − no psoriasis). Diabetes therapy was insulin therapy, oral antidiabetic medication alone (OAD or GLP-1), or nonpharmacological therapy (lifestyle only).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4556326&req=5

fig2: Confounder-adjusted estimates for types of diabetes therapy between type 2 diabetes patients with (T2D + psoriasis) and without comorbid psoriasis (T2D − no psoriasis). Diabetes therapy was insulin therapy, oral antidiabetic medication alone (OAD or GLP-1), or nonpharmacological therapy (lifestyle only).
Mentions: Figure 2 describes diabetes therapy for T2D patients with and without psoriasis. Insulin therapy was significantly more frequent in patients with psoriasis (p = 0.001). In contrast, nonpharmacological therapy was less frequent in T2D patients with psoriasis. Insulin treatment regime was similar in both groups. No differences were observed for insulin dose in insulin-treated patients (0.68 [0.47; 0.90] versus 0.60 [0.59; 0.60] IU/kg). There were no differences between groups in the use of OAD or GLP-1 agonist alone, and metformin use was similar as well.

Bottom Line: Severe hypoglycemia (0.31 [0.238; 0.399] versus 0.06 [0.057; 0.060] events per patient-year, p < 0.0001), hypertension (86.1 [81.1; 90.0] versus 68.0 [67.8; 68.2] %, p < 0.0001), and thyroid disease (14.0 [10.1; 19.2] versus 4.6 [4.5; 4.7] %, p < 0.0001) were more prevalent.Depression occurred more often (10.5 [7.1; 15.2] versus 2.8 [2.7; 2.8] %, p < 0.0001).Comorbid conditions and depression were more prevalent, and more intensive diabetes therapy was required.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Epidemiology and Medical Biometry, Central Institute for Biomedical Technology, German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), University of Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 41, 89081 Ulm, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Objective: This study aimed to investigate the association between psoriasis and disease outcome in type 2 diabetes (T2D).

Methods: 222078 T2D patients (≥10 years old) from the prospective, multicenter diabetes patient registry were analyzed. Specific search items were used to identify psoriasis patients. Multiple regression models were fitted and adjusted for demographic confounder.

Results: 232 T2D patients had comorbid psoriasis. After adjusting psoriasis patients revealed a higher BMI (31.8 [31.0; 32.6] versus 30.6 [30.5; 30.6] kg/m2, p = 0.004) and HbA1c (64.8 [62.1; 67.6] versus 59.0 [58.9; 59.1] mmol/mol, p < 0.0001). Insulin was used more frequently (62.3 [55.7; 68.5] versus 50.9 [50.7; 51.1] %, p = 0.001), only OAD/GLP-1 was similar, and nonpharmacological treatment was less common (13.3 [9.5; 18.3] versus 21.9 [21.7; 22.1] %, p = 0.002). Severe hypoglycemia (0.31 [0.238; 0.399] versus 0.06 [0.057; 0.060] events per patient-year, p < 0.0001), hypertension (86.1 [81.1; 90.0] versus 68.0 [67.8; 68.2] %, p < 0.0001), and thyroid disease (14.0 [10.1; 19.2] versus 4.6 [4.5; 4.7] %, p < 0.0001) were more prevalent. Depression occurred more often (10.5 [7.1; 15.2] versus 2.8 [2.7; 2.8] %, p < 0.0001).

Conclusions: Clinical diabetes characteristics in psoriasis T2D patients were clearly worse compared to patients without psoriasis. Comorbid conditions and depression were more prevalent, and more intensive diabetes therapy was required.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus