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Neurophysiological Evidence of Compensatory Brain Mechanisms in Early-Stage Multiple Sclerosis.

López-Góngora M, Escartín A, Martínez-Horta S, Fernández-Bobadilla R, Querol L, Romero S, Mañanas MÀ, Riba J - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: No differences in performance were found between groups in most neuropsychological tests or in behavior or ERP components in the auditory oddball task.However, the amplitude of the ERN associated with stop errors in the stop task was significantly higher in patients.Results suggest the development of compensatory brain mechanisms in early-stage MS and reflect the sensitivity of the ERN to detect these changes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Multiple Sclerosis Unit, Neurology Department, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; Departament de Medicina, Universitat Autónoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; Multiple Sclerosis Research Group, Biomedical Research Institute (IIB-Sant Pau), Barcelona, Spain.

ABSTRACT
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic central nervous system disorder characterized by white matter inflammation, demyelination and neurodegeneration. Although cognitive dysfunction is a common manifestation, it may go unnoticed in recently-diagnosed patients. Prior studies suggest MS patients develop compensatory mechanisms potentially involving enhanced performance monitoring. Here we assessed the performance monitoring system in early-stage MS patients using the error-related negativity (ERN), an event-related brain potential (ERP) observed following behavioral errors. Twenty-seven early-stage MS patients and 31 controls were neuropsychologically assessed. Electroencephalography recordings were obtained while participants performed: a) a stop task and b) an auditory oddball task. Behavior and ERP measures were assessed. No differences in performance were found between groups in most neuropsychological tests or in behavior or ERP components in the auditory oddball task. However, the amplitude of the ERN associated with stop errors in the stop task was significantly higher in patients. ERN amplitude correlated positively with scores on the Expanded Disability Status Scale and the Multiple Sclerosis Severity Score, and negatively with the time since last relapse. Patients showed higher neuronal recruitment in tasks involving performance monitoring. Results suggest the development of compensatory brain mechanisms in early-stage MS and reflect the sensitivity of the ERN to detect these changes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

ERPs associated with auditory the oddball task. Grand-average stimulus-locked ERPs at Fz, Cz and Pz following the presentation of standard tones (solid black lines), target tones (solid grey lines), and novel tones (dotted grey lines).Amplitude of the P3b component (target tones) was maximum at Pz, whereas amplitude of the P3a component (novel tones) was maximum at Cz. No differences in amplitudes or latencies were found between MS patients and controls.
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pone.0136786.g002: ERPs associated with auditory the oddball task. Grand-average stimulus-locked ERPs at Fz, Cz and Pz following the presentation of standard tones (solid black lines), target tones (solid grey lines), and novel tones (dotted grey lines).Amplitude of the P3b component (target tones) was maximum at Pz, whereas amplitude of the P3a component (novel tones) was maximum at Cz. No differences in amplitudes or latencies were found between MS patients and controls.

Mentions: The preprocessing steps involving eye-blink minimization and artifact correction yielded an epoch rejection of only 2%. Fig 2 illustrates ERPs associated with the standard, target, and novel stimuli in the auditory oddball task. A centro-parietal P3b component is present in the target waveforms, whereas a more frontally distributed P3a is seen for the novel stimuli. Visual inspection of the grand averages did not reveal any differences between MS patients and controls. This was confirmed by the statistical analyses of the latency and magnitude of the ERP components.


Neurophysiological Evidence of Compensatory Brain Mechanisms in Early-Stage Multiple Sclerosis.

López-Góngora M, Escartín A, Martínez-Horta S, Fernández-Bobadilla R, Querol L, Romero S, Mañanas MÀ, Riba J - PLoS ONE (2015)

ERPs associated with auditory the oddball task. Grand-average stimulus-locked ERPs at Fz, Cz and Pz following the presentation of standard tones (solid black lines), target tones (solid grey lines), and novel tones (dotted grey lines).Amplitude of the P3b component (target tones) was maximum at Pz, whereas amplitude of the P3a component (novel tones) was maximum at Cz. No differences in amplitudes or latencies were found between MS patients and controls.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555654&req=5

pone.0136786.g002: ERPs associated with auditory the oddball task. Grand-average stimulus-locked ERPs at Fz, Cz and Pz following the presentation of standard tones (solid black lines), target tones (solid grey lines), and novel tones (dotted grey lines).Amplitude of the P3b component (target tones) was maximum at Pz, whereas amplitude of the P3a component (novel tones) was maximum at Cz. No differences in amplitudes or latencies were found between MS patients and controls.
Mentions: The preprocessing steps involving eye-blink minimization and artifact correction yielded an epoch rejection of only 2%. Fig 2 illustrates ERPs associated with the standard, target, and novel stimuli in the auditory oddball task. A centro-parietal P3b component is present in the target waveforms, whereas a more frontally distributed P3a is seen for the novel stimuli. Visual inspection of the grand averages did not reveal any differences between MS patients and controls. This was confirmed by the statistical analyses of the latency and magnitude of the ERP components.

Bottom Line: No differences in performance were found between groups in most neuropsychological tests or in behavior or ERP components in the auditory oddball task.However, the amplitude of the ERN associated with stop errors in the stop task was significantly higher in patients.Results suggest the development of compensatory brain mechanisms in early-stage MS and reflect the sensitivity of the ERN to detect these changes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Multiple Sclerosis Unit, Neurology Department, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; Departament de Medicina, Universitat Autónoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; Multiple Sclerosis Research Group, Biomedical Research Institute (IIB-Sant Pau), Barcelona, Spain.

ABSTRACT
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic central nervous system disorder characterized by white matter inflammation, demyelination and neurodegeneration. Although cognitive dysfunction is a common manifestation, it may go unnoticed in recently-diagnosed patients. Prior studies suggest MS patients develop compensatory mechanisms potentially involving enhanced performance monitoring. Here we assessed the performance monitoring system in early-stage MS patients using the error-related negativity (ERN), an event-related brain potential (ERP) observed following behavioral errors. Twenty-seven early-stage MS patients and 31 controls were neuropsychologically assessed. Electroencephalography recordings were obtained while participants performed: a) a stop task and b) an auditory oddball task. Behavior and ERP measures were assessed. No differences in performance were found between groups in most neuropsychological tests or in behavior or ERP components in the auditory oddball task. However, the amplitude of the ERN associated with stop errors in the stop task was significantly higher in patients. ERN amplitude correlated positively with scores on the Expanded Disability Status Scale and the Multiple Sclerosis Severity Score, and negatively with the time since last relapse. Patients showed higher neuronal recruitment in tasks involving performance monitoring. Results suggest the development of compensatory brain mechanisms in early-stage MS and reflect the sensitivity of the ERN to detect these changes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus