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Statistical Patterns in Movie Rating Behavior.

Ramos M, Calvão AM, Anteneodo C - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: We find that the distribution of votes presents scale-free behavior over several orders of magnitude, with an exponent very close to 3/2, with exponential cutoff.It is remarkable that this pattern emerges independently of movie attributes such as average rating, age and genre, with the exception of a few genres and of high-budget films.These results point to a very general underlying mechanism for the propagation of adoption across potential audiences that is independent of the intrinsic features of a movie and that can be understood through a simple spreading model with mean-field avalanche dynamics.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physics, PUC-Rio, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Currently, users and consumers can review and rate products through online services, which provide huge databases that can be used to explore people's preferences and unveil behavioral patterns. In this work, we investigate patterns in movie ratings, considering IMDb (the Internet Movie Database), a highly visited site worldwide, as a source. We find that the distribution of votes presents scale-free behavior over several orders of magnitude, with an exponent very close to 3/2, with exponential cutoff. It is remarkable that this pattern emerges independently of movie attributes such as average rating, age and genre, with the exception of a few genres and of high-budget films. These results point to a very general underlying mechanism for the propagation of adoption across potential audiences that is independent of the intrinsic features of a movie and that can be understood through a simple spreading model with mean-field avalanche dynamics.

No MeSH data available.


Impact of ratings on the distribution P(nv) of votes for IMDb movies, for (a) the two groups  and  separated by the median and (b) the four groups  determined by the quartiles, as indicated in Fig 2.In this and other equivalent figures, the dashed line with slope -3/2 is drawn for comparison with the distribution of the entire dataset.
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pone.0136083.g003: Impact of ratings on the distribution P(nv) of votes for IMDb movies, for (a) the two groups and separated by the median and (b) the four groups determined by the quartiles, as indicated in Fig 2.In this and other equivalent figures, the dashed line with slope -3/2 is drawn for comparison with the distribution of the entire dataset.

Mentions: A natural question arises: how is the normalized distribution of votes affected by movie ratings? To examine this issue, we obtained P(nv) for separate groups of data, splitting the entire set by the median with respect to the rating. That is, we separately considered the lower- and higher-rated halves of the entire dataset, and , respectively. We also considered the quartiles and subdivided the dataset into the groups . The results are shown in Fig 3. Note that P(nv) is almost insensitive to whether a rating is favorable or not. That is, data above and below the median present the same pattern, coinciding over the four decades of the power law regime (Fig 3a). The main discrepancy appears at the exponential cutoff above 105 votes, where the decay occurs faster for the lower-rated half. This is consistent with the fact that low-rated movies do not receive the extremely high number of votes given to high-rated movies. However, the same scale-free behavior holds for both halves over several orders of magnitude in the number of votes, pointing to a mechanism independent of the attributes measured by ratings. The same tendencies are observed at the level of quartiles, as depicted in Fig 3b, and at the level of the number of stars (not shown).


Statistical Patterns in Movie Rating Behavior.

Ramos M, Calvão AM, Anteneodo C - PLoS ONE (2015)

Impact of ratings on the distribution P(nv) of votes for IMDb movies, for (a) the two groups  and  separated by the median and (b) the four groups  determined by the quartiles, as indicated in Fig 2.In this and other equivalent figures, the dashed line with slope -3/2 is drawn for comparison with the distribution of the entire dataset.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555649&req=5

pone.0136083.g003: Impact of ratings on the distribution P(nv) of votes for IMDb movies, for (a) the two groups and separated by the median and (b) the four groups determined by the quartiles, as indicated in Fig 2.In this and other equivalent figures, the dashed line with slope -3/2 is drawn for comparison with the distribution of the entire dataset.
Mentions: A natural question arises: how is the normalized distribution of votes affected by movie ratings? To examine this issue, we obtained P(nv) for separate groups of data, splitting the entire set by the median with respect to the rating. That is, we separately considered the lower- and higher-rated halves of the entire dataset, and , respectively. We also considered the quartiles and subdivided the dataset into the groups . The results are shown in Fig 3. Note that P(nv) is almost insensitive to whether a rating is favorable or not. That is, data above and below the median present the same pattern, coinciding over the four decades of the power law regime (Fig 3a). The main discrepancy appears at the exponential cutoff above 105 votes, where the decay occurs faster for the lower-rated half. This is consistent with the fact that low-rated movies do not receive the extremely high number of votes given to high-rated movies. However, the same scale-free behavior holds for both halves over several orders of magnitude in the number of votes, pointing to a mechanism independent of the attributes measured by ratings. The same tendencies are observed at the level of quartiles, as depicted in Fig 3b, and at the level of the number of stars (not shown).

Bottom Line: We find that the distribution of votes presents scale-free behavior over several orders of magnitude, with an exponent very close to 3/2, with exponential cutoff.It is remarkable that this pattern emerges independently of movie attributes such as average rating, age and genre, with the exception of a few genres and of high-budget films.These results point to a very general underlying mechanism for the propagation of adoption across potential audiences that is independent of the intrinsic features of a movie and that can be understood through a simple spreading model with mean-field avalanche dynamics.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physics, PUC-Rio, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Currently, users and consumers can review and rate products through online services, which provide huge databases that can be used to explore people's preferences and unveil behavioral patterns. In this work, we investigate patterns in movie ratings, considering IMDb (the Internet Movie Database), a highly visited site worldwide, as a source. We find that the distribution of votes presents scale-free behavior over several orders of magnitude, with an exponent very close to 3/2, with exponential cutoff. It is remarkable that this pattern emerges independently of movie attributes such as average rating, age and genre, with the exception of a few genres and of high-budget films. These results point to a very general underlying mechanism for the propagation of adoption across potential audiences that is independent of the intrinsic features of a movie and that can be understood through a simple spreading model with mean-field avalanche dynamics.

No MeSH data available.