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Acute kidney injury: preclinical innovations, challenges, and opportunities for translation.

Silver SA, Cardinal H, Colwell K, Burger D, Dickhout JG - Can J Kidney Health Dis (2015)

Bottom Line: MEDLINE, ISI Web of Science.As such, it does not represent a systematic review of all of the AKI literature.Translation of findings from biomedical research into AKI therapy presents several challenges.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Nephrology, St. Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Background: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a clinically important condition that has attracted a great deal of interest from the biomedical research community. However, acute kidney injury AKI research findings have yet to be translated into significant changes in clinical practice.

Objective: This article reviews many of the preclinical innovations in acute kidney injury AKI treatment, and explores challenges and opportunities to translate these finding into clinical practice.

Sources of information: MEDLINE, ISI Web of Science.

Findings: This paper details areas in biomedical research where translation of pre-clinical findings into clinical trials is ongoing, or nearing a point where trial design is warranted. Further, the paper examines ways that best practice in the management of AKI can reach a broader proportion of the patient population experiencing this condition.

Limitations: This review highlights pertinent literature from the perspective of the research interests of the authors for new translational work in AKI. As such, it does not represent a systematic review of all of the AKI literature.

Implications: Translation of findings from biomedical research into AKI therapy presents several challenges. These may be partly overcome by targeting populations for interventional trials where the likelihood of AKI is very high, and readily predictable. Further, specific clinics to follow-up with patients after AKI events hold promise to provide best practice in care, and to translate therapies into treatment for the broadest possible patient populations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Bridging the "Death Valleys" of the Canadian healthcare landscape. Depiction of the barriers to putting research into practice in the Canadian healthcare landscape. In order to ensure that the system is sustainable and to enhance health outcomes, it is critical to bridge the gap between research and clinical practice. Valley 1 depicts the limited ability to translate information from basic biomedical research to clinical science and knowledge. Valley 2 depicts the inadequacy of the current healthcare system in synthesizing, disseminating and integrating research results into clinical practice and healthcare decision-making. To bridge the "Death Valleys" of the healthcare landscape, collective engagement in the strategy from all levels of government and the research community is necessary
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Fig1: Bridging the "Death Valleys" of the Canadian healthcare landscape. Depiction of the barriers to putting research into practice in the Canadian healthcare landscape. In order to ensure that the system is sustainable and to enhance health outcomes, it is critical to bridge the gap between research and clinical practice. Valley 1 depicts the limited ability to translate information from basic biomedical research to clinical science and knowledge. Valley 2 depicts the inadequacy of the current healthcare system in synthesizing, disseminating and integrating research results into clinical practice and healthcare decision-making. To bridge the "Death Valleys" of the healthcare landscape, collective engagement in the strategy from all levels of government and the research community is necessary

Mentions: The discrepancy between the new knowledge gained through biomedical and clinical research and actual improvements in patient care or health service organization for patients suffering from AKI illustrates a major challenge faced by the Canadian research community. Although Canada excels in biomedical research capacity and innovations, translation of these innovations into meaningful patient-based applications is a significant problem. Further, even when human applications and improvements in patient care are identified, the translation of this new knowledge into widespread clinical practice remains problematic [7]. This conundrum can be represented by a model depicting two "death valleys" of the biomedical research to clinical practice continuum (Fig. 1). A major funder of health-related research in Canada, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), argues for initiatives that will bring biomedical discoveries to the bedside (bridging valley 1) and translate findings from biomedical and clinical research into relevant healthcare decision making (bridging valley 2) [7]. The purpose of this review is to address some of the challenges and opportunities to bridge these two "death valleys" in the field of AKI research.Fig. 1


Acute kidney injury: preclinical innovations, challenges, and opportunities for translation.

Silver SA, Cardinal H, Colwell K, Burger D, Dickhout JG - Can J Kidney Health Dis (2015)

Bridging the "Death Valleys" of the Canadian healthcare landscape. Depiction of the barriers to putting research into practice in the Canadian healthcare landscape. In order to ensure that the system is sustainable and to enhance health outcomes, it is critical to bridge the gap between research and clinical practice. Valley 1 depicts the limited ability to translate information from basic biomedical research to clinical science and knowledge. Valley 2 depicts the inadequacy of the current healthcare system in synthesizing, disseminating and integrating research results into clinical practice and healthcare decision-making. To bridge the "Death Valleys" of the healthcare landscape, collective engagement in the strategy from all levels of government and the research community is necessary
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4556308&req=5

Fig1: Bridging the "Death Valleys" of the Canadian healthcare landscape. Depiction of the barriers to putting research into practice in the Canadian healthcare landscape. In order to ensure that the system is sustainable and to enhance health outcomes, it is critical to bridge the gap between research and clinical practice. Valley 1 depicts the limited ability to translate information from basic biomedical research to clinical science and knowledge. Valley 2 depicts the inadequacy of the current healthcare system in synthesizing, disseminating and integrating research results into clinical practice and healthcare decision-making. To bridge the "Death Valleys" of the healthcare landscape, collective engagement in the strategy from all levels of government and the research community is necessary
Mentions: The discrepancy between the new knowledge gained through biomedical and clinical research and actual improvements in patient care or health service organization for patients suffering from AKI illustrates a major challenge faced by the Canadian research community. Although Canada excels in biomedical research capacity and innovations, translation of these innovations into meaningful patient-based applications is a significant problem. Further, even when human applications and improvements in patient care are identified, the translation of this new knowledge into widespread clinical practice remains problematic [7]. This conundrum can be represented by a model depicting two "death valleys" of the biomedical research to clinical practice continuum (Fig. 1). A major funder of health-related research in Canada, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), argues for initiatives that will bring biomedical discoveries to the bedside (bridging valley 1) and translate findings from biomedical and clinical research into relevant healthcare decision making (bridging valley 2) [7]. The purpose of this review is to address some of the challenges and opportunities to bridge these two "death valleys" in the field of AKI research.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: MEDLINE, ISI Web of Science.As such, it does not represent a systematic review of all of the AKI literature.Translation of findings from biomedical research into AKI therapy presents several challenges.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Nephrology, St. Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Background: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a clinically important condition that has attracted a great deal of interest from the biomedical research community. However, acute kidney injury AKI research findings have yet to be translated into significant changes in clinical practice.

Objective: This article reviews many of the preclinical innovations in acute kidney injury AKI treatment, and explores challenges and opportunities to translate these finding into clinical practice.

Sources of information: MEDLINE, ISI Web of Science.

Findings: This paper details areas in biomedical research where translation of pre-clinical findings into clinical trials is ongoing, or nearing a point where trial design is warranted. Further, the paper examines ways that best practice in the management of AKI can reach a broader proportion of the patient population experiencing this condition.

Limitations: This review highlights pertinent literature from the perspective of the research interests of the authors for new translational work in AKI. As such, it does not represent a systematic review of all of the AKI literature.

Implications: Translation of findings from biomedical research into AKI therapy presents several challenges. These may be partly overcome by targeting populations for interventional trials where the likelihood of AKI is very high, and readily predictable. Further, specific clinics to follow-up with patients after AKI events hold promise to provide best practice in care, and to translate therapies into treatment for the broadest possible patient populations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus