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Accuracy of cone-beam computerized tomography in determining the thickness of palatal masticatory mucosa.

Gupta P, Jan SM, Behal R, Mir RA, Shafi M - J Indian Soc Periodontol (2015 Jul-Aug)

Bottom Line: Statistical analysis determined that there was no significant difference between the two methods.Moreover, the tissue thickness was shown to increase as the distance from the gingival margin increased, and the tissue over the premolars was thicker than the other teeth.Cone-beam computerized tomography can be used as a noninvasive method to accurately and consistently determine the soft tissue thickness of the palatal masticatory mucosa with minimal bias at different locations on the palate.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Periodontics and Oral Implantology, Government Dental College, Srinagar, Jammu and Kashmir, India.

ABSTRACT

Background: The palatal masticatory mucosa is the main donor area of soft tissue and connective tissue grafts used for increasing the keratinized mucosa around teeth and implants, covering exposed roots and increasing localized alveolar ridge thickness. The aim of this study was to compare the thickness of the palatal masticatory mucosa as determined on a cone-beam computerized tomography scan versus thickness determined via bone-sounding.

Materials and methods: A total of 20 patients requiring palatal surgery participated. Thickness of the palatal tissue was measured at various points radiographically and clinically. The two techniques were compared to determine the agreement of the two measurement modalities.

Results: Statistical analysis determined that there was no significant difference between the two methods. Moreover, the tissue thickness was shown to increase as the distance from the gingival margin increased, and the tissue over the premolars was thicker than the other teeth.

Conclusion: Cone-beam computerized tomography can be used as a noninvasive method to accurately and consistently determine the soft tissue thickness of the palatal masticatory mucosa with minimal bias at different locations on the palate.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparison of radiographic and clinical measurements
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Figure 5: Comparison of radiographic and clinical measurements

Mentions: Figure 4a–c show the representative CBCT images of the measurements performed at three different points that are, 2 mm, 5 mm and 8 mm from the gingival margin in case of the second premolar, respectively. Table 1 show the comparison between the measurements obtained via radiographic and clinical techniques at three different points (2 mm, 5 mm, 8 mm) from gingival margin in case of canine, first and second premolars and first molar. Statistical analysis of the data obtained did not reveal any statistically significant difference between the two techniques (P > 0.05). Graph 1 is the graphical representation of the comparison between the radiographic and clinical techniques used to measure the thickness of the palatal mucosa at three different locations in each of the four teeth.


Accuracy of cone-beam computerized tomography in determining the thickness of palatal masticatory mucosa.

Gupta P, Jan SM, Behal R, Mir RA, Shafi M - J Indian Soc Periodontol (2015 Jul-Aug)

Comparison of radiographic and clinical measurements
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555796&req=5

Figure 5: Comparison of radiographic and clinical measurements
Mentions: Figure 4a–c show the representative CBCT images of the measurements performed at three different points that are, 2 mm, 5 mm and 8 mm from the gingival margin in case of the second premolar, respectively. Table 1 show the comparison between the measurements obtained via radiographic and clinical techniques at three different points (2 mm, 5 mm, 8 mm) from gingival margin in case of canine, first and second premolars and first molar. Statistical analysis of the data obtained did not reveal any statistically significant difference between the two techniques (P > 0.05). Graph 1 is the graphical representation of the comparison between the radiographic and clinical techniques used to measure the thickness of the palatal mucosa at three different locations in each of the four teeth.

Bottom Line: Statistical analysis determined that there was no significant difference between the two methods.Moreover, the tissue thickness was shown to increase as the distance from the gingival margin increased, and the tissue over the premolars was thicker than the other teeth.Cone-beam computerized tomography can be used as a noninvasive method to accurately and consistently determine the soft tissue thickness of the palatal masticatory mucosa with minimal bias at different locations on the palate.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Periodontics and Oral Implantology, Government Dental College, Srinagar, Jammu and Kashmir, India.

ABSTRACT

Background: The palatal masticatory mucosa is the main donor area of soft tissue and connective tissue grafts used for increasing the keratinized mucosa around teeth and implants, covering exposed roots and increasing localized alveolar ridge thickness. The aim of this study was to compare the thickness of the palatal masticatory mucosa as determined on a cone-beam computerized tomography scan versus thickness determined via bone-sounding.

Materials and methods: A total of 20 patients requiring palatal surgery participated. Thickness of the palatal tissue was measured at various points radiographically and clinically. The two techniques were compared to determine the agreement of the two measurement modalities.

Results: Statistical analysis determined that there was no significant difference between the two methods. Moreover, the tissue thickness was shown to increase as the distance from the gingival margin increased, and the tissue over the premolars was thicker than the other teeth.

Conclusion: Cone-beam computerized tomography can be used as a noninvasive method to accurately and consistently determine the soft tissue thickness of the palatal masticatory mucosa with minimal bias at different locations on the palate.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus