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Cardiac perfusion imaging using hyperpolarized (13)C urea using flow sensitizing gradients.

Lau AZ, Miller JJ, Robson MD, Tyler DJ - Magn Reson Med (2015)

Bottom Line: A flow-sensitizing bipolar gradient was optimized to reduce the bright signal within the cardiac chambers, enabling improved contrast of the agent within the tissue capillary bed.This probe of myocardial perfusion is expected to enable new hyperpolarized (13)C studies in which the cardiac metabolism/perfusion mismatch can be identified.Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Radcliffe Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, United Kingdom.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

In vivo 1H images obtained using the flow sensitizing gradient using either Cartesian gradient echo readout (top row) or golden angle spiral readout (bottom row). The flow sensitizing gradient (m1 = 78 mT·ms2/m, VENC = 15 cm/s) dephases signal from within the lumen, while stationary anatomy is preserved. A cine image is shown as an anatomical reference. The images are cropped to a 25 × 25 mm2 FOV, and the scale bar indicates 10 mm.
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Figure 3: In vivo 1H images obtained using the flow sensitizing gradient using either Cartesian gradient echo readout (top row) or golden angle spiral readout (bottom row). The flow sensitizing gradient (m1 = 78 mT·ms2/m, VENC = 15 cm/s) dephases signal from within the lumen, while stationary anatomy is preserved. A cine image is shown as an anatomical reference. The images are cropped to a 25 × 25 mm2 FOV, and the scale bar indicates 10 mm.

Mentions: Proton calibration scans were performed to determine the required bipolar gradient amplitude necessary to spoil flowing 13C signal from within the cardiac chambers. Figure 3 shows the results of the calibration scan using both Cartesian gradient echo and non-Cartesian spiral readouts. The required gradient amplitude for typical flow rates within the rat heart was determined to be 40 mT/m (m1 = 78 mT·ms2/m, VENC = 15 cm/s). At this amplitude, the signal from within the lumen was dephased, while signal from stationary spins was preserved. The anatomical cine reference demonstrates that the non–flow-suppressed signal comes from the tissue.


Cardiac perfusion imaging using hyperpolarized (13)C urea using flow sensitizing gradients.

Lau AZ, Miller JJ, Robson MD, Tyler DJ - Magn Reson Med (2015)

In vivo 1H images obtained using the flow sensitizing gradient using either Cartesian gradient echo readout (top row) or golden angle spiral readout (bottom row). The flow sensitizing gradient (m1 = 78 mT·ms2/m, VENC = 15 cm/s) dephases signal from within the lumen, while stationary anatomy is preserved. A cine image is shown as an anatomical reference. The images are cropped to a 25 × 25 mm2 FOV, and the scale bar indicates 10 mm.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4556069&req=5

Figure 3: In vivo 1H images obtained using the flow sensitizing gradient using either Cartesian gradient echo readout (top row) or golden angle spiral readout (bottom row). The flow sensitizing gradient (m1 = 78 mT·ms2/m, VENC = 15 cm/s) dephases signal from within the lumen, while stationary anatomy is preserved. A cine image is shown as an anatomical reference. The images are cropped to a 25 × 25 mm2 FOV, and the scale bar indicates 10 mm.
Mentions: Proton calibration scans were performed to determine the required bipolar gradient amplitude necessary to spoil flowing 13C signal from within the cardiac chambers. Figure 3 shows the results of the calibration scan using both Cartesian gradient echo and non-Cartesian spiral readouts. The required gradient amplitude for typical flow rates within the rat heart was determined to be 40 mT/m (m1 = 78 mT·ms2/m, VENC = 15 cm/s). At this amplitude, the signal from within the lumen was dephased, while signal from stationary spins was preserved. The anatomical cine reference demonstrates that the non–flow-suppressed signal comes from the tissue.

Bottom Line: A flow-sensitizing bipolar gradient was optimized to reduce the bright signal within the cardiac chambers, enabling improved contrast of the agent within the tissue capillary bed.This probe of myocardial perfusion is expected to enable new hyperpolarized (13)C studies in which the cardiac metabolism/perfusion mismatch can be identified.Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Radcliffe Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, United Kingdom.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus