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The role of pediatricians as key stakeholders in influencing immunization policy decisions for the introduction of meningitis B vaccine in Canada: The Ontario perspective.

Yamashiro H, Cutcliffe N, Dobson S, Fisman D, Gold R - Can J Infect Dis Med Microbiol (2015 Jul-Aug)

Bottom Line: The recently approved four-component meningococcal B (4CMenB) vaccine should be recommended and funded as part of Ontario's routine immunization schedule and should also be mandated for school attendance.Broadly, the goals are to assist individual practitioners in advocating the benefits of 4CMenB vaccination to parents, and to counterbalance recommendations from the National Advisory Committee on Immunization and the Canadian Paediatric Society.Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Pediatrics Section, Ontario Medical Association (PSOMA) and Pediatricians Alliance of Ontario (PAO); 'Pediatricians of Ontario'

ABSTRACT
As key stakeholders in immunization policy decisions, the Pediatricians of Ontario held an accredited conference on January 18, 2014, to discuss prevention of invasive meningococcal disease. Five key recommendations were put forth regarding immunization strategies to protect children from meningococcal serogroup B disease. The recently approved four-component meningococcal B (4CMenB) vaccine should be recommended and funded as part of Ontario's routine immunization schedule and should also be mandated for school attendance. Public funding for 4CMenB immunization is justified based on current MenB epidemiology, vaccine coverage, cost effectiveness and acceptability, as well as legal, political and ethical considerations related to 4CMenB immunization, particularly because routine recommendations and funding are currently in place for vaccination against meningococcal serogroups that cause significantly less disease in Canada than MenB. Broadly, the goals are to assist individual practitioners in advocating the benefits of 4CMenB vaccination to parents, and to counterbalance recommendations from the National Advisory Committee on Immunization and the Canadian Paediatric Society.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Annual incidence of invasive meningococcal disease according to serogroup in Ontario, 2000 to 2006
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f2-jidmm-26-183: Annual incidence of invasive meningococcal disease according to serogroup in Ontario, 2000 to 2006

Mentions: In Ontario, the annual incidence of MenB from 2000 to 2010 ranged from 0.11 to 0.27 per 100,000 (12). Of key importance, the incidence of IMD due to MenC was 0.27 per 100,000 in 2001, at the peak of the outbreak, and was 0.10 per 100,000 at the time of introducing the MenC conjugate vaccine in 2005 (Figure 2) (13). It should be emphasized that MenB incidence was higher than that of MenC in 2005 (0.15 per 100,000) and has remained above this level (ranging from 0.11 to 0.27 per 100,000 from 2005 to 2010) (12). The same trends have been observed nationally, with MenB incidence exceeding that of MenC every year between 2002 to 2009 (14). These incidence data, combined with the frequency of death and disabling sequelae, provide a strong rationale to extend IMD prevention by introducing routine immunizing programs to protect against serogroup B.


The role of pediatricians as key stakeholders in influencing immunization policy decisions for the introduction of meningitis B vaccine in Canada: The Ontario perspective.

Yamashiro H, Cutcliffe N, Dobson S, Fisman D, Gold R - Can J Infect Dis Med Microbiol (2015 Jul-Aug)

Annual incidence of invasive meningococcal disease according to serogroup in Ontario, 2000 to 2006
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4556178&req=5

f2-jidmm-26-183: Annual incidence of invasive meningococcal disease according to serogroup in Ontario, 2000 to 2006
Mentions: In Ontario, the annual incidence of MenB from 2000 to 2010 ranged from 0.11 to 0.27 per 100,000 (12). Of key importance, the incidence of IMD due to MenC was 0.27 per 100,000 in 2001, at the peak of the outbreak, and was 0.10 per 100,000 at the time of introducing the MenC conjugate vaccine in 2005 (Figure 2) (13). It should be emphasized that MenB incidence was higher than that of MenC in 2005 (0.15 per 100,000) and has remained above this level (ranging from 0.11 to 0.27 per 100,000 from 2005 to 2010) (12). The same trends have been observed nationally, with MenB incidence exceeding that of MenC every year between 2002 to 2009 (14). These incidence data, combined with the frequency of death and disabling sequelae, provide a strong rationale to extend IMD prevention by introducing routine immunizing programs to protect against serogroup B.

Bottom Line: The recently approved four-component meningococcal B (4CMenB) vaccine should be recommended and funded as part of Ontario's routine immunization schedule and should also be mandated for school attendance.Broadly, the goals are to assist individual practitioners in advocating the benefits of 4CMenB vaccination to parents, and to counterbalance recommendations from the National Advisory Committee on Immunization and the Canadian Paediatric Society.Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Pediatrics Section, Ontario Medical Association (PSOMA) and Pediatricians Alliance of Ontario (PAO); 'Pediatricians of Ontario'

ABSTRACT
As key stakeholders in immunization policy decisions, the Pediatricians of Ontario held an accredited conference on January 18, 2014, to discuss prevention of invasive meningococcal disease. Five key recommendations were put forth regarding immunization strategies to protect children from meningococcal serogroup B disease. The recently approved four-component meningococcal B (4CMenB) vaccine should be recommended and funded as part of Ontario's routine immunization schedule and should also be mandated for school attendance. Public funding for 4CMenB immunization is justified based on current MenB epidemiology, vaccine coverage, cost effectiveness and acceptability, as well as legal, political and ethical considerations related to 4CMenB immunization, particularly because routine recommendations and funding are currently in place for vaccination against meningococcal serogroups that cause significantly less disease in Canada than MenB. Broadly, the goals are to assist individual practitioners in advocating the benefits of 4CMenB vaccination to parents, and to counterbalance recommendations from the National Advisory Committee on Immunization and the Canadian Paediatric Society.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus