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A systematic review on the prevalence and utilization of health care services for reproductive tract infections/sexually transmitted infections: Evidence from India.

Nagarkar A, Mhaskar P - Indian J Sex Transm Dis (2015 Jan-Jun)

Bottom Line: A structured search strategy was used to identify relevant articles, published during years 2000-2012.Forty-one full-text papers discussing prevalence and treatment utilization pattern were included as per PRISMA guidelines.Stigma, embarrassment, illiteracy, lack of privacy, cost of care found to limit the use of services, but discussion on pathways of nonutilization remains unclear.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Interdisciplinary School of Health Sciences, University of Pune, Ganeshkhind, Pune, Maharashtra, India.

ABSTRACT
Several studies have reported prevalence rate of reproductive tract infections (RTIs) but very few studies have described health seeking behavior of patients. This paper critically looks at and summarizes the available evidence, systematically. A structured search strategy was used to identify relevant articles, published during years 2000-2012. Forty-one full-text papers discussing prevalence and treatment utilization pattern were included as per PRISMA guidelines. Papers examining prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases used biochemical methods and standard protocol for diagnosis while studies on RTIs used different methods for diagnosis. The prevalence of RTIs has not changed much over the years and found to vary from 11% to 72% in the community-based studies. Stigma, embarrassment, illiteracy, lack of privacy, cost of care found to limit the use of services, but discussion on pathways of nonutilization remains unclear. Lack of methodological rigor, statistical power, specificity in case definitions as well as too little discussion on the limitation of selected method of diagnosis and reliance on observational evidence hampered the quality of studies on RTIs. Raising awareness among women regarding symptoms of RTIs and sexually transmitted infections and also about appropriate treatment has remained largely a neglected area and, therefore, we observed absence of health system studies in this area.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flow chart of the studies included in the systematic review
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Figure 1: Flow chart of the studies included in the systematic review

Mentions: Studies reporting prevalence of RTIs and STIs and utilization of healthcare services for treating these conditions were included in this literature-based analysis. Search for the articles published from 2000 up-to-the mid of 2012 was conducted using PubMed, Medline, and Google scholar. Following keywords were used; prevalence of RTIs/STIs, health service utilization and RTIs/STIs, treatment and RTIs/STIs, health seeking behavior and RTIs/STIs. An additional step was taken to visit websites of selected journals (only those journals which are indexed in the selected repositories) and search relevant articles for making review more exhaustive. Figure 1 describes the process of selection of papers. Forty-one eligible papers were analyzed after obtaining their full text, carefully. Results were categorized based on the objectives of the review and presented in a tabular format.


A systematic review on the prevalence and utilization of health care services for reproductive tract infections/sexually transmitted infections: Evidence from India.

Nagarkar A, Mhaskar P - Indian J Sex Transm Dis (2015 Jan-Jun)

Flow chart of the studies included in the systematic review
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555893&req=5

Figure 1: Flow chart of the studies included in the systematic review
Mentions: Studies reporting prevalence of RTIs and STIs and utilization of healthcare services for treating these conditions were included in this literature-based analysis. Search for the articles published from 2000 up-to-the mid of 2012 was conducted using PubMed, Medline, and Google scholar. Following keywords were used; prevalence of RTIs/STIs, health service utilization and RTIs/STIs, treatment and RTIs/STIs, health seeking behavior and RTIs/STIs. An additional step was taken to visit websites of selected journals (only those journals which are indexed in the selected repositories) and search relevant articles for making review more exhaustive. Figure 1 describes the process of selection of papers. Forty-one eligible papers were analyzed after obtaining their full text, carefully. Results were categorized based on the objectives of the review and presented in a tabular format.

Bottom Line: A structured search strategy was used to identify relevant articles, published during years 2000-2012.Forty-one full-text papers discussing prevalence and treatment utilization pattern were included as per PRISMA guidelines.Stigma, embarrassment, illiteracy, lack of privacy, cost of care found to limit the use of services, but discussion on pathways of nonutilization remains unclear.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Interdisciplinary School of Health Sciences, University of Pune, Ganeshkhind, Pune, Maharashtra, India.

ABSTRACT
Several studies have reported prevalence rate of reproductive tract infections (RTIs) but very few studies have described health seeking behavior of patients. This paper critically looks at and summarizes the available evidence, systematically. A structured search strategy was used to identify relevant articles, published during years 2000-2012. Forty-one full-text papers discussing prevalence and treatment utilization pattern were included as per PRISMA guidelines. Papers examining prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases used biochemical methods and standard protocol for diagnosis while studies on RTIs used different methods for diagnosis. The prevalence of RTIs has not changed much over the years and found to vary from 11% to 72% in the community-based studies. Stigma, embarrassment, illiteracy, lack of privacy, cost of care found to limit the use of services, but discussion on pathways of nonutilization remains unclear. Lack of methodological rigor, statistical power, specificity in case definitions as well as too little discussion on the limitation of selected method of diagnosis and reliance on observational evidence hampered the quality of studies on RTIs. Raising awareness among women regarding symptoms of RTIs and sexually transmitted infections and also about appropriate treatment has remained largely a neglected area and, therefore, we observed absence of health system studies in this area.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus