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Good Results After Hip Arthroscopy for Femoroacetabular Impingement in Top-Level Athletes.

Sansone M, Ahldén M, Jonasson P, Thomeé C, Swärd L, Baranto A, Karlsson J, Thomeé R - Orthop J Sports Med (2015)

Bottom Line: At the 12-month follow-up, 79 athletes (93%) reported that they were satisfied with the outcome of surgery.Twelve months after surgery, arthroscopic treatment for FAI in top-level athletes resulted in statistically and clinically significant improvements at the group level in all outcome parameters for pain, symptoms, function, physical activity level, quality of life, and general health.One year after surgery, approximately 3 of 4 top-level athletes had returned to sports.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Mölndal, Mölndal, Sweden.

ABSTRACT

Background: Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a common cause of hip pain and dysfunction among athletes. Although arthroscopic surgery is an established treatment option for FAI, there are few studies reporting detailed outcomes using validated outcome measurements specifically designed for young and active athletes.

Purpose: To report outcomes 1 year after arthroscopic treatment of FAI in top-level athletes using validated outcome measurements adapted for a young and active population.

Study design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4.

Methods: A total of 85 top-level athletes (68 males, 17 females) with a mean (±SD) age of 25 ± 5 years underwent arthroscopic surgery for FAI. All athletes who reported Hip Sports Activity Scale (HSAS) levels 7 or 8 (range, 0-8) prior to symptom onset were included. The cohort was prospectively evaluated using online web-based validated health-related patient-reported outcomes measures (HR-PROMs), including the short version of the International Hip Outcome Tool (iHOT-12), the Copenhagen Hip and Groin Outcome Score (HAGOS; 6 subscales), the EuroQOL 5 dimensions questionnaire (EQ-5D; 2 subscales), the Hip Sports Activity Scale (HSAS) for physical activity level, and a visual analog scale (VAS) for overall hip function. Furthermore, patients reported their overall satisfaction with treatment.

Results: The mean follow-up time was 12.3 ± 0.6 months. Preoperative scores compared with those obtained at the 12-month follow-up revealed statistically and clinically significant improvements (P < .0001) for all measured outcomes: iHOT-12 (42 vs 73), VAS for global hip function (52 vs 77), HSAS (4.3 vs 5.7), EQ-5D index (0.60 vs 0.83), EQ-VAS (68 vs 82), and HAGOS subscales (60 vs 83, 50 vs 73, 66 vs 86, 39 vs 75, 27 vs 70, and 34 vs 67). At the 12-month follow-up, 79 athletes (93%) reported that they were satisfied with the outcome of surgery. At follow-up, 62 athletes (73%) had returned to competitive sports (HSAS levels 5-8) and 44 (52%) to their previous HSAS level of activity (HSAS level 7 or 8). Twenty-three athletes (27%) did not return to competitive sports (HSAS level ≤4). Significantly lower levels of return to sports were seen with longer symptom duration (P < .05).

Conclusion: Twelve months after surgery, arthroscopic treatment for FAI in top-level athletes resulted in statistically and clinically significant improvements at the group level in all outcome parameters for pain, symptoms, function, physical activity level, quality of life, and general health. One year after surgery, approximately 3 of 4 top-level athletes had returned to sports.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Change per individual on the International Hip Outcome Tool–short version (iHOT-12) between preoperative and 12-month follow-up.
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fig3-2325967115569691: Change per individual on the International Hip Outcome Tool–short version (iHOT-12) between preoperative and 12-month follow-up.

Mentions: A comparison of preoperative scores with those obtained at the 12-month follow-up revealed statistically and clinically significant improvements (P < .0001) for all measured outcomes: iHOT-12 (42 vs 73), VAS for global hip function (52 vs 77), HSAS (4.3 vs 5.7), EQ-5D index (0.60 vs 0.83), EQ-VAS (68 vs 82), and HAGOS different subscales (60 vs 83, 50 vs 73, 66 vs 86, 39 vs 75, 27 vs 70, and 34 vs 67) (Table 5). Figure 3 shows the change in the iHOT-12 from preoperatively to postoperatively at the individual level.


Good Results After Hip Arthroscopy for Femoroacetabular Impingement in Top-Level Athletes.

Sansone M, Ahldén M, Jonasson P, Thomeé C, Swärd L, Baranto A, Karlsson J, Thomeé R - Orthop J Sports Med (2015)

Change per individual on the International Hip Outcome Tool–short version (iHOT-12) between preoperative and 12-month follow-up.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2 - License 3
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555608&req=5

fig3-2325967115569691: Change per individual on the International Hip Outcome Tool–short version (iHOT-12) between preoperative and 12-month follow-up.
Mentions: A comparison of preoperative scores with those obtained at the 12-month follow-up revealed statistically and clinically significant improvements (P < .0001) for all measured outcomes: iHOT-12 (42 vs 73), VAS for global hip function (52 vs 77), HSAS (4.3 vs 5.7), EQ-5D index (0.60 vs 0.83), EQ-VAS (68 vs 82), and HAGOS different subscales (60 vs 83, 50 vs 73, 66 vs 86, 39 vs 75, 27 vs 70, and 34 vs 67) (Table 5). Figure 3 shows the change in the iHOT-12 from preoperatively to postoperatively at the individual level.

Bottom Line: At the 12-month follow-up, 79 athletes (93%) reported that they were satisfied with the outcome of surgery.Twelve months after surgery, arthroscopic treatment for FAI in top-level athletes resulted in statistically and clinically significant improvements at the group level in all outcome parameters for pain, symptoms, function, physical activity level, quality of life, and general health.One year after surgery, approximately 3 of 4 top-level athletes had returned to sports.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Mölndal, Mölndal, Sweden.

ABSTRACT

Background: Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a common cause of hip pain and dysfunction among athletes. Although arthroscopic surgery is an established treatment option for FAI, there are few studies reporting detailed outcomes using validated outcome measurements specifically designed for young and active athletes.

Purpose: To report outcomes 1 year after arthroscopic treatment of FAI in top-level athletes using validated outcome measurements adapted for a young and active population.

Study design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4.

Methods: A total of 85 top-level athletes (68 males, 17 females) with a mean (±SD) age of 25 ± 5 years underwent arthroscopic surgery for FAI. All athletes who reported Hip Sports Activity Scale (HSAS) levels 7 or 8 (range, 0-8) prior to symptom onset were included. The cohort was prospectively evaluated using online web-based validated health-related patient-reported outcomes measures (HR-PROMs), including the short version of the International Hip Outcome Tool (iHOT-12), the Copenhagen Hip and Groin Outcome Score (HAGOS; 6 subscales), the EuroQOL 5 dimensions questionnaire (EQ-5D; 2 subscales), the Hip Sports Activity Scale (HSAS) for physical activity level, and a visual analog scale (VAS) for overall hip function. Furthermore, patients reported their overall satisfaction with treatment.

Results: The mean follow-up time was 12.3 ± 0.6 months. Preoperative scores compared with those obtained at the 12-month follow-up revealed statistically and clinically significant improvements (P < .0001) for all measured outcomes: iHOT-12 (42 vs 73), VAS for global hip function (52 vs 77), HSAS (4.3 vs 5.7), EQ-5D index (0.60 vs 0.83), EQ-VAS (68 vs 82), and HAGOS subscales (60 vs 83, 50 vs 73, 66 vs 86, 39 vs 75, 27 vs 70, and 34 vs 67). At the 12-month follow-up, 79 athletes (93%) reported that they were satisfied with the outcome of surgery. At follow-up, 62 athletes (73%) had returned to competitive sports (HSAS levels 5-8) and 44 (52%) to their previous HSAS level of activity (HSAS level 7 or 8). Twenty-three athletes (27%) did not return to competitive sports (HSAS level ≤4). Significantly lower levels of return to sports were seen with longer symptom duration (P < .05).

Conclusion: Twelve months after surgery, arthroscopic treatment for FAI in top-level athletes resulted in statistically and clinically significant improvements at the group level in all outcome parameters for pain, symptoms, function, physical activity level, quality of life, and general health. One year after surgery, approximately 3 of 4 top-level athletes had returned to sports.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus