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Pattern of co-infection by enteric pathogenic parasites among HIV sero-positive individuals in a Tertiary Care Hospital, Mumbai, India.

Ahmed NH, Chowdhary A - Indian J Sex Transm Dis (2015 Jan-Jun)

Bottom Line: Such clinical scenario warrants an analysis of intestinal parasites, which are important opportunistic pathogens in PLHA.The routine light microscopic examination was carried out to determine the infection and CD4+ T-Lymphocyte count was estimated using flow cytometry.Most common opportunistic enteric parasite was Isospora belli (11.5%); others were Entamoeba histolytica (4.7%), Cryptosporidium sp. (3.6%), Strongyloides stercoralis (3.1%), Giardia intestinalis (3.1%) and Cyclospora cayatanenesis (1.6%).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Laboratory Medicine, Delhi State Cancer Institute, New Delhi, India.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: One of the major medical concerns in people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHA) is management of diarrhea that can lead to severe morbidity and mortality. Such clinical scenario warrants an analysis of intestinal parasites, which are important opportunistic pathogens in PLHA. Owing to the scarcity of recent pattern of intestinal opportunistic infections from this region, the study was designed to determine the opportunistic parasites causing diarrhea in PLHA; and to find out whether there is any significant difference in the enteric parasitic pathogens in patients with different immunological status and in those on highly active anti retro-viral therapy (HAART).

Materials and methods: Analysis of the spectrum of intestinal parasites was carried out with 192 subjects in two groups (142 HIV sero-positive patients having diarrhea and 50 HIV sero-negative patients having diarrhea). The routine light microscopic examination was carried out to determine the infection and CD4+ T-Lymphocyte count was estimated using flow cytometry.

Results: Enteric parasites were detected in 35.9% of HIV sero-positive patients having diarrhea and 18% of HIV sero-negative patients having diarrhea. Most common opportunistic enteric parasite was Isospora belli (11.5%); others were Entamoeba histolytica (4.7%), Cryptosporidium sp. (3.6%), Strongyloides stercoralis (3.1%), Giardia intestinalis (3.1%) and Cyclospora cayatanenesis (1.6%). Opportunistic enteric parasites were detected in significantly low numbers in patients with CD4+ T-Lymphocyte counts >500 cells/ml; and in those taking HAART.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Age and type of enteric parasitic infection in the study population. (a) Number of individuals in different age groups. Maximum patients belonged to age range 31–40 years in HIV sero-positive patients (group-1, n = 142), while in HIV sero-negative patients (group-2, n = 50)-maximum patients were from age range 21–30 years. (b) Type of enteric parasite causing infection in the two study groups. Group-1 showed significantly higher number of infected patients with P < 0.05
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Figure 1: Age and type of enteric parasitic infection in the study population. (a) Number of individuals in different age groups. Maximum patients belonged to age range 31–40 years in HIV sero-positive patients (group-1, n = 142), while in HIV sero-negative patients (group-2, n = 50)-maximum patients were from age range 21–30 years. (b) Type of enteric parasite causing infection in the two study groups. Group-1 showed significantly higher number of infected patients with P < 0.05

Mentions: In the study population, male gender was predominant with 72% representatives, and only 28% were females. Maximum number of the patients were from age group 31–40 years in group 1 (HIV sero-positive patients having diarrhea), whereas in group 2 (HIV sero-negative patients having diarrhea) maximum patients were having age ≤20 years [Figure 1a].


Pattern of co-infection by enteric pathogenic parasites among HIV sero-positive individuals in a Tertiary Care Hospital, Mumbai, India.

Ahmed NH, Chowdhary A - Indian J Sex Transm Dis (2015 Jan-Jun)

Age and type of enteric parasitic infection in the study population. (a) Number of individuals in different age groups. Maximum patients belonged to age range 31–40 years in HIV sero-positive patients (group-1, n = 142), while in HIV sero-negative patients (group-2, n = 50)-maximum patients were from age range 21–30 years. (b) Type of enteric parasite causing infection in the two study groups. Group-1 showed significantly higher number of infected patients with P < 0.05
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555898&req=5

Figure 1: Age and type of enteric parasitic infection in the study population. (a) Number of individuals in different age groups. Maximum patients belonged to age range 31–40 years in HIV sero-positive patients (group-1, n = 142), while in HIV sero-negative patients (group-2, n = 50)-maximum patients were from age range 21–30 years. (b) Type of enteric parasite causing infection in the two study groups. Group-1 showed significantly higher number of infected patients with P < 0.05
Mentions: In the study population, male gender was predominant with 72% representatives, and only 28% were females. Maximum number of the patients were from age group 31–40 years in group 1 (HIV sero-positive patients having diarrhea), whereas in group 2 (HIV sero-negative patients having diarrhea) maximum patients were having age ≤20 years [Figure 1a].

Bottom Line: Such clinical scenario warrants an analysis of intestinal parasites, which are important opportunistic pathogens in PLHA.The routine light microscopic examination was carried out to determine the infection and CD4+ T-Lymphocyte count was estimated using flow cytometry.Most common opportunistic enteric parasite was Isospora belli (11.5%); others were Entamoeba histolytica (4.7%), Cryptosporidium sp. (3.6%), Strongyloides stercoralis (3.1%), Giardia intestinalis (3.1%) and Cyclospora cayatanenesis (1.6%).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Laboratory Medicine, Delhi State Cancer Institute, New Delhi, India.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: One of the major medical concerns in people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHA) is management of diarrhea that can lead to severe morbidity and mortality. Such clinical scenario warrants an analysis of intestinal parasites, which are important opportunistic pathogens in PLHA. Owing to the scarcity of recent pattern of intestinal opportunistic infections from this region, the study was designed to determine the opportunistic parasites causing diarrhea in PLHA; and to find out whether there is any significant difference in the enteric parasitic pathogens in patients with different immunological status and in those on highly active anti retro-viral therapy (HAART).

Materials and methods: Analysis of the spectrum of intestinal parasites was carried out with 192 subjects in two groups (142 HIV sero-positive patients having diarrhea and 50 HIV sero-negative patients having diarrhea). The routine light microscopic examination was carried out to determine the infection and CD4+ T-Lymphocyte count was estimated using flow cytometry.

Results: Enteric parasites were detected in 35.9% of HIV sero-positive patients having diarrhea and 18% of HIV sero-negative patients having diarrhea. Most common opportunistic enteric parasite was Isospora belli (11.5%); others were Entamoeba histolytica (4.7%), Cryptosporidium sp. (3.6%), Strongyloides stercoralis (3.1%), Giardia intestinalis (3.1%) and Cyclospora cayatanenesis (1.6%). Opportunistic enteric parasites were detected in significantly low numbers in patients with CD4+ T-Lymphocyte counts >500 cells/ml; and in those taking HAART.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus