Limits...
Oyster reef restoration supports increased nekton biomass and potential commercial fishery value.

Humphries AT, La Peyre MK - PeerJ (2015)

Bottom Line: As a result, justification for management activities increasingly asks for two lines of evidence: (1) biological proof of augmented ecosystem function or service, and (2) monetary valuation of these services.For oyster reefs, which have seen significant global declines and increasing restoration work, the need to provide both biological and monetary evidence of reef services on a local-level has become more critical in a time of declining resources.Overall, and with little change over time, fish and invertebrate biomass is 212% greater at restored oyster reefs than mud-bottom, or 0.12 kg m(-2).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Renewable Natural Resources, Louisiana State University, AgCenter , Baton Rouge, LA , USA ; Atlantic Ecology Division, United States Environmental Protection Agency , Narragansett, RI , USA ; Current affiliation: College of the Environment and Life Sciences, University of Rhode Island , Kingston, RI , USA.

ABSTRACT
Across the globe, discussions centered on the value of nature drive many conservation and restoration decisions. As a result, justification for management activities increasingly asks for two lines of evidence: (1) biological proof of augmented ecosystem function or service, and (2) monetary valuation of these services. For oyster reefs, which have seen significant global declines and increasing restoration work, the need to provide both biological and monetary evidence of reef services on a local-level has become more critical in a time of declining resources. Here, we quantified species biomass and potential commercial value of nekton collected from restored oyster (Crassostrea virginica) reefs in coastal Louisiana over a 3-year period, providing multiple snapshots of biomass support over time. Overall, and with little change over time, fish and invertebrate biomass is 212% greater at restored oyster reefs than mud-bottom, or 0.12 kg m(-2). The additional biomass of commercial species is equivalent to an increase of local fisheries value by 226%, or $0.09 m(-2). Understanding the ecosystem value of restoration projects, and how they interact with regional management priorities, is critical to inform local decision-making and provide testable predictions. Quantitative estimates of potential commercial fisheries enhancement by oyster reef restoration such as this one can be used directly by local managers to determine the expected return on investment.

No MeSH data available.


Nekton species biomass.Mean (±one standard error) nekton biomass (kg m−2) of dominant (i.e., >3% of total biomass) species captured with (A) gill net, (B) seine, and (C) trays at at all experimental oyster reef and paired reference mud-bottom sites. Significant differences between reef and mud-bottom reference values are indicated by an asterisk (p < 0.05).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4556142&req=5

fig-3: Nekton species biomass.Mean (±one standard error) nekton biomass (kg m−2) of dominant (i.e., >3% of total biomass) species captured with (A) gill net, (B) seine, and (C) trays at at all experimental oyster reef and paired reference mud-bottom sites. Significant differences between reef and mud-bottom reference values are indicated by an asterisk (p < 0.05).

Mentions: All species except Northern puffer (Sphoeroides maculatus) collected in gill nets had higher biomass at oyster reefs than mud-bottom (Table 3 and Fig. 3). However, only sheepshead (Archosargus probatocephalus) was statistically significant (p < 0.01). In seines, no species showed significant differences in pairwise t-tests, although Gulf menhaden (Brevoortia patronus), brown shrimp (Penaeus aztecus), blue crab (Callinectes sapidus), and bay anchovy (Anchoa mitchilli) all had higher biomass values at oyster reefs. All species except blue crab had higher biomass at oyster reefs in tray samples, and four species were statistically significant: speckled eel (Myrophis punctatus), mud crab (Panopeus herbstii), naked goby (Gobiosoma bosc), and freckled blenny (Hypsoblennius ionthas) (p < 0.05). One exception to this trend was the blue crab, which had greater biomass at mud-bottom (p < 0.01).


Oyster reef restoration supports increased nekton biomass and potential commercial fishery value.

Humphries AT, La Peyre MK - PeerJ (2015)

Nekton species biomass.Mean (±one standard error) nekton biomass (kg m−2) of dominant (i.e., >3% of total biomass) species captured with (A) gill net, (B) seine, and (C) trays at at all experimental oyster reef and paired reference mud-bottom sites. Significant differences between reef and mud-bottom reference values are indicated by an asterisk (p < 0.05).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4556142&req=5

fig-3: Nekton species biomass.Mean (±one standard error) nekton biomass (kg m−2) of dominant (i.e., >3% of total biomass) species captured with (A) gill net, (B) seine, and (C) trays at at all experimental oyster reef and paired reference mud-bottom sites. Significant differences between reef and mud-bottom reference values are indicated by an asterisk (p < 0.05).
Mentions: All species except Northern puffer (Sphoeroides maculatus) collected in gill nets had higher biomass at oyster reefs than mud-bottom (Table 3 and Fig. 3). However, only sheepshead (Archosargus probatocephalus) was statistically significant (p < 0.01). In seines, no species showed significant differences in pairwise t-tests, although Gulf menhaden (Brevoortia patronus), brown shrimp (Penaeus aztecus), blue crab (Callinectes sapidus), and bay anchovy (Anchoa mitchilli) all had higher biomass values at oyster reefs. All species except blue crab had higher biomass at oyster reefs in tray samples, and four species were statistically significant: speckled eel (Myrophis punctatus), mud crab (Panopeus herbstii), naked goby (Gobiosoma bosc), and freckled blenny (Hypsoblennius ionthas) (p < 0.05). One exception to this trend was the blue crab, which had greater biomass at mud-bottom (p < 0.01).

Bottom Line: As a result, justification for management activities increasingly asks for two lines of evidence: (1) biological proof of augmented ecosystem function or service, and (2) monetary valuation of these services.For oyster reefs, which have seen significant global declines and increasing restoration work, the need to provide both biological and monetary evidence of reef services on a local-level has become more critical in a time of declining resources.Overall, and with little change over time, fish and invertebrate biomass is 212% greater at restored oyster reefs than mud-bottom, or 0.12 kg m(-2).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Renewable Natural Resources, Louisiana State University, AgCenter , Baton Rouge, LA , USA ; Atlantic Ecology Division, United States Environmental Protection Agency , Narragansett, RI , USA ; Current affiliation: College of the Environment and Life Sciences, University of Rhode Island , Kingston, RI , USA.

ABSTRACT
Across the globe, discussions centered on the value of nature drive many conservation and restoration decisions. As a result, justification for management activities increasingly asks for two lines of evidence: (1) biological proof of augmented ecosystem function or service, and (2) monetary valuation of these services. For oyster reefs, which have seen significant global declines and increasing restoration work, the need to provide both biological and monetary evidence of reef services on a local-level has become more critical in a time of declining resources. Here, we quantified species biomass and potential commercial value of nekton collected from restored oyster (Crassostrea virginica) reefs in coastal Louisiana over a 3-year period, providing multiple snapshots of biomass support over time. Overall, and with little change over time, fish and invertebrate biomass is 212% greater at restored oyster reefs than mud-bottom, or 0.12 kg m(-2). The additional biomass of commercial species is equivalent to an increase of local fisheries value by 226%, or $0.09 m(-2). Understanding the ecosystem value of restoration projects, and how they interact with regional management priorities, is critical to inform local decision-making and provide testable predictions. Quantitative estimates of potential commercial fisheries enhancement by oyster reef restoration such as this one can be used directly by local managers to determine the expected return on investment.

No MeSH data available.