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Peripheral giant cell granuloma: This enormity is a rarity.

Rodrigues SV, Mitra DK, Pawar SD, Vijayakar HN - J Indian Soc Periodontol (2015 Jul-Aug)

Bottom Line: Ulcerations of the margin are occasionally seen.It normally presents as a purplish-red nodule consisting of multinucleated giant cells in the background of mononuclear stromal cells and extravasated red blood cells.This case report describes the unusual appearance of a PGCG extending from left maxillary interdental gingiva to palatal area in 32-year-old female patient.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Periodontology, Terna Dental College, Navi Mumbai, Maharashtra, India.

ABSTRACT
Peripheral giant cell granuloma (PGCG) is an infrequent exophytic lesion of the oral cavity, also known as giant cell epulis, osteoclastoma, giant cell reparative granuloma, or giant cell hyperplasia. Lesions vary in appearance from smooth, regularly outlined masses to irregularly shaped, multilobulated protuberances with surface indentations. Ulcerations of the margin are occasionally seen. The lesions are painless, vary in size, and may cover several teeth. It normally presents as a purplish-red nodule consisting of multinucleated giant cells in the background of mononuclear stromal cells and extravasated red blood cells. This case report describes the unusual appearance of a PGCG extending from left maxillary interdental gingiva to palatal area in 32-year-old female patient.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Orthopantomogram showing interdental bone loss between second premolar and first molar
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Figure 5: Orthopantomogram showing interdental bone loss between second premolar and first molar

Mentions: Her complete blood count revealed normal results. Superficial erosion of the alveolar crest in relation to the growth was seen in periapical radiograph [Figure 3], such superficial erosions of alveolar bone are usually observed in cases of PGCG.[4] In occlusal radiographs, no significant bone loss was found [Figure 4]. Orthopantomogram of patient showed interdental bone loss with second premolar and first molar [Figure 5]. Cone beam computed tomography revealed soft tissue growth originating from left maxilla measuring 23.28 mm × 16.57 mm in greatest dimensions [Figure 6a and b].


Peripheral giant cell granuloma: This enormity is a rarity.

Rodrigues SV, Mitra DK, Pawar SD, Vijayakar HN - J Indian Soc Periodontol (2015 Jul-Aug)

Orthopantomogram showing interdental bone loss between second premolar and first molar
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555810&req=5

Figure 5: Orthopantomogram showing interdental bone loss between second premolar and first molar
Mentions: Her complete blood count revealed normal results. Superficial erosion of the alveolar crest in relation to the growth was seen in periapical radiograph [Figure 3], such superficial erosions of alveolar bone are usually observed in cases of PGCG.[4] In occlusal radiographs, no significant bone loss was found [Figure 4]. Orthopantomogram of patient showed interdental bone loss with second premolar and first molar [Figure 5]. Cone beam computed tomography revealed soft tissue growth originating from left maxilla measuring 23.28 mm × 16.57 mm in greatest dimensions [Figure 6a and b].

Bottom Line: Ulcerations of the margin are occasionally seen.It normally presents as a purplish-red nodule consisting of multinucleated giant cells in the background of mononuclear stromal cells and extravasated red blood cells.This case report describes the unusual appearance of a PGCG extending from left maxillary interdental gingiva to palatal area in 32-year-old female patient.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Periodontology, Terna Dental College, Navi Mumbai, Maharashtra, India.

ABSTRACT
Peripheral giant cell granuloma (PGCG) is an infrequent exophytic lesion of the oral cavity, also known as giant cell epulis, osteoclastoma, giant cell reparative granuloma, or giant cell hyperplasia. Lesions vary in appearance from smooth, regularly outlined masses to irregularly shaped, multilobulated protuberances with surface indentations. Ulcerations of the margin are occasionally seen. The lesions are painless, vary in size, and may cover several teeth. It normally presents as a purplish-red nodule consisting of multinucleated giant cells in the background of mononuclear stromal cells and extravasated red blood cells. This case report describes the unusual appearance of a PGCG extending from left maxillary interdental gingiva to palatal area in 32-year-old female patient.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus