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Cementoblastoma of posterior maxilla involving the maxillary sinus.

Dadhich AS, Nilesh K - Ann Maxillofac Surg (2015 Jan-Jun)

Bottom Line: It usually occurs in the posterior mandible and is associated with roots of a mandibular first molar or second premolar.This paper presents a rare case of cementoblastoma in the maxillary posterior region involving the maxillary sinus, in a young female patient.The clinical, radiological, and histopathological features of the lesion are discussed along with a review of previously reported cases in the literature.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Rural Dental College and Hospital, Loni, Maharashtra, India.

ABSTRACT
Cementoblastoma is a rare neoplasm, representing <1% of all odontogenic tumors. It usually occurs in the posterior mandible and is associated with roots of a mandibular first molar or second premolar. This paper presents a rare case of cementoblastoma in the maxillary posterior region involving the maxillary sinus, in a young female patient. The clinical, radiological, and histopathological features of the lesion are discussed along with a review of previously reported cases in the literature.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a-d) Three-dimensional radiographic evaluation of the lesion
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Figure 2: (a-d) Three-dimensional radiographic evaluation of the lesion

Mentions: A reformatted panoramic image [Figure 2a] from a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan showed a large amorphous hyperdense mass in left maxillary molar region. The lesion appeared to be extending beyond the apices of the molars, with the superior extent of the lesion not clear on this view. However, the cross-sectional image at the level of maxillary first molar [Figure 2b] showed a well-defined, hyperdense mass originating from the palatal root that measured about 19 mm in greatest dimension. The density of the mass appeared to be similar to that of the dentino-cemental complex. The superior margin of the lesion seemed to have pushed the floor of the maxillary sinus superiorly. The tangential (parasagittal) section [Figure 2c] showed the lesion to extend from the distal of premolar to the second molar region, superimposing over the maxillary sinus. This view showed a slight variation in the density of the lesion (heterogeneous appearance). The axial section [Figure 2d] at the level apical to the furcation area of first molar showed the mass to be originating from the palatal roots and appeared to have breached the palatal cortex. All the above features were suggestive of a lesion originating from the root and made up of odontogenic tissues. Based on these radiographic images a differential diagnosis of cementoblastoma, cemento-ossifying fibroma, hypercementosis and focal sclerosing osteomyelitis was considered.


Cementoblastoma of posterior maxilla involving the maxillary sinus.

Dadhich AS, Nilesh K - Ann Maxillofac Surg (2015 Jan-Jun)

(a-d) Three-dimensional radiographic evaluation of the lesion
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555938&req=5

Figure 2: (a-d) Three-dimensional radiographic evaluation of the lesion
Mentions: A reformatted panoramic image [Figure 2a] from a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan showed a large amorphous hyperdense mass in left maxillary molar region. The lesion appeared to be extending beyond the apices of the molars, with the superior extent of the lesion not clear on this view. However, the cross-sectional image at the level of maxillary first molar [Figure 2b] showed a well-defined, hyperdense mass originating from the palatal root that measured about 19 mm in greatest dimension. The density of the mass appeared to be similar to that of the dentino-cemental complex. The superior margin of the lesion seemed to have pushed the floor of the maxillary sinus superiorly. The tangential (parasagittal) section [Figure 2c] showed the lesion to extend from the distal of premolar to the second molar region, superimposing over the maxillary sinus. This view showed a slight variation in the density of the lesion (heterogeneous appearance). The axial section [Figure 2d] at the level apical to the furcation area of first molar showed the mass to be originating from the palatal roots and appeared to have breached the palatal cortex. All the above features were suggestive of a lesion originating from the root and made up of odontogenic tissues. Based on these radiographic images a differential diagnosis of cementoblastoma, cemento-ossifying fibroma, hypercementosis and focal sclerosing osteomyelitis was considered.

Bottom Line: It usually occurs in the posterior mandible and is associated with roots of a mandibular first molar or second premolar.This paper presents a rare case of cementoblastoma in the maxillary posterior region involving the maxillary sinus, in a young female patient.The clinical, radiological, and histopathological features of the lesion are discussed along with a review of previously reported cases in the literature.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Rural Dental College and Hospital, Loni, Maharashtra, India.

ABSTRACT
Cementoblastoma is a rare neoplasm, representing <1% of all odontogenic tumors. It usually occurs in the posterior mandible and is associated with roots of a mandibular first molar or second premolar. This paper presents a rare case of cementoblastoma in the maxillary posterior region involving the maxillary sinus, in a young female patient. The clinical, radiological, and histopathological features of the lesion are discussed along with a review of previously reported cases in the literature.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus