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Clinical utility of platinum chromium bare-metal stents in coronary heart disease.

Jorge C, Dubois C - Med Devices (Auckl) (2015)

Bottom Line: Later, cobalt chromium stent alloys outperformed steel as the material of choice for stents, allowing latest generation stents to be designed with significantly thinner struts, while maintaining corrosion resistance and radial strength.Most recently, the introduction of the platinum chromium alloy refined stent architecture with thin struts, high radial strength, conformability, and improved radiopacity.Mechanical properties, clinical utility, and device limitations will be summarized and put into perspective.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.

ABSTRACT
Coronary stents represent a key development for the treatment of obstructive coronary artery disease since the introduction of percutaneous coronary intervention. While drug-eluting stents gained wide acceptance in contemporary percutaneous coronary intervention practice, further developments in bare-metal stents remain crucial for patients who are not candidates for drug-eluting stents, or to improve metallic platforms for drug elution. Initially, stent platforms used biologically inert stainless steel, restricting stent performance due to limitations in flexibility and strut thickness. Later, cobalt chromium stent alloys outperformed steel as the material of choice for stents, allowing latest generation stents to be designed with significantly thinner struts, while maintaining corrosion resistance and radial strength. Most recently, the introduction of the platinum chromium alloy refined stent architecture with thin struts, high radial strength, conformability, and improved radiopacity. This review will provide an overview of the novel platinum chromium bare-metal stent platforms available for coronary intervention. Mechanical properties, clinical utility, and device limitations will be summarized and put into perspective.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

SCAAR stent thrombosis rates with various bare-metal stents.Notes: The graph presents cumulative adjusted risk of definitive stent thrombosis with frequently used bare-metal stents in Sweden between 2007 and 2013. Coroflex Blue, Multilink Vision, and Multilink 8 use a cobalt chromium alloy (CoCr); Titan: titanium stent with nitric oxide coating; Integrity uses cobalt nickel alloy (CoNi); Omega uses the platinum chromium alloy (PtCr). Modified with permission from SCAAR. Swedish Coronary Angiography and Angioplasty Registry. 2015. Available from: http://www.ucr.uu.se/swedeheart/index.php/forskning-scaar/in-english/stent-reports. Accessed April 1, 2015.39
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f4-mder-8-359: SCAAR stent thrombosis rates with various bare-metal stents.Notes: The graph presents cumulative adjusted risk of definitive stent thrombosis with frequently used bare-metal stents in Sweden between 2007 and 2013. Coroflex Blue, Multilink Vision, and Multilink 8 use a cobalt chromium alloy (CoCr); Titan: titanium stent with nitric oxide coating; Integrity uses cobalt nickel alloy (CoNi); Omega uses the platinum chromium alloy (PtCr). Modified with permission from SCAAR. Swedish Coronary Angiography and Angioplasty Registry. 2015. Available from: http://www.ucr.uu.se/swedeheart/index.php/forskning-scaar/in-english/stent-reports. Accessed April 1, 2015.39

Mentions: Finally, low rates of definitive stent thrombosis were reported with the PtCr Omega stent in the SCAAR registry, including 174,703 BMS and DES implanted since 2007 to October 2013 (Figure 4).39


Clinical utility of platinum chromium bare-metal stents in coronary heart disease.

Jorge C, Dubois C - Med Devices (Auckl) (2015)

SCAAR stent thrombosis rates with various bare-metal stents.Notes: The graph presents cumulative adjusted risk of definitive stent thrombosis with frequently used bare-metal stents in Sweden between 2007 and 2013. Coroflex Blue, Multilink Vision, and Multilink 8 use a cobalt chromium alloy (CoCr); Titan: titanium stent with nitric oxide coating; Integrity uses cobalt nickel alloy (CoNi); Omega uses the platinum chromium alloy (PtCr). Modified with permission from SCAAR. Swedish Coronary Angiography and Angioplasty Registry. 2015. Available from: http://www.ucr.uu.se/swedeheart/index.php/forskning-scaar/in-english/stent-reports. Accessed April 1, 2015.39
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4556305&req=5

f4-mder-8-359: SCAAR stent thrombosis rates with various bare-metal stents.Notes: The graph presents cumulative adjusted risk of definitive stent thrombosis with frequently used bare-metal stents in Sweden between 2007 and 2013. Coroflex Blue, Multilink Vision, and Multilink 8 use a cobalt chromium alloy (CoCr); Titan: titanium stent with nitric oxide coating; Integrity uses cobalt nickel alloy (CoNi); Omega uses the platinum chromium alloy (PtCr). Modified with permission from SCAAR. Swedish Coronary Angiography and Angioplasty Registry. 2015. Available from: http://www.ucr.uu.se/swedeheart/index.php/forskning-scaar/in-english/stent-reports. Accessed April 1, 2015.39
Mentions: Finally, low rates of definitive stent thrombosis were reported with the PtCr Omega stent in the SCAAR registry, including 174,703 BMS and DES implanted since 2007 to October 2013 (Figure 4).39

Bottom Line: Later, cobalt chromium stent alloys outperformed steel as the material of choice for stents, allowing latest generation stents to be designed with significantly thinner struts, while maintaining corrosion resistance and radial strength.Most recently, the introduction of the platinum chromium alloy refined stent architecture with thin struts, high radial strength, conformability, and improved radiopacity.Mechanical properties, clinical utility, and device limitations will be summarized and put into perspective.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.

ABSTRACT
Coronary stents represent a key development for the treatment of obstructive coronary artery disease since the introduction of percutaneous coronary intervention. While drug-eluting stents gained wide acceptance in contemporary percutaneous coronary intervention practice, further developments in bare-metal stents remain crucial for patients who are not candidates for drug-eluting stents, or to improve metallic platforms for drug elution. Initially, stent platforms used biologically inert stainless steel, restricting stent performance due to limitations in flexibility and strut thickness. Later, cobalt chromium stent alloys outperformed steel as the material of choice for stents, allowing latest generation stents to be designed with significantly thinner struts, while maintaining corrosion resistance and radial strength. Most recently, the introduction of the platinum chromium alloy refined stent architecture with thin struts, high radial strength, conformability, and improved radiopacity. This review will provide an overview of the novel platinum chromium bare-metal stent platforms available for coronary intervention. Mechanical properties, clinical utility, and device limitations will be summarized and put into perspective.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus