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Asymmetric Hip Rotation in Professional Baseball Pitchers.

McCulloch PC, Patel JK, Ramkumar PN, Noble PC, Lintner DM - Orthop J Sports Med (2014)

Bottom Line: In right-handed pitchers, there was significantly more internal rotation in the stance hip than the stride hip (32.2° ± 8.2° vs 30.8° ± 8.4°; P = .0349) and significantly more external rotation in the stride hip than the stance hip (36.3° ± 7.7° vs 30.8° ± 9.7°; P < .0001).In the smaller number of left-handed pitchers, side-to-side differences in hip rotation were found but were not statistically significant.Although the mean differences are small, there is a subset of pitchers with defined characteristics in whom larger differences exist.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Houston Methodist Hospital, Houston, Texas, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: There is a renewed interest in examining the association between hip range of motion and injury in athletes, and the data on baseball players are conflicting. Understanding whether asymmetrical hip rotation is a normal adaptation or a risk factor for injury will help therapists, trainers, and physicians develop rehabilitation programs to improve kinetic energy transfer and prevent injury. As our knowledge of hip pathology among baseball pitchers improves, establishing baselines for hip motion is critical in the further assessment of injury.

Hypothesis: Because of the repetitive nature of throwing sports and the adaptive changes documented in the shoulder, elite baseball pitchers would have characteristic patterns of hip internal and external rotations on their dominant throwing side (stance) and their nondominant side (stride) in extension.

Study design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3.

Methods: Computer software was used to measure passive internal and external rotations on digital photographs of 111 professional baseball pitchers.

Results: In right-handed pitchers, there was significantly more internal rotation in the stance hip than the stride hip (32.2° ± 8.2° vs 30.8° ± 8.4°; P = .0349) and significantly more external rotation in the stride hip than the stance hip (36.3° ± 7.7° vs 30.8° ± 9.7°; P < .0001). While the mean difference in external rotation was 4.7°, 32% of the subjects had a >10° increase in external rotation on the stride hip relative to the stance hip. This population was statistically different from the remaining group for older age (P = .0053), lower body mass index (P = .0379), and more years in professional baseball (P = .0328). In the smaller number of left-handed pitchers, side-to-side differences in hip rotation were found but were not statistically significant.

Conclusion: Pitchers showed more internal rotation on their stance hip and more external rotation on their stride hip. Although the mean differences are small, there is a subset of pitchers with defined characteristics in whom larger differences exist.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

External rotation in the dominant versus nondominant hip for right-handed pitchers. Patients with <10° side-to-side difference for both internal and external rotation (red squares) are plotted against the subset of unique patients for body mass index, age, and professional pitching experience with >10° of external rotation in the nondominant hip (blue diamonds).
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fig3-2325967114521575: External rotation in the dominant versus nondominant hip for right-handed pitchers. Patients with <10° side-to-side difference for both internal and external rotation (red squares) are plotted against the subset of unique patients for body mass index, age, and professional pitching experience with >10° of external rotation in the nondominant hip (blue diamonds).

Mentions: In RHPs (n = 77), the stance hip had statistically significantly more IR than the stride hip (32.2° ± 8.2° vs 30.8° ± 8.4°; P = .0349). The stride hip had statistically significantly more ER than the stance hip (36.3° ± 7.7° vs 30.8° ± 9.7°; P < .0001). While the average difference was 4.7°, 32% (25/77) had a >10° increase in ER on their stride leg compared with their stance leg (Figure 3). On further analysis of this subgroup, these 25 players were unique compared with the remaining 52 in terms of age, body mass index, and professional baseball experience. These players were older (26.7 ± 4.9 vs 23.4 ± 4.75 years), had lower body mass indices (25.2 ± 1.7 vs 26.14 ± 1.9 kg/m2), and spent more years in professional baseball (2.5 ± 4.2 vs 0.71 ± 2.8) (Table 2). A larger arc of rotation was seen in the stride hip than the stance hip (67.1° ± 10.5° vs 62.9° ± 11.9°; P < .0002).


Asymmetric Hip Rotation in Professional Baseball Pitchers.

McCulloch PC, Patel JK, Ramkumar PN, Noble PC, Lintner DM - Orthop J Sports Med (2014)

External rotation in the dominant versus nondominant hip for right-handed pitchers. Patients with <10° side-to-side difference for both internal and external rotation (red squares) are plotted against the subset of unique patients for body mass index, age, and professional pitching experience with >10° of external rotation in the nondominant hip (blue diamonds).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2 - License 3
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555616&req=5

fig3-2325967114521575: External rotation in the dominant versus nondominant hip for right-handed pitchers. Patients with <10° side-to-side difference for both internal and external rotation (red squares) are plotted against the subset of unique patients for body mass index, age, and professional pitching experience with >10° of external rotation in the nondominant hip (blue diamonds).
Mentions: In RHPs (n = 77), the stance hip had statistically significantly more IR than the stride hip (32.2° ± 8.2° vs 30.8° ± 8.4°; P = .0349). The stride hip had statistically significantly more ER than the stance hip (36.3° ± 7.7° vs 30.8° ± 9.7°; P < .0001). While the average difference was 4.7°, 32% (25/77) had a >10° increase in ER on their stride leg compared with their stance leg (Figure 3). On further analysis of this subgroup, these 25 players were unique compared with the remaining 52 in terms of age, body mass index, and professional baseball experience. These players were older (26.7 ± 4.9 vs 23.4 ± 4.75 years), had lower body mass indices (25.2 ± 1.7 vs 26.14 ± 1.9 kg/m2), and spent more years in professional baseball (2.5 ± 4.2 vs 0.71 ± 2.8) (Table 2). A larger arc of rotation was seen in the stride hip than the stance hip (67.1° ± 10.5° vs 62.9° ± 11.9°; P < .0002).

Bottom Line: In right-handed pitchers, there was significantly more internal rotation in the stance hip than the stride hip (32.2° ± 8.2° vs 30.8° ± 8.4°; P = .0349) and significantly more external rotation in the stride hip than the stance hip (36.3° ± 7.7° vs 30.8° ± 9.7°; P < .0001).In the smaller number of left-handed pitchers, side-to-side differences in hip rotation were found but were not statistically significant.Although the mean differences are small, there is a subset of pitchers with defined characteristics in whom larger differences exist.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Houston Methodist Hospital, Houston, Texas, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: There is a renewed interest in examining the association between hip range of motion and injury in athletes, and the data on baseball players are conflicting. Understanding whether asymmetrical hip rotation is a normal adaptation or a risk factor for injury will help therapists, trainers, and physicians develop rehabilitation programs to improve kinetic energy transfer and prevent injury. As our knowledge of hip pathology among baseball pitchers improves, establishing baselines for hip motion is critical in the further assessment of injury.

Hypothesis: Because of the repetitive nature of throwing sports and the adaptive changes documented in the shoulder, elite baseball pitchers would have characteristic patterns of hip internal and external rotations on their dominant throwing side (stance) and their nondominant side (stride) in extension.

Study design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3.

Methods: Computer software was used to measure passive internal and external rotations on digital photographs of 111 professional baseball pitchers.

Results: In right-handed pitchers, there was significantly more internal rotation in the stance hip than the stride hip (32.2° ± 8.2° vs 30.8° ± 8.4°; P = .0349) and significantly more external rotation in the stride hip than the stance hip (36.3° ± 7.7° vs 30.8° ± 9.7°; P < .0001). While the mean difference in external rotation was 4.7°, 32% of the subjects had a >10° increase in external rotation on the stride hip relative to the stance hip. This population was statistically different from the remaining group for older age (P = .0053), lower body mass index (P = .0379), and more years in professional baseball (P = .0328). In the smaller number of left-handed pitchers, side-to-side differences in hip rotation were found but were not statistically significant.

Conclusion: Pitchers showed more internal rotation on their stance hip and more external rotation on their stride hip. Although the mean differences are small, there is a subset of pitchers with defined characteristics in whom larger differences exist.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus