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Light-emitting diode street lights reduce last-ditch evasive manoeuvres by moths to bat echolocation calls.

Wakefield A, Stone EL, Jones G, Harris S - R Soc Open Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: The light-emitting diode (LED) street light market is expanding globally, and it is important to understand how LED lights affect wildlife populations.We compared evasive flight responses of moths to bat echolocation calls experimentally under LED-lit and -unlit conditions.LED street lights reduce the anti-predator behaviour of moths, shifting the balance in favour of their predators, aerial hawking bats.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Biological Sciences, Life Sciences Building , University of Bristol , 24 Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TQ, UK.

ABSTRACT
The light-emitting diode (LED) street light market is expanding globally, and it is important to understand how LED lights affect wildlife populations. We compared evasive flight responses of moths to bat echolocation calls experimentally under LED-lit and -unlit conditions. Significantly, fewer moths performed 'powerdive' flight manoeuvres in response to bat calls (feeding buzz sequences from Nyctalus spp.) under an LED street light than in the dark. LED street lights reduce the anti-predator behaviour of moths, shifting the balance in favour of their predators, aerial hawking bats.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mosaic plot illustrating the overall proportion of moth flight responses in relation to treatment type. Column widths are proportional to sample sizes.
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RSOS150291F3: Mosaic plot illustrating the overall proportion of moth flight responses in relation to treatment type. Column widths are proportional to sample sizes.

Mentions: Data from 94 moths (control n=14; bat n=15; LED n=27; LED-bat n=38) from 16 nights at four different sites were included. For each model, data from 39 moths were omitted from analyses because they were either flying more than 5 m from the street light column; flying less than 3 m from the ultrasonic speaker; flying greater than 5 m from the ultrasonic speaker; or because echolocation calls from wild bats were heard clearly on the bat detector during treatments. A further 18 recordings were excluded as these moths' responses were placed in category (iv) (behaviour unclear). The number of powerdives was significantly lower under ‘LED-bat’ treatments than ‘bat’ treatments (s.e.=0.683, z=−2.393, p=0.012) but significantly higher than under ‘LED’ treatments (s.e.=1.136, z=1.987, p=0.047). Only 24% of moths performed powerdives during ‘LED-bat’ treatments compared with 60% during ‘bat’ treatments (figure 3). The proportion of powerdives was significantly higher for ‘bat’ treatments than both bat-free treatments (‘control’, s.e.=1.198, z=2.405, p=0.016; ‘LED’, s.e.=1.198, z=3.249, p=0.001) and was not significantly different between the two bat-free treatments (s.e.=1.328, z=−1.168, p=0.243).Figure 3.


Light-emitting diode street lights reduce last-ditch evasive manoeuvres by moths to bat echolocation calls.

Wakefield A, Stone EL, Jones G, Harris S - R Soc Open Sci (2015)

Mosaic plot illustrating the overall proportion of moth flight responses in relation to treatment type. Column widths are proportional to sample sizes.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555863&req=5

RSOS150291F3: Mosaic plot illustrating the overall proportion of moth flight responses in relation to treatment type. Column widths are proportional to sample sizes.
Mentions: Data from 94 moths (control n=14; bat n=15; LED n=27; LED-bat n=38) from 16 nights at four different sites were included. For each model, data from 39 moths were omitted from analyses because they were either flying more than 5 m from the street light column; flying less than 3 m from the ultrasonic speaker; flying greater than 5 m from the ultrasonic speaker; or because echolocation calls from wild bats were heard clearly on the bat detector during treatments. A further 18 recordings were excluded as these moths' responses were placed in category (iv) (behaviour unclear). The number of powerdives was significantly lower under ‘LED-bat’ treatments than ‘bat’ treatments (s.e.=0.683, z=−2.393, p=0.012) but significantly higher than under ‘LED’ treatments (s.e.=1.136, z=1.987, p=0.047). Only 24% of moths performed powerdives during ‘LED-bat’ treatments compared with 60% during ‘bat’ treatments (figure 3). The proportion of powerdives was significantly higher for ‘bat’ treatments than both bat-free treatments (‘control’, s.e.=1.198, z=2.405, p=0.016; ‘LED’, s.e.=1.198, z=3.249, p=0.001) and was not significantly different between the two bat-free treatments (s.e.=1.328, z=−1.168, p=0.243).Figure 3.

Bottom Line: The light-emitting diode (LED) street light market is expanding globally, and it is important to understand how LED lights affect wildlife populations.We compared evasive flight responses of moths to bat echolocation calls experimentally under LED-lit and -unlit conditions.LED street lights reduce the anti-predator behaviour of moths, shifting the balance in favour of their predators, aerial hawking bats.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Biological Sciences, Life Sciences Building , University of Bristol , 24 Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TQ, UK.

ABSTRACT
The light-emitting diode (LED) street light market is expanding globally, and it is important to understand how LED lights affect wildlife populations. We compared evasive flight responses of moths to bat echolocation calls experimentally under LED-lit and -unlit conditions. Significantly, fewer moths performed 'powerdive' flight manoeuvres in response to bat calls (feeding buzz sequences from Nyctalus spp.) under an LED street light than in the dark. LED street lights reduce the anti-predator behaviour of moths, shifting the balance in favour of their predators, aerial hawking bats.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus