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Repair of segmental bone defects in the maxilla by transport disc distraction osteogenesis: Clinical experience with a new device.

Boonzaier J, Vicatos G, Hendricks R - Ann Maxillofac Surg (2015 Jan-Jun)

Bottom Line: Bone formed in this way closely mimics the parent bone in form and internal structure, producing a superior anatomical, functional and cosmetic result.Fujioka et al. reported in 2012 that "no bone transporter corresponding to the (large) size of the oro-antral fistula is marketed.The authors report the successful treatment of 4 cases involving alveolar defects of between 25 mm and 80 mm in length.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch, Cape Town, 7700, South Africa.

ABSTRACT
The bones of the maxillary complex are vital for normal oro-nasal function and facial cosmetics. Maxillary tumor excision results in large defects that commonly include segments of the alveolar and palatine processes, compromising eating, speech and facial appearance. Unlike the conventional approach to maxillary defect repair by vascularized bone grafting, transport disc distraction osteogenesis (TDDO) stimulates new bone by separating the healing callus, and stimulates growth of surrounding soft tissues as well. Bone formed in this way closely mimics the parent bone in form and internal structure, producing a superior anatomical, functional and cosmetic result. Historically, TDDO has been successfully used to close small horizontal cleft defects in the maxilla, not exceeding 25 mm. Fujioka et al. reported in 2012 that "no bone transporter corresponding to the (large) size of the oro-antral fistula is marketed. The authors report the successful treatment of 4 cases involving alveolar defects of between 25 mm and 80 mm in length.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The various components of the transport disc distraction osteogenesis device (University of Cape Town patent number PCT/IB2012/056664)
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Figure 1: The various components of the transport disc distraction osteogenesis device (University of Cape Town patent number PCT/IB2012/056664)

Mentions: The current version of the device operates on the principle of a worm screw engaged with a toothed rack [Figures 1 and 2]. The worm screw is housed within a mobile component, the bone transport carriage, which translates along the trajectory rail. By rotating the worm screw (activation), the bone transport carriage propels along the toothed rack by a distance of 1 mm per revolution. The trajectory rail can be customized to mimic the natural contours of the maxillary alveolar process by bending and trimming. The current device caters for a distraction length of up to 100 mm and a minimum bend radius of 25 mm. Mini bone screws are used to secure the BTD in a mesh-like cradle.


Repair of segmental bone defects in the maxilla by transport disc distraction osteogenesis: Clinical experience with a new device.

Boonzaier J, Vicatos G, Hendricks R - Ann Maxillofac Surg (2015 Jan-Jun)

The various components of the transport disc distraction osteogenesis device (University of Cape Town patent number PCT/IB2012/056664)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555956&req=5

Figure 1: The various components of the transport disc distraction osteogenesis device (University of Cape Town patent number PCT/IB2012/056664)
Mentions: The current version of the device operates on the principle of a worm screw engaged with a toothed rack [Figures 1 and 2]. The worm screw is housed within a mobile component, the bone transport carriage, which translates along the trajectory rail. By rotating the worm screw (activation), the bone transport carriage propels along the toothed rack by a distance of 1 mm per revolution. The trajectory rail can be customized to mimic the natural contours of the maxillary alveolar process by bending and trimming. The current device caters for a distraction length of up to 100 mm and a minimum bend radius of 25 mm. Mini bone screws are used to secure the BTD in a mesh-like cradle.

Bottom Line: Bone formed in this way closely mimics the parent bone in form and internal structure, producing a superior anatomical, functional and cosmetic result.Fujioka et al. reported in 2012 that "no bone transporter corresponding to the (large) size of the oro-antral fistula is marketed.The authors report the successful treatment of 4 cases involving alveolar defects of between 25 mm and 80 mm in length.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch, Cape Town, 7700, South Africa.

ABSTRACT
The bones of the maxillary complex are vital for normal oro-nasal function and facial cosmetics. Maxillary tumor excision results in large defects that commonly include segments of the alveolar and palatine processes, compromising eating, speech and facial appearance. Unlike the conventional approach to maxillary defect repair by vascularized bone grafting, transport disc distraction osteogenesis (TDDO) stimulates new bone by separating the healing callus, and stimulates growth of surrounding soft tissues as well. Bone formed in this way closely mimics the parent bone in form and internal structure, producing a superior anatomical, functional and cosmetic result. Historically, TDDO has been successfully used to close small horizontal cleft defects in the maxilla, not exceeding 25 mm. Fujioka et al. reported in 2012 that "no bone transporter corresponding to the (large) size of the oro-antral fistula is marketed. The authors report the successful treatment of 4 cases involving alveolar defects of between 25 mm and 80 mm in length.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus