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Spherulitic copper-copper oxide nanostructure-based highly sensitive nonenzymatic glucose sensor.

Das G, Tran TQ, Yoon HH - Int J Nanomedicine (2015)

Bottom Line: In addition, this electrode was found to be resistant to interference by common interfering agents such as urea, cystamine, L-ascorbic acid, and creatinine.The high performance of the Cu-CuO spherulites with nanowire-to-nanorod outgrowths was primarily due to the high surface area and stability, and good three-dimensional structure.Furthermore, the ITO/MWCNT/Cu-CuOB electrode applied to real urine and serum sample showed satisfactory performance.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Gachon University, Seongnam, Republic of South Korea.

ABSTRACT
In this work, three different spherulitic nanostructures Cu-CuOA, Cu-CuOB, and Cu-CuOC were synthesized in water-in-oil microemulsions by varying the surfactant concentration (30 mM, 40 mM, and 50 mM, respectively). The structural and morphological characteristics of the Cu-CuO nanostructures were investigated by ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy techniques. The synthesized nanostructures were deposited on multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-modified indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes to fabricate a nonenzymatic highly sensitive amperometric glucose sensor. The performance of the ITO/MWCNT/Cu-CuO electrodes in the glucose assay was examined by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometric studies. The sensitivity of the sensor varied with the spherulite type; Cu-CuOA, Cu-CuOB, and Cu-CuOC exhibited a sensitivity of 1,229, 3,012, and 3,642 µA mM(-1)·cm(-2), respectively. Moreover, the linear range is dependent on the structure types: 0.023-0.29 mM, 0.07-0.8 mM, and 0.023-0.34 mM for Cu-CuOA, Cu-CuOB, and Cu-CuOC, respectively. An excellent response time of 3 seconds and a low detection limit of 2 µM were observed for Cu-CuOB at an applied potential of +0.34 V. In addition, this electrode was found to be resistant to interference by common interfering agents such as urea, cystamine, L-ascorbic acid, and creatinine. The high performance of the Cu-CuO spherulites with nanowire-to-nanorod outgrowths was primarily due to the high surface area and stability, and good three-dimensional structure. Furthermore, the ITO/MWCNT/Cu-CuOB electrode applied to real urine and serum sample showed satisfactory performance.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Electrochemical response plots of the different Cu-CuO electrodes.Notes: Cyclic voltammograms obtained at 20 mV s−1 for (A) ITO/MWCNT/Cu–CuOA, (B) ITO/MWCNT/Cu–CuOB, (C) ITO/MWCNT/Cu–CuOC, and (D) ITO/MWCNT, in the absence and in the presence of a 10 mM glucose solution.Abbreviations: ITO, indium tin oxide; MWCNT, multiwalled carbon nanotube.
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f5-ijn-10-165: Electrochemical response plots of the different Cu-CuO electrodes.Notes: Cyclic voltammograms obtained at 20 mV s−1 for (A) ITO/MWCNT/Cu–CuOA, (B) ITO/MWCNT/Cu–CuOB, (C) ITO/MWCNT/Cu–CuOC, and (D) ITO/MWCNT, in the absence and in the presence of a 10 mM glucose solution.Abbreviations: ITO, indium tin oxide; MWCNT, multiwalled carbon nanotube.

Mentions: The electrochemical activity of the Cu–CuO samples in alkaline medium is depicted in the CV plots shown in Figure 5. The electrodes exhibited no peaks in the measured potential range; however, upon addition of glucose, a sharp increase in the current is observed for the experimental Cu–CuO electrodes. However, the control electrode, that is, ITO/MWCNT, showed no variation in the current signal, indicating that Cu–CuO was solely responsible for the catalytic oxidation of glucose. The morphology of the nanostructures played a significant role in tuning the electrochemical activity. ITO/MWCNT/Cu–CuOB (Figure 6B) exhibited the highest current density of 4.19 mA cm−2 (after background current correction) at +0.9 V. Although no oxidation peak was detected in the plots, the current showed a sharp increase at potentials corresponding to the onset oxidation potential for glucose oxidation, which has been reported elsewhere.10,41 The onset oxidation potential for ITO/MWCNT/Cu–CuOA, ITO/MWCNT/Cu–CuOB, and ITO/MWCNT/Cu–CuOC was observed at +0.36 V, +0.34 V, and +0.15 V, respectively. The electrooxidation of glucose over copper-based material has been widely reviewed in the recent literature, and the formation of the redox couple Cu (II)–Cu (III) in an alkaline medium has been considered to play a significant role in the oxidation process.41,42 The deprotonation of glucose and isomerization to the enediol form has been suggested to initiate the oxidation process.43


Spherulitic copper-copper oxide nanostructure-based highly sensitive nonenzymatic glucose sensor.

Das G, Tran TQ, Yoon HH - Int J Nanomedicine (2015)

Electrochemical response plots of the different Cu-CuO electrodes.Notes: Cyclic voltammograms obtained at 20 mV s−1 for (A) ITO/MWCNT/Cu–CuOA, (B) ITO/MWCNT/Cu–CuOB, (C) ITO/MWCNT/Cu–CuOC, and (D) ITO/MWCNT, in the absence and in the presence of a 10 mM glucose solution.Abbreviations: ITO, indium tin oxide; MWCNT, multiwalled carbon nanotube.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4556295&req=5

f5-ijn-10-165: Electrochemical response plots of the different Cu-CuO electrodes.Notes: Cyclic voltammograms obtained at 20 mV s−1 for (A) ITO/MWCNT/Cu–CuOA, (B) ITO/MWCNT/Cu–CuOB, (C) ITO/MWCNT/Cu–CuOC, and (D) ITO/MWCNT, in the absence and in the presence of a 10 mM glucose solution.Abbreviations: ITO, indium tin oxide; MWCNT, multiwalled carbon nanotube.
Mentions: The electrochemical activity of the Cu–CuO samples in alkaline medium is depicted in the CV plots shown in Figure 5. The electrodes exhibited no peaks in the measured potential range; however, upon addition of glucose, a sharp increase in the current is observed for the experimental Cu–CuO electrodes. However, the control electrode, that is, ITO/MWCNT, showed no variation in the current signal, indicating that Cu–CuO was solely responsible for the catalytic oxidation of glucose. The morphology of the nanostructures played a significant role in tuning the electrochemical activity. ITO/MWCNT/Cu–CuOB (Figure 6B) exhibited the highest current density of 4.19 mA cm−2 (after background current correction) at +0.9 V. Although no oxidation peak was detected in the plots, the current showed a sharp increase at potentials corresponding to the onset oxidation potential for glucose oxidation, which has been reported elsewhere.10,41 The onset oxidation potential for ITO/MWCNT/Cu–CuOA, ITO/MWCNT/Cu–CuOB, and ITO/MWCNT/Cu–CuOC was observed at +0.36 V, +0.34 V, and +0.15 V, respectively. The electrooxidation of glucose over copper-based material has been widely reviewed in the recent literature, and the formation of the redox couple Cu (II)–Cu (III) in an alkaline medium has been considered to play a significant role in the oxidation process.41,42 The deprotonation of glucose and isomerization to the enediol form has been suggested to initiate the oxidation process.43

Bottom Line: In addition, this electrode was found to be resistant to interference by common interfering agents such as urea, cystamine, L-ascorbic acid, and creatinine.The high performance of the Cu-CuO spherulites with nanowire-to-nanorod outgrowths was primarily due to the high surface area and stability, and good three-dimensional structure.Furthermore, the ITO/MWCNT/Cu-CuOB electrode applied to real urine and serum sample showed satisfactory performance.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Gachon University, Seongnam, Republic of South Korea.

ABSTRACT
In this work, three different spherulitic nanostructures Cu-CuOA, Cu-CuOB, and Cu-CuOC were synthesized in water-in-oil microemulsions by varying the surfactant concentration (30 mM, 40 mM, and 50 mM, respectively). The structural and morphological characteristics of the Cu-CuO nanostructures were investigated by ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy techniques. The synthesized nanostructures were deposited on multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-modified indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes to fabricate a nonenzymatic highly sensitive amperometric glucose sensor. The performance of the ITO/MWCNT/Cu-CuO electrodes in the glucose assay was examined by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometric studies. The sensitivity of the sensor varied with the spherulite type; Cu-CuOA, Cu-CuOB, and Cu-CuOC exhibited a sensitivity of 1,229, 3,012, and 3,642 µA mM(-1)·cm(-2), respectively. Moreover, the linear range is dependent on the structure types: 0.023-0.29 mM, 0.07-0.8 mM, and 0.023-0.34 mM for Cu-CuOA, Cu-CuOB, and Cu-CuOC, respectively. An excellent response time of 3 seconds and a low detection limit of 2 µM were observed for Cu-CuOB at an applied potential of +0.34 V. In addition, this electrode was found to be resistant to interference by common interfering agents such as urea, cystamine, L-ascorbic acid, and creatinine. The high performance of the Cu-CuO spherulites with nanowire-to-nanorod outgrowths was primarily due to the high surface area and stability, and good three-dimensional structure. Furthermore, the ITO/MWCNT/Cu-CuOB electrode applied to real urine and serum sample showed satisfactory performance.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus