Limits...
Light-emitting diode street lights reduce last-ditch evasive manoeuvres by moths to bat echolocation calls.

Wakefield A, Stone EL, Jones G, Harris S - R Soc Open Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: The light-emitting diode (LED) street light market is expanding globally, and it is important to understand how LED lights affect wildlife populations.We compared evasive flight responses of moths to bat echolocation calls experimentally under LED-lit and -unlit conditions.LED street lights reduce the anti-predator behaviour of moths, shifting the balance in favour of their predators, aerial hawking bats.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Biological Sciences, Life Sciences Building , University of Bristol , 24 Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TQ, UK.

ABSTRACT
The light-emitting diode (LED) street light market is expanding globally, and it is important to understand how LED lights affect wildlife populations. We compared evasive flight responses of moths to bat echolocation calls experimentally under LED-lit and -unlit conditions. Significantly, fewer moths performed 'powerdive' flight manoeuvres in response to bat calls (feeding buzz sequences from Nyctalus spp.) under an LED street light than in the dark. LED street lights reduce the anti-predator behaviour of moths, shifting the balance in favour of their predators, aerial hawking bats.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Spectral distribution of the Philips Mini Iridium LED street light.
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RSOS150291F1: Spectral distribution of the Philips Mini Iridium LED street light.

Mentions: In Britain, many moth species have suffered major population declines [7]. Light pollution is a potential driver behind these declines [8]; one-third of flying insects attracted to artificial lights die [9]. Predation of insects around artificial lights by bats is also well documented [10–13]. Although many insects have tympanic ears to detect predatory bats [14], ultraviolet (UV)-emitting, broad-spectrum MV street lights reduce a moth's likelihood of responding to bat echolocation calls [12,15] and increase the risk of predation [16]. We used field experiments to test the hypothesis that UV-absent, broad-spectrum LED street lights (figure 1) also impair the ability of moths to elicit evasive ‘powerdive’ flight behaviours in response to the echolocation calls of foraging bats.Figure 1.


Light-emitting diode street lights reduce last-ditch evasive manoeuvres by moths to bat echolocation calls.

Wakefield A, Stone EL, Jones G, Harris S - R Soc Open Sci (2015)

Spectral distribution of the Philips Mini Iridium LED street light.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555863&req=5

RSOS150291F1: Spectral distribution of the Philips Mini Iridium LED street light.
Mentions: In Britain, many moth species have suffered major population declines [7]. Light pollution is a potential driver behind these declines [8]; one-third of flying insects attracted to artificial lights die [9]. Predation of insects around artificial lights by bats is also well documented [10–13]. Although many insects have tympanic ears to detect predatory bats [14], ultraviolet (UV)-emitting, broad-spectrum MV street lights reduce a moth's likelihood of responding to bat echolocation calls [12,15] and increase the risk of predation [16]. We used field experiments to test the hypothesis that UV-absent, broad-spectrum LED street lights (figure 1) also impair the ability of moths to elicit evasive ‘powerdive’ flight behaviours in response to the echolocation calls of foraging bats.Figure 1.

Bottom Line: The light-emitting diode (LED) street light market is expanding globally, and it is important to understand how LED lights affect wildlife populations.We compared evasive flight responses of moths to bat echolocation calls experimentally under LED-lit and -unlit conditions.LED street lights reduce the anti-predator behaviour of moths, shifting the balance in favour of their predators, aerial hawking bats.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Biological Sciences, Life Sciences Building , University of Bristol , 24 Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TQ, UK.

ABSTRACT
The light-emitting diode (LED) street light market is expanding globally, and it is important to understand how LED lights affect wildlife populations. We compared evasive flight responses of moths to bat echolocation calls experimentally under LED-lit and -unlit conditions. Significantly, fewer moths performed 'powerdive' flight manoeuvres in response to bat calls (feeding buzz sequences from Nyctalus spp.) under an LED street light than in the dark. LED street lights reduce the anti-predator behaviour of moths, shifting the balance in favour of their predators, aerial hawking bats.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus