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How to trigger a fungal weapon.

Haas H - Elife (2015)

Bottom Line: A fungus called Aspergillus terreus produces a secondary metabolite in response to various environmental signals to give it an advantage over its competitors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Molecular Biology, Biocenter, Medical University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.

ABSTRACT
A fungus called Aspergillus terreus produces a secondary metabolite in response to various environmental signals to give it an advantage over its competitors.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Environmental signals activate production of terrein by the mold Aspergillus terreus to improve its competitiveness.To adapt to changing environmental conditions and different ecological niches, microorganisms need to be able to sense and respond to environmental signals. Gressler et al. identified three independent signals that stimulate production of the compound terrein by Aspergillus terreus – nitrogen starvation, methionine, and iron starvation. In this mold's natural niche within plants and in the soil surrounding plant roots, terrein is a chemical weapon used to inhibit the growth of bacteria, plants and other fungi, but also helps to improve iron supply to the producer.
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fig1: Environmental signals activate production of terrein by the mold Aspergillus terreus to improve its competitiveness.To adapt to changing environmental conditions and different ecological niches, microorganisms need to be able to sense and respond to environmental signals. Gressler et al. identified three independent signals that stimulate production of the compound terrein by Aspergillus terreus – nitrogen starvation, methionine, and iron starvation. In this mold's natural niche within plants and in the soil surrounding plant roots, terrein is a chemical weapon used to inhibit the growth of bacteria, plants and other fungi, but also helps to improve iron supply to the producer.

Mentions: Well-known examples of secondary metabolites produced by fungi are the poisonous food contaminant aflatoxin, the antibiotic penicillin and the anticancer drug taxol. These molecules illustrate the negative and positive effects of secondary metabolites on humans, and underline their outstanding potential for medicinal use. However, it is not known what roles most of these molecules play in the lives of the fungi that produce them. Moreover, most secondary metabolites are not produced when the fungi are grown in the laboratory, which makes it difficult to characterize them. Now in eLife, Matthias Brock and co-workers – including Markus Gressler as first author – report a new role for a major secondary metabolite called terrein, and characterize the environmental stimuli that induce the mold Aspergillus terreus to produce it (Figure 1; Gressler et al., 2015).Figure 1.Environmental signals activate production of terrein by the mold Aspergillus terreus to improve its competitiveness.


How to trigger a fungal weapon.

Haas H - Elife (2015)

Environmental signals activate production of terrein by the mold Aspergillus terreus to improve its competitiveness.To adapt to changing environmental conditions and different ecological niches, microorganisms need to be able to sense and respond to environmental signals. Gressler et al. identified three independent signals that stimulate production of the compound terrein by Aspergillus terreus – nitrogen starvation, methionine, and iron starvation. In this mold's natural niche within plants and in the soil surrounding plant roots, terrein is a chemical weapon used to inhibit the growth of bacteria, plants and other fungi, but also helps to improve iron supply to the producer.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555636&req=5

fig1: Environmental signals activate production of terrein by the mold Aspergillus terreus to improve its competitiveness.To adapt to changing environmental conditions and different ecological niches, microorganisms need to be able to sense and respond to environmental signals. Gressler et al. identified three independent signals that stimulate production of the compound terrein by Aspergillus terreus – nitrogen starvation, methionine, and iron starvation. In this mold's natural niche within plants and in the soil surrounding plant roots, terrein is a chemical weapon used to inhibit the growth of bacteria, plants and other fungi, but also helps to improve iron supply to the producer.
Mentions: Well-known examples of secondary metabolites produced by fungi are the poisonous food contaminant aflatoxin, the antibiotic penicillin and the anticancer drug taxol. These molecules illustrate the negative and positive effects of secondary metabolites on humans, and underline their outstanding potential for medicinal use. However, it is not known what roles most of these molecules play in the lives of the fungi that produce them. Moreover, most secondary metabolites are not produced when the fungi are grown in the laboratory, which makes it difficult to characterize them. Now in eLife, Matthias Brock and co-workers – including Markus Gressler as first author – report a new role for a major secondary metabolite called terrein, and characterize the environmental stimuli that induce the mold Aspergillus terreus to produce it (Figure 1; Gressler et al., 2015).Figure 1.Environmental signals activate production of terrein by the mold Aspergillus terreus to improve its competitiveness.

Bottom Line: A fungus called Aspergillus terreus produces a secondary metabolite in response to various environmental signals to give it an advantage over its competitors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Molecular Biology, Biocenter, Medical University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.

ABSTRACT
A fungus called Aspergillus terreus produces a secondary metabolite in response to various environmental signals to give it an advantage over its competitors.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus