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Statistical Patterns in Movie Rating Behavior.

Ramos M, Calvão AM, Anteneodo C - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: We find that the distribution of votes presents scale-free behavior over several orders of magnitude, with an exponent very close to 3/2, with exponential cutoff.It is remarkable that this pattern emerges independently of movie attributes such as average rating, age and genre, with the exception of a few genres and of high-budget films.These results point to a very general underlying mechanism for the propagation of adoption across potential audiences that is independent of the intrinsic features of a movie and that can be understood through a simple spreading model with mean-field avalanche dynamics.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physics, PUC-Rio, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Currently, users and consumers can review and rate products through online services, which provide huge databases that can be used to explore people's preferences and unveil behavioral patterns. In this work, we investigate patterns in movie ratings, considering IMDb (the Internet Movie Database), a highly visited site worldwide, as a source. We find that the distribution of votes presents scale-free behavior over several orders of magnitude, with an exponent very close to 3/2, with exponential cutoff. It is remarkable that this pattern emerges independently of movie attributes such as average rating, age and genre, with the exception of a few genres and of high-budget films. These results point to a very general underlying mechanism for the propagation of adoption across potential audiences that is independent of the intrinsic features of a movie and that can be understood through a simple spreading model with mean-field avalanche dynamics.

No MeSH data available.


Impact of the budget of feature films on the distribution of votes P(nv) for (a) the two groups  and  separated by the median with respect to the budget and (b) the four groups  using the quartiles, indicated in Fig 8, and the last percentile .The dashed line with slope -3/2 is drawn for comparison, as well as the distribution for all films with budget information (only feature films with bi ≥ 103 US$ were considered).
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pone.0136083.g009: Impact of the budget of feature films on the distribution of votes P(nv) for (a) the two groups and separated by the median with respect to the budget and (b) the four groups using the quartiles, indicated in Fig 8, and the last percentile .The dashed line with slope -3/2 is drawn for comparison, as well as the distribution for all films with budget information (only feature films with bi ≥ 103 US$ were considered).

Mentions: The distribution of votes for this set (with budget information) does not have the 3/2 power law decay that is characteristic of the entire dataset and shown in previous figures (Fig 9a). To analyze this issue more deeply, we divided the dataset using the median and observed that the high-budget half is responsible for that deviation, while the low-budget half preserves the 3/2 power law. Next, we proceeded to analyze other quantiles. In Fig 9b (and in Fig 8), we see that beyond the level of the median (where the curve given by a non-parametric regression takes off), the distribution completely loses a scaling region. Furthermore, the probability of a large nv increases with the budget and even develops a peak, as observed for the last percentile. That is, a movie’s production budget practically becomes a determinant of the average number of votes it receives. This result shows that a different generative mechanism governs the distribution of votes given to high-budget films, which is not a surprising result because huge budgets include advertising and publicity actions to reach large audiences. The effect of budget may explain why some genres that are typically associated with high production costs, such as action movies and thrillers, present a slightly smaller exponent than the majority of movies.


Statistical Patterns in Movie Rating Behavior.

Ramos M, Calvão AM, Anteneodo C - PLoS ONE (2015)

Impact of the budget of feature films on the distribution of votes P(nv) for (a) the two groups  and  separated by the median with respect to the budget and (b) the four groups  using the quartiles, indicated in Fig 8, and the last percentile .The dashed line with slope -3/2 is drawn for comparison, as well as the distribution for all films with budget information (only feature films with bi ≥ 103 US$ were considered).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555649&req=5

pone.0136083.g009: Impact of the budget of feature films on the distribution of votes P(nv) for (a) the two groups and separated by the median with respect to the budget and (b) the four groups using the quartiles, indicated in Fig 8, and the last percentile .The dashed line with slope -3/2 is drawn for comparison, as well as the distribution for all films with budget information (only feature films with bi ≥ 103 US$ were considered).
Mentions: The distribution of votes for this set (with budget information) does not have the 3/2 power law decay that is characteristic of the entire dataset and shown in previous figures (Fig 9a). To analyze this issue more deeply, we divided the dataset using the median and observed that the high-budget half is responsible for that deviation, while the low-budget half preserves the 3/2 power law. Next, we proceeded to analyze other quantiles. In Fig 9b (and in Fig 8), we see that beyond the level of the median (where the curve given by a non-parametric regression takes off), the distribution completely loses a scaling region. Furthermore, the probability of a large nv increases with the budget and even develops a peak, as observed for the last percentile. That is, a movie’s production budget practically becomes a determinant of the average number of votes it receives. This result shows that a different generative mechanism governs the distribution of votes given to high-budget films, which is not a surprising result because huge budgets include advertising and publicity actions to reach large audiences. The effect of budget may explain why some genres that are typically associated with high production costs, such as action movies and thrillers, present a slightly smaller exponent than the majority of movies.

Bottom Line: We find that the distribution of votes presents scale-free behavior over several orders of magnitude, with an exponent very close to 3/2, with exponential cutoff.It is remarkable that this pattern emerges independently of movie attributes such as average rating, age and genre, with the exception of a few genres and of high-budget films.These results point to a very general underlying mechanism for the propagation of adoption across potential audiences that is independent of the intrinsic features of a movie and that can be understood through a simple spreading model with mean-field avalanche dynamics.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physics, PUC-Rio, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Currently, users and consumers can review and rate products through online services, which provide huge databases that can be used to explore people's preferences and unveil behavioral patterns. In this work, we investigate patterns in movie ratings, considering IMDb (the Internet Movie Database), a highly visited site worldwide, as a source. We find that the distribution of votes presents scale-free behavior over several orders of magnitude, with an exponent very close to 3/2, with exponential cutoff. It is remarkable that this pattern emerges independently of movie attributes such as average rating, age and genre, with the exception of a few genres and of high-budget films. These results point to a very general underlying mechanism for the propagation of adoption across potential audiences that is independent of the intrinsic features of a movie and that can be understood through a simple spreading model with mean-field avalanche dynamics.

No MeSH data available.