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Watch-wearing as a marker of conscientiousness.

Ellis DA, Jenkins R - PeerJ (2015)

Bottom Line: Significantly higher levels of conscientiousness were observed in participants who wore a watch.In a third study (N = 85), watch wearers arrived significantly earlier to appointments in comparison to controls.These results are discussed in relation to enclothed cognition and the rise of wearable technology including smartwatches.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Lancaster University , UK.

ABSTRACT
Several aspects of an individual's appearance have been shown to predict personality and related behaviour. While some of these cues are grounded in biology (e.g., the human face), other aspects of a person's appearance can be actively controlled (e.g., clothing). In this paper, we consider a common fashion accessory, the wristwatch. In an exploratory sample (N > 100) and a confirmatory sample (N > 600), we compared big-five personality traits between individuals who do or do not regularly wear a standard wristwatch. Significantly higher levels of conscientiousness were observed in participants who wore a watch. In a third study (N = 85), watch wearers arrived significantly earlier to appointments in comparison to controls. These results are discussed in relation to enclothed cognition and the rise of wearable technology including smartwatches.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Differences in arrival times between watch and non-watch wearers.
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fig-1: Differences in arrival times between watch and non-watch wearers.

Mentions: Participants who exceeded an early or late arrival time of ±15 min were removed from the analysis (N = 5) to ensure that data were normally distributed. On average, the remaining participants arrived 2.19 min before the appointed time (SD = 5.95). Mean punctuality scores (minutes late or early) were calculated for watch and non-watch wearers. A total of 34 watch wearers and 51 non-watch wearers arrival times were analysed (Fig. 1).


Watch-wearing as a marker of conscientiousness.

Ellis DA, Jenkins R - PeerJ (2015)

Differences in arrival times between watch and non-watch wearers.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4556152&req=5

fig-1: Differences in arrival times between watch and non-watch wearers.
Mentions: Participants who exceeded an early or late arrival time of ±15 min were removed from the analysis (N = 5) to ensure that data were normally distributed. On average, the remaining participants arrived 2.19 min before the appointed time (SD = 5.95). Mean punctuality scores (minutes late or early) were calculated for watch and non-watch wearers. A total of 34 watch wearers and 51 non-watch wearers arrival times were analysed (Fig. 1).

Bottom Line: Significantly higher levels of conscientiousness were observed in participants who wore a watch.In a third study (N = 85), watch wearers arrived significantly earlier to appointments in comparison to controls.These results are discussed in relation to enclothed cognition and the rise of wearable technology including smartwatches.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Lancaster University , UK.

ABSTRACT
Several aspects of an individual's appearance have been shown to predict personality and related behaviour. While some of these cues are grounded in biology (e.g., the human face), other aspects of a person's appearance can be actively controlled (e.g., clothing). In this paper, we consider a common fashion accessory, the wristwatch. In an exploratory sample (N > 100) and a confirmatory sample (N > 600), we compared big-five personality traits between individuals who do or do not regularly wear a standard wristwatch. Significantly higher levels of conscientiousness were observed in participants who wore a watch. In a third study (N = 85), watch wearers arrived significantly earlier to appointments in comparison to controls. These results are discussed in relation to enclothed cognition and the rise of wearable technology including smartwatches.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus